French education – Lycee Paul Claudel http://lycee-paul-claudel.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 14:15:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png French education – Lycee Paul Claudel http://lycee-paul-claudel.com/ 32 32 teaching citizenship the values ​​of “common political responsibility” – EURACTIV.com https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/teaching-citizenship-the-values-of-common-political-responsibility-euractiv-com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 14:15:14 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/teaching-citizenship-the-values-of-common-political-responsibility-euractiv-com/ Education around citizenship values ​​across the EU is a “common political responsibility”, Education and Culture Commissioner Mariya Gabriel said in an interview with EURACTIV, adding that teachers can serve as “true role models” for European students. “School education is not limited to assimilating information. It is also about cultivate a particular attitude and promote certain […]]]>

Education around citizenship values ​​across the EU is a “common political responsibility”, Education and Culture Commissioner Mariya Gabriel said in an interview with EURACTIV, adding that teachers can serve as “true role models” for European students.

“School education is not limited to assimilating information. It is also about cultivate a particular attitude and promote certain values,” she said.

According to her, these values ​​allow citizens to be more active and to feel responsible towards their communities, their country and the European Union.

“To convey that sense of community, I believe it’s a common political responsibility that we have at all levels,” Gabriel said.

However, citizenship education remains a fragmented practice in the EU, with each Member State taking a different approach.

According to a study 2020 by the French Ministry of National Education, citizenship education is a compulsory subject in 16 of the 27 EU countries, but with different teaching hours dedicated to the subject.

At the end of secondary education, students benefit from 20 hours of citizenship education in Cyprus, 150 hours in French-speaking Belgium and 310 hours in France, reports the study.

In addition, only one in two students say they have had the opportunity to learn more about Europe at school in a 2016 survey.

According to Gabriel, knowing “what is really going on in Brussels” can stimulate active citizen participation, thereby increasing the proportion of people who vote in elections.

Jan Eichhorn, lecturer in social policy at the University of Edinburgh, said the research has clearly shown that civic education “really matters”.

“We see that civic education can have incredibly positive outcomes for both youth electoral engagement and non-electoral engagement with politics as well,” Eichhorn said.

Teachers as role models

According to Gabriel, teachers play a key role as “real role models” in promoting active citizenship and European values.

“We must ensure that this important attitude – and I can even call it a virtue – is part of the comprehensive education that European pupils receive, and that it begins at the earliest stages of education”, said said Gabriel.

Meanwhile, experts stress the importance of separating European values ​​from pro-European positions.

“There is a difference between pro-European as pro-EU and sharing some of these core values ​​like democracy, democracy, tolerance,” Eichhorn said, adding that having a civic education would be counterproductive. trying to encourage students to “say they love the European Union.”

“No, you don’t necessarily need to have a teacher who, you know, has a glorious view of certain institutions or processes, but they should share certain kinds of values ​​that are probably also values ​​enshrined in the constitutions of their country. ,” he said.

Teacher support

In order to stimulate new ways of teaching the EU in the classroom, the EU recently launched the program “EU initiativeswhich aims to finance schools and other training establishments.

However, Commissioner Gabriel acknowledged that teachers still need more support, especially in multilingual and multicultural environments.

Teacher mobility could partly remedy this, through the Erasmus+ programs and other tools promoting cross-border cooperation, such as the eTwinning platform, she said.

“We want all teachers and trainers to be able to benefit from learning mobility,” she said, adding that exposure to different pedagogies would also benefit students.

However, teachers often face time constraints, sometimes doing swaps in their spare time, according to Patrick Tardy, a high school teacher at the Lycée des Métiers Roland Garros in Toulouse.

Teacher mobility across the bloc remains low, with less than half of teachers in Europe having experienced transnational mobility, according to a pre-COVID study The data.

As mobility is slowly starting to return to pre-pandemic levels, Gabriel said the Commission’s aim is to “see even more done to make it an integral part of teacher training and teaching careers”.

[Edited by Nathalie Weatherald]

]]>
Sandra Perpich: Why reduce the quality of education by eliminating French? | Letters to the Editor https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/sandra-perpich-why-reduce-the-quality-of-education-by-eliminating-french-letters-to-the-editor/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 14:05:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/sandra-perpich-why-reduce-the-quality-of-education-by-eliminating-french-letters-to-the-editor/ At a recent social event, learning that the public schools in La Crosse will no longer be offering French classes after next year, I found myself in disbelief. Historically and linguistically, French has provided one of the two fundamental components of our own language. When William of Normandy conquered England in 1066, he brought with […]]]>

At a recent social event, learning that the public schools in La Crosse will no longer be offering French classes after next year, I found myself in disbelief. Historically and linguistically, French has provided one of the two fundamental components of our own language.

When William of Normandy conquered England in 1066, he brought with him French as the language of court life, so that French became a fundamental language of English law, culture and thought. Knowing French helps to better understand our own language and our social world, while removing the ability to learn French reduces educational opportunities for La Crosse students.

Also, since you can always travel around the world and La Crosse has a student exchange program with Epinal, France, studying French benefits La Crosse students by introducing them to the rest of the world. I asked neighbors with students at Central High School what they thought about this issue. Like me, they expressed shock and disbelief, unaware that the schools intended to remove French from La Crosse classrooms.

People also read…

Thus, two questions arise: First, why would the superintendent of La Crosse school choose to reduce the quality of education the system provides to its students? Second, why wouldn’t he easily communicate this intention to parents who seek the best possible education for their children?

]]>
Rocky View Schools Announces Leadership Changes for 2022-23 School Year https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/rocky-view-schools-announces-leadership-changes-for-2022-23-school-year/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/rocky-view-schools-announces-leadership-changes-for-2022-23-school-year/ Rocky View Schools has revealed which principals will be traveling or joining the school division this summer. Rocky View Schools (RVS) Superintendent of Schools Greg Luterbach announced a series of public school division leadership and leadership appointments that will take effect in August. “Our administrative leadership team is a team of dedicated, experienced and passionate […]]]>

Rocky View Schools has revealed which principals will be traveling or joining the school division this summer.

Rocky View Schools (RVS) Superintendent of Schools Greg Luterbach announced a series of public school division leadership and leadership appointments that will take effect in August.

“Our administrative leadership team is a team of dedicated, experienced and passionate educators,” Luterbach said in an RVS press release. “I congratulate each of our principals and vice-principals on their new roles and look forward to another great school year shaped by their leadership. »

Shane Dempster, Bow Valley Secondary School, Cochrane

Shane Dempster will join RVS from High Level Public School, where he is currently principal, to lead Bow Valley Secondary School in Cochrane as the new principal.

Dempster worked for 20 years in education with the Fort Vermilion School Division in northern Alberta. During this time, he has served as a junior and senior high school teacher, curriculum coordinator, vice principal and principal. He has spent nearly a decade in school leadership.

He holds a Master of Education in Instructional Leadership from the University of Calgary, a Bachelor of Education K-8 from the University of Maine, and a Bachelor of Arts in English and History from the University of Calgary. Francis Xavier University in Nova Scotia.

A passionate educational leader, Dempster prides himself on open and honest communication.

Jim Reilly, CW Perry School, Airdrie

Jim Reilly will become principal of CW Perry School in Airdrie, after spending four years at Bow Valley Secondary School, first as acting principal in 2018 and then as principal from 2019. He has also been a teacher and Acting Vice-Principal at Cochrane High School. and Vice-Principal at George McDougall Secondary School in Airdrie.

Reilly holds a Master of Education and a Bachelor of Education from the University of Calgary, as well as a Bachelor of Journalism with a minor in English from Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops and an Associate’s Degree in Music from Malaspina University- Middle School.

As an education leader, he strives to empower others and foster a culture of respect, caring, achievement and celebration.

Lindsay Adams, Edwards Primary School, Airdrie

Lindsay Adams will return to Edwards Primary School in Airdrie next year, where she held her first trustee role as vice principal from 2013.

Adams’ career in education began in 2004 in Ontario and she previously worked as a literacy coach, early reading intervention teacher and French immersion teacher. She was appointed to her first principal’s position at Elbow Valley Elementary School in 2016 and later as the first principal of Airdrie’s Northcott Prairie School in 2019.

She holds a Master of Education, Bachelor of Education, and Bachelor of Arts in Psychology/Sociology, all from Nipissing University, as well as her Leadership Quality Standards certification. While at RVS, she served as Chair of the French Immersion Benchmarks Committee and as a member of the Literacy and Numeracy Task Force.

Shannon Storey-Heffer, Langdon School, Langdon

Shannon Storey-Heffer will take up her first role as Head of SVR at Langdon School next year, having served as Vice-Principal and Acting Headmistress at East Lake Primary School in Chestermere since 2018.

A teacher at Chestermere Secondary School from 2003, Storey-Heffer became an administrator at RVS in 2017 as Vice-Principal of Bow Valley Secondary School in Cochrane, before joining East Lake.

Storey-Heffer holds a Master of Education in Business and Leadership from the University of New Brunswick, a Bachelor of Education in Social Studies from the University of Calgary, and a Bachelor of Arts in Human History. ‘King’s College/Dalhousie University.

A priority for Storey-Heffer is to better understand and support the social and mental well-being of students, while mentoring and mentoring teachers.

Devon Sawby, Northcott Prairie School, Airdrie

Devon Sawby will continue to lead Northcott Prairie School as principal after serving as the school’s acting principal in 2021-22. This will be Sawby’s first time as principal after becoming vice principal at Edwards Elementary School in 2016 and then vice principal at Bow Valley Secondary School in 2019.

Before becoming an administrator, Sawby taught social studies and French language arts at George McDougall High School for eight years beginning in 2008.

Sawby holds a Master of Arts in Educational Leadership and Management from Royal Roads University, as well as a Bachelor of Education and Bachelor of Humanities from the University of Calgary. She believes that all students can reach their learning potential when they are trusted and respected.

Tammy Rahn, Rainbow Creek Elementary School, Chestermere

Long-time RVS Administrator Tammy Rahn will leave her current position as Principal of Langdon School to become Principal of Rainbow Creek Elementary School in Chestermere. Rahn became a division administrator in 2008, assuming the role of vice-principal at Chestermere Lake Middle School. In 2010, she became principal of this school and later moved to Langdon School in 2017.

She first joined RVS as a teacher in 1995 and worked at Cochrane’s Mitford Middle School and Chestermere Lake Middle School. She began her teaching career as a special education teacher in Stony Plain, Alberta.

Rahn holds a Master of Education in Inclusion and Diversity Leadership from the University of Calgary and a Bachelor of Education with a specialization in Special Education from the University of Alberta. Rahn is a student-centered educator who is not afraid to try new learning approaches that will benefit students.

Glen Brooker, Springbank Middle School, Springbank

Glen Brooker will take on his first lead role at Springbank Middle School in August, having served as vice-principal at WH Croxford High School in Airdrie since 2019.

Brooker has been an RVS administrator since 2016, when he became vice-principal at Cochrane High School. Prior to that, he worked as a teacher or athletic director since 1998 at schools including Bert Church High School in Airdrie, Bow Valley High School and the RVS Building Futures program.

He holds a Masters of Education from the University of Victoria, a Bachelor of Education in History from the University of Alberta, and a Certificate in Distance Adult Education from the University of Calgary. . He believes that the foundation of learning is equity, diversity and inclusion for all learners.

Earl Castiglione, Westbrook School, Rocky View County

Earl Castiglione will become principal of Westbrook School after serving as vice-principal at Bert Church High School since 2018. A teacher and learning specialist since 1992 with Chinooks Edge School Division and the Calgary School Board, Castiglione joined RVS in 2017 as Deputy Headmaster at Sarah Thompson School in Langdon, before joining Bert Church the following year. This will be his first direction.

Castiglione holds a Master of Education in School Administration from the University of Saskatchewan, as well as a Bachelor of Education in Secondary English and a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Calgary.

Castiglione believes that an effective school offers young people the opportunity to understand the world, find opportunities and engage in personal growth.

“On behalf of the Board of Directors, congratulations to each of these Directors on their new assignment as Director,” said Fiona Gilbert, Board Chair, in the press release. “We appreciate their strong commitment to student success and their contributions as leaders in our schools and communities. »

In addition, the following individuals will take on new administrative roles within the division:

  • Shawna Neis – from principal of Prince of Peace Lutheran School in Rocky View County to vice principal of AE Bowers Elementary School in Airdrie.
  • Dan New – from Vice Principal of Prince of Peace Lutheran School to Vice Principal of Bert Church High School.
  • Tim Hasiuk – from principal of Millarville Community School to vice principal of Bow Valley High School.
  • Aaron Hiebart – from Vice-Principal of Brooks Junior High School to Vice-Principal of Chestermere High School.
  • Lesley-Anne Petcoff – from vice principal at WG Murdoch School in Crossfield to vice principal at Cochrane Secondary School.
  • Susan Noble – from Acting Vice-Principal of Bearspaw School to Vice-Principal of East Lake School.
  • Kelly Beaton – from Acting Deputy Director of RVS Community Learning Center (CLC) to Deputy Director of RVS CLC.
  • Tracy Lyons – from Vice-Principal of Cochrane High School to Vice-Principal of RVS CLC.
  • Gwen Dawes Harker – from Deputy Director of RVS CLC to Deputy Director of WG Murdoch.
  • Scott Thompson – from Acting Vice Principal of Bow Valley High School to Vice Principal of WH Croxford High School.

]]>
Dubai Cares and Innoventures Education will build schools for thousands of children in Malawi, Nepal and Senegal https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/dubai-cares-and-innoventures-education-will-build-schools-for-thousands-of-children-in-malawi-nepal-and-senegal/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 03:31:11 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/dubai-cares-and-innoventures-education-will-build-schools-for-thousands-of-children-in-malawi-nepal-and-senegal/ GIVE – Consolidated philanthropic initiative Innoventures Education is committed to providing ongoing support to causes chosen by students Dubai, United Arab Emirates: Education opens up a world of possibilities for children and has the potential to break the vicious cycle of poverty and inequality. Unfortunately, many children around the world do not have access to […]]]>
  • GIVE – Consolidated philanthropic initiative Innoventures Education is committed to providing ongoing support to causes chosen by students

Dubai, United Arab Emirates: Education opens up a world of possibilities for children and has the potential to break the vicious cycle of poverty and inequality. Unfortunately, many children around the world do not have access to quality education or drop out of school due to poor infrastructure. Recognizing their privilege as a responsibility, students from schools and nurseries run by Innoventures Education are working with Dubai Cares, part of the Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Global Initiatives, to help bridge the education gap by building four schools in Malawi, Senegal and Nepal, bringing the total to 9 GIVE-funded schools. Five schools had been built in Nepal and Malawi before the pandemic.

Dubai-based students have used ingenious ways to support Dubai Cares’ Adopt a School initiative, which aims to provide children and young people in developing countries with equal access to quality education. Students aged 3 to 18 raised funds throughout the year, with events such as walkathons, bake sales, festive markets, interclass competitions and costume days. Raffles World Academy, run by Innoventures Education, raised AED50,000 through an enthusiastic walk-a-thon.

A check for AED 632,000 was presented to His Excellency Dr. Tariq Al Gurg, Managing Director and Vice Chairman of Dubai Cares, at a lively reception on Monday morning attended by students and staff from Innoventures schools Education. The students collected half of the total amount of the donations, while the other half was paid by the board of directors of Innoventures Éducation.

HE Dr Al Gurg said, “Lack of access to effective learning opportunities has become an ever-expanding global crisis that requires everyone’s urgent attention. This is the message that the students of Innoventures Education have demonstrated with their remarkable fundraising efforts to help their peers in developing countries claim their basic human right to education. Their support will not only help deliver quality education to those who need our help the most, but will also serve as an example of the positive impact students can create when they take on their role as empowerment advocates. education. We are grateful to Innoventures Education for their enduring support of Dubai Cares and commend them for their efforts to instill the values ​​of responsibility, empathy and giving back to their student community.

The Gift of Innoventures Education (GIVE) is a consolidated philanthropic initiative committed to providing ongoing support for causes identified by students. Beyond fundraising, GIVE emphasizes a culture of voluntary service. Innoventures Education students traveled to Nepal to innovate in GIVE-sponsored schools, describing their experience as “transformational” and “eye-opening,” giving them a deeper sense of gratitude and understanding of other cultures.

Over AED 2.2 million has been raised by GIVE to date to help build five schools in partnership with Dubai Cares: three schools in Nepal and two schools in Malawi. This year, GIVE will support the construction of four additional schools: one in Malawi and Nepal, and two in Senegal. Schools will be equipped with gender-specific furniture and toilets to improve access to quality education in a clean and sanitary building.

Poonam Bhojani, CEO of Innoventures Education, said: “While improving the lives of those less fortunate than us, we are also building strong values ​​of global citizenship and empathy in our students, which are life skills. essential in the 21st century. Since the launch of the Gift of Innoventures Education (GIVE) initiative, it has been extremely rewarding to see how our school communities have worked together with organizations such as our long-standing partner Dubai Cares, to close the education gap. From identifying specific causes, raising funds for them, traveling to schools, working on construction sites and living with communities, our students have demonstrated a conscience and overall kindness. We are proud of their contributions and the passionate support of parents and teachers for the Dubai Cares Adopt-a-School initiative.

Diya Patel of Dubai International Academy Emirates Hills, who has been involved in building schools in Nepal, said: “The GIVE trip to Nepal was a life-changing experience that put into perspective characteristics of the real life such as education and the way of life we ​​take for granted. I realized there was no obstacle to connecting with people and creating happiness.

Thani Al Mehairi of Raffles World Academy said, “Holistic education instills in us students the importance of balanced learning with values. GIVE allowed us to understand, through a single channel, that we must take care of all humanity.

-Ends-

About Innoventures Education

Founded in 2004, Innoventures Education is committed to bringing world-class education to Dubai. It operates five schools, namely Dubai International Academy at Emirates Hills, Dubai International Academy at Al Barsha, Raffles World Academy, Raffles International School, Collegiate International School and nine Raffles Early Childhood Centers (ECCs) spread across Dubai. We offer the International Baccalaureate, American and British programs in our schools for children. We are open to enrolling children aged 45 days to 18 years old. One of the main features of our schools and ECCs is that we provide mother tongue education in 14 different languages ​​during the school day, including French and other European languages. All of our schools and ECCs are renowned for their high-quality programs, inspiring learning environments, and commitment to academic excellence. Together, we have a total enrollment of over 8,000 students from over 120 countries, with a dedicated and inspiring team of educators and administrators from virtually every corner of the globe.

About Dubai Cares:

Since its inception in 2007, Dubai Cares, part of the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Global Initiatives, has worked to provide children and young people in developing countries with access to quality education through the design and funding of programs that aim to be impactful, sustainable and scalable. To date, the UAE-based global philanthropic organization has successfully launched education programs reaching more than 21 million beneficiaries in 60 developing countries.

Dubai Cares plays a key role in achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 4, which aims to ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning for all. by 2030, by supporting early childhood development programmes, access to quality primary schools and secondary education, technical and vocational education and training for young people as well as a particular focus on education in emergencies and protracted crises. Additionally, Dubai Cares takes a strategic approach to improving student enrollment and learning outcomes through an integrated school health and nutrition model comprised of school-based deworming, school feeding and WASH activities ( water, sanitation and hygiene) in schools.

Dubai Cares is a member of the United Nations Department of Global Communications (UN DGC), as well as a non-governmental organization registered with IACAD, the regulatory body for charitable activities in Dubai. The UAE-based global philanthropic organization is authorized to raise funds through direct donations and fundraising campaigns, as well as handling all permit approvals with IACAD.

Volunteering is a powerful tool for Dubai Cares to engage people in addressing development challenges. Dubai Cares unites the entire UAE community through a wide range of volunteering and outreach initiatives related to its global mandate.

To learn more, please visit www.dubaicares.ae

]]>
Tour de France 2022 essential race preview: Who will win the yellow jersey? https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/tour-de-france-2022-essential-race-preview-who-will-win-the-yellow-jersey/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 06:36:56 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/tour-de-france-2022-essential-race-preview-who-will-win-the-yellow-jersey/ “], “filter”: { “nextExceptions”: “img, blockquote, div”, “nextContainsExceptions”: “img, blockquote”} }”> Don’t miss a moment of Paris-Roubaix and Unbound Gravel, Giro d’Italia, Tour de France, Vuelta a España, and everything in between when you >”,”name”:”in-content-cta”, “type “:”link”}}”>join Outside+. Appointment: July 1 to 24Steps: 21Days off: 3Begin: CopenhagenFinish: Paris The Tour de France 2022 begins with […]]]>

“], “filter”: { “nextExceptions”: “img, blockquote, div”, “nextContainsExceptions”: “img, blockquote”} }”>

Don’t miss a moment of Paris-Roubaix and Unbound Gravel, Giro d’Italia, Tour de France, Vuelta a España, and everything in between when you >”,”name”:”in-content-cta”, “type “:”link”}}”>join Outside+.

Appointment: July 1 to 24
Steps: 21
Days off: 3
Begin: Copenhagen
Finish: Paris

The Tour de France 2022 begins with a bang in Copenhagen and ends in style with its traditional laps on the Champs-Élysées.

In between there are 21 stages, over 3,500km of racing and enough drama and intrigue to fill a Netflix series… Oh wait.

The 109th edition of cycling’s most important stage race brings all the pageantry, prestige and pressure that comes with the annual race Big loop.

Summer’s annual big loop features unique twists, like most years, with the Tour’s most ambitious great departure to date in Denmark. There are new climbs, a return to the cobbles and new faces that promise to shed some light.

Read also :

Yet more than most sports, the actual Tour de France is bigger than any individual star. Or so the French like to believe, especially those who work inside the ASO building in the western suburbs of Paris.

The 2022 Tour will see a clash of Slovenians, with Primož Roglič armed and determined to beat compatriot Tadej Pogačar, who looks destined to rule the Tour roost for a while.

Behind the clash of the Jumbo-Visma titans against UAE Team Emirates, the proud lady of the Ineos Grenadiers peloton is determined to prove that she can still bend the Tour to her will. Bora-Hansgrohe is also trying to find a place in the elite.

The fight for yellow still dominates the narrative, but there will be plenty of subplots with the battle for the green jersey and the hunt for stage wins that can make or break a career.

The Tour never disappoints, but because expectations are often so high, it is rare for the race to fully satisfy.

A challenging route should keep things interesting all the way from Copenhagen to Paris. Let’s dive in:

Who can beat Tadej Pogacar?

The short answer: apparently just his own bad luck.

BikeNews ran the peloton in June at the Critérium du Dauphiné asking top pros if Pogačar had a weak point that a rival could exploit, and the universal answer was no.

“Tadej is a very complete driver, he is very good in all terrain. Every race he takes part in, he is the favourite, including for the Tour,” said last year’s runner-up Jonas Vingaard. “Of course we have to look at him and use our strength if we can find any weakness. I wouldn’t say he has any weaknesses.

Pogacar is the Superman of cycling. He can climb, time trial, sprint, handle his bike, handle pressure and hug babies too.

At 23, Pogačar has already won two yellow jerseys, and seems destined for many others.

Some saw Pogačar’s squad as a relative weakness, but new signings such as George Bennett and Marc Soler only bolster what is already a very good support system.

Read also: George Bennett’s ultimate challenge on the Tour

Everyone agrees that this is Pogačar’s race to lose, so the question arises, who can beat him?

First in line are Primož Roglič and Vingegaard. They have finished runners-up to Pogačar for the past two seasons, with Roglič suffering the crushing defeat in the final time trial of 2020. Last year, Vingegaard surprised to stay close to Pogačar for three weeks.

Jumbo-Visma go all-in with a deep squad, even though a COVID exit from the Tour de Suisse didn’t help. Outright domination at the Critérium du Dauphiné in June raised hopes that Jumbo-Visma would be ready.

Can a team be stronger than a runner? Jumbo-Visma bets on it.

Jumbo-Visma dominated the Dauphiné during a warm-up for the Tour. (Photo: DAVID STOCKMAN/BELGA MAG/AFP via Getty Images)

Behind these two behemoths is Ineos Grenadiers, the British super-team that has dominated the Tour for the better part of a decade. Without a confirmed winner like Chris Froome or the injured Egan Bernal, the team will struggle to match the Slovenians.

Adam Yates, Dani Martinez and perhaps a revived Geraint Thomas can push for the podium, and the team will benefit from the experience and knowledge that carried them to the heights during the peak years of the Wiggins / Froome era. , when the team won seven tours in eight years by four different riders.

Bora-Hansgrohe, comforted by his victory at the Giro d’Italia, will try to burst into the party with Aleksandr Vlasov. A podium would confirm the arrival of the team in the elite.

Behind them, the list gets pretty slim pretty quickly. Perhaps one of the “Class of 1990” will find new wings, with Thibaut Pinot, Nairo Quintana, or Romain Bardet. EF Education-EasyPost brings Rigoberto Urán and maybe Enric Mas can replace Movistar.

Week One: Steps to Press All Skills

Tour de France director Christian Prudhomme points to the bridge featured in stage 2. (Photo: MADS CLAUS RASMUSSEN/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images)

The 2022 Tour ventures into Denmark for three stages in what is the furthest start of the Tour in the history of the race.

The first yellow jersey is up for grabs in an old-school urban time trial course that should favor Filippo Ganna, Wout van Aert or Stefan Küng, GC favorites keen to limit losses or take gains.

There’s been a lot of talk about the first week of this year’s Tour, and rightly so. Two tricky road stages push the peloton into the plains of Denmark, with Stage 2 crossing a 20km bridge that could split in crosswinds. Stage 3 lays out narrow farm roads that will put the tension at the maximum level to avoid accidents.

The first week is for the sprinters, and once the Tour returns to France, stage 4 in Calais will see another chance for the fast finishers. The sprinters should have up to six or even seven chances in this Tour, but they will have to work for them after stage 4.

Read also: Could an 18km bridge ruin climbers’ GC hopes?

Stage 5 takes the Tour over the treacherous cobbled sections of Paris-Roubaix. Debate continues to rage over whether or not it is right to bring specialists and lean 65kg GC climbers onto the pavebut surviving this stage with fully intact GC options will prove decisive.

The first real selection of the GC arrives quickly in the arrival at the top of stage 7 at La Planche-des-Belles-Filles. This is where Pogačar crushed Roglič in a climbing time trial two years ago. This time, the time differences will not be as pronounced except for those who will lose the steering wheel.

Two transitional stages through Switzerland lead to the Tour’s first summit finish at Chätel les Portes du Soleil, a category-one climb that will separate the chafing from the wheat and prepare the Alps.

Week 2: return to Alpe d’Huez

The Tour returns to Alpe d’Huez for the first time since 2018. (Photo: JEFF PACHOUD/AFP via Getty Images)

The second week goes deep into the French Alps, with a stage with stage 10 climbing Megève with a second category summit finish.

Stage 11 includes the Lacetes de Montverrier, Col du Télégraphe and Col du Galibier for the HC summit at Col de Granon, the first of back-to-back summit finishes that perhaps put a standing order on the GC hierarchy.

Read also: In the long list of Ineos Grenadiers

Stage 12 returns to the famous switchbacks towards Alpe d’Huez, which should see the French in their climax to celebrate July 14th. The Galibier-Croix-de-Fer double sets the stage for a perhaps defining moment in this Tour, and it’s barely halfway.

The week ends with two transition stages favorable to breakaways to bring the peloton to the foot of the Pyrenees for the closing act.

Week 3: Pyrenees and final TT

Animation was not lacking in the Pyrenees. Photo: (Photo: Tim de Waele/Getty Images)

A transition stage will bring the peloton into the short but explosive 129.7 km 17th stage which rushes into the Col d’Aspin (12 km at 6.5%), the Hourquette d’Anzican (8.2 km at 5 .1%) and the Col de Val-Louron-Azet (10.7km at 6.8%) before climbing to Peyragudes (8km at 7.8%).

The last big final at the top of the Tour takes place in Hautacam, with passages over the Col d’Aubisque and the Col de Spandelles to organize the final battle. The Hautacam gets steeper the higher it goes and has often proved decisive on previous Tours.

Read also: All the details on the Tour de France 2022 route

The Tour is not over yet. Stage 19 should be a mass sprint, if there are any legs left in the peloton to chase. All the loose ropes will be tucked away in the 40.7km individual time trial from Lacapelle-Marival to Rocamadour. The hilly terrain has some minor uphills, so this is a course of pure power and for anyone with strong legs.

The fun ends for the final laps on the Champs-Élysées on July 24.

Podium of the Tour de France 2021

  1. Tadej Pogacar (United Arab Emirates team)
  2. Jonas Vingaard (Jumbo-Visma) at 5:20 a.m.
  3. Richard Carapaz (Ineos Grenadiers) at 7:03 a.m.

Green jersey: Mark Cavendish (Deceuninck-Quick-Step)

Climber’s jersey: Tadej Pogacar

Youth Jersey: Tadej Pogacar

best team: Bahrain-Victorious

The podium of the Tour de France 2021. (Photo: Garnier Étienne – Piscine/Getty Images)

Previous winners

2021 — Tadej Pogacar
2020 — Tadej Pogacar
2019 — Egan Bernal
2018 — Geraint Thomas
2017—Chris Froome
2016—Chris Froome
2015—Chris Froome
2014 — Vincenzo Nibali
2013—Chris Froome
2012—Bradley Wiggins

]]>
‘Politically invisible’: Temporary immigration skyrockets in Quebec as official goals remain unchanged https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/politically-invisible-temporary-immigration-skyrockets-in-quebec-as-official-goals-remain-unchanged/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 14:50:17 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/politically-invisible-temporary-immigration-skyrockets-in-quebec-as-official-goals-remain-unchanged/ While Quebec’s official immigration targets have remained largely stable over the past few years, the actual number of newcomers to the province has increased due to a growing reliance on temporary workers who often face more precarious conditions and long waits for permanent residency, a recent study found. The publication by the Institute of Quebec […]]]>

While Quebec’s official immigration targets have remained largely stable over the past few years, the actual number of newcomers to the province has increased due to a growing reliance on temporary workers who often face more precarious conditions and long waits for permanent residency, a recent study found.

The publication by the Institute of Quebec found that while non-permanent residents made up 9% of international immigration to the province from 2012 to 2016, that number jumped to 64% by 2019.

Three experts who spoke to The Canadian Press said growing temporary immigration can help businesses meet their needs in a tightening labor market, but the province needs to do more to adapt to the new reality in order to better serve both newcomers and its own objectives. .

In 2021, the nonprofit research institute found that there were nearly 177,000 workers in Quebec classified as “temporary,” made up of international students with work permits, temporary foreign workers and skilled workers. . Over the past four years, permanent immigration levels have been capped at 40,000 to 50,000 per year.

Need workers

Mia Homsy, an economist and co-author of the institute’s report, said the increase in temporary immigration is largely due to a shortage of labor as well as a growing number of students strangers.

She said that historically, temporary immigrants have not been a big part of the Quebec immigration debate, likely because they make up such a small percentage of the total.

“Now that the trend has changed and the reality is completely different, it’s important to know what’s going on,” she said.

Homsy said the increase in temporary immigration is good for the province because it allows businesses to fill needed jobs, especially in Quebec regions. It can also be a good thing for workers, as it can help them gain work experience and put them on the path to permanent residency.

However, many of them have closed permits, which means they are tied to one employer, “so their working conditions may be more precarious”, she said.

Adele Garnier, a geography professor at Laval University and a specialist in migration, says temporary immigrants face obstacles that permanent immigrants do not. These can include lower wages, poorer working conditions and a lack of information about their rights as workers.

For years, she said, she and other organizations have worked to eliminate closed work permits, which can make it harder for workers to fight abuse and can ‘lead to exploitation’ .

For Homsy, the biggest problem is the long wait times faced by temporary immigrants seeking permanent residency. Currently, she says, the wait time is 31 months, even for those who have already received a Quebec selection certificate — which can also take years.

Language barrier

Carlo Garcia, a 38-year-old worker from the Philippines, says his experience with the Canadian immigration system has been relatively smooth so far. Garcia, who works in information technology on a skilled worker visa in Sherbrooke, Que., said he is slowly learning French and hopes to one day become a permanent resident.

Although he was happy with the company that hired him, he said he wished he could get an open permit so he could take on extra work from other clients and earn more money to bring his wife and her two young children in Canada.

He said he plans to eventually move to another province because learning French – his third language – is a big challenge. But his gratitude to his employer and the city pushes him to stay.

“With the way (the company) helped us get here, as well as we’ve already connected with the people here, there’s a good chance I’ll stay here,” he said. .

Government efforts

Homsy and Garnier say the Quebec government is reluctant to have an open discussion about temporary immigration.

Garnier said that while temporary immigration has the advantage of being “relatively invisible politically” to a Coalition Avenir Québec government that has campaigned to limit immigration, it means Quebec is ignoring the newcomers when calculating demand for services such as public services, transit, education and health.

She said the government must also recognize that temporary immigration is not going to end anytime soon. “What worries me is the policy of sticking your head in the sand and acting like this is temporary,” Garnier said.

Although Quebec has taken steps to make it easier for them to arrive — such as easing restrictions on the number of temporary foreign workers a company can accept — temporary workers are officially chosen by the federal government and are less likely to arrive. speaking French. Eventually, Quebec hopes to be transferred control of the temporary worker program “in order to exercise greater control over this program and better meet the needs of Quebec and its regions”, indicated the provincial ministry of Immigration in an email.

Garnier and Homsy say the province needs to do more to make sure workers who want to stay have early access to French classes and make sure their terms of employment allow them to attend.

They also recommend the province increase its immigration targets, which could reduce wait times for permanent residency and create more certainty for businesses and workers. Homsy said the increase could come from a special program to fast-track applications from regions of Quebec with labor shortages, which could accept a few thousand immigrants per year in addition to the cap of 50,000 people per year. year.

Quebec Immigration Minister Jean Boulet has rejected raising the 2022 immigration target beyond its current level of 50,000, which he says is the maximum the province can. properly integrate.

The e-mail from the Department of Immigration indicated that the thresholds for future years will be set at the time of the fall provincial election campaign.

]]>
Albany teacher and 13 students injured in tourist bus crash in France https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/albany-teacher-and-13-students-injured-in-tourist-bus-crash-in-france/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 00:57:21 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/albany-teacher-and-13-students-injured-in-tourist-bus-crash-in-france/ A tour bus carrying dozens of Albany teenagers on an educational trip to France slammed into a truck at a rest area on Friday, trapping and seriously injuring a teacher, throwing students from their seats and spitting shrapnel drink on the bus. Thirteen students also suffered injuries – from cuts to broken bones – according […]]]>

A tour bus carrying dozens of Albany teenagers on an educational trip to France slammed into a truck at a rest area on Friday, trapping and seriously injuring a teacher, throwing students from their seats and spitting shrapnel drink on the bus. Thirteen students also suffered injuries – from cuts to broken bones – according to authorities.

The bus was carrying 37 people, mostly high school students, on the sixth day of an annual 10-day tour organized by an Albany middle school French teacher who was reportedly seriously injured. His condition and the nature of his injuries were not immediately known.

A spokesperson for EF Education Tours, which organized the tour, confirmed the accident and said it had sent a team of five to help communicate with families and offer advice to students who were in the bus.

“We are shocked and saddened by what happened,” Adam Bickelman said. “Our thoughts are with those who have been injured and we are doing everything we can to support everyone involved during this difficult time.”

According to L’Indépendant, a French newspaper, the accident happened at the Vinassan rest area near Lyon’s A-9 highway when the bus collided with a heavy cargo truck, similar to a big American truck.

]]>
Seminar on Vietnam-France Economic Relations | Company https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/seminar-on-vietnam-france-economic-relations-company/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/seminar-on-vietnam-france-economic-relations-company/ A preview of the seminar (Photo: VNA) Paris (VNA) – A seminar on economic relations between Vietnam and France and the investment projects of the latter in the former was recently held in the city of Montpellier, in the south of France, in online format and in person. Speaking at the event, Vietnamese Ambassador to […]]]>
A preview of the seminar (Photo: VNA)

Paris (VNA) – A seminar on economic relations between Vietnam and France and the investment projects of the latter in the former was recently held in the city of Montpellier, in the south of France, in online format and in person.

Speaking at the event, Vietnamese Ambassador to France Dinh Toan Thang said that over the past five decades, friendship and cooperation between the two countries have witnessed positive, diverse and substantial in the fields of politics, economy, culture and education.

France is currently Vietnam’s second largest investor in the European Union (EU) with a total registered capital of over $3.6 billion, mainly in production and real estate.

However, it has advantages in telecommunications, renewable energy, environment, biomedicine, manufacturing, infrastructure and logistics, all of which are in line with Vietnam’s foreign investment attraction guidelines, Thang said.

He expressed his belief that with Vietnamthe country’s potential and strengths as well as the determination of its government, the country’s collaboration with France in general and Montpellier in particular will see breakthroughs.

The diplomat pledged to serve as a bridge connecting the two countries and their partners to boost cooperation for sustainable development.

Diane Belle, vice-president of the Junior Economic Chamber of Montpellier, said that French companies are interested in the Vietnamese market because they see many opportunities for mutual development.

She proposed that the two sides find ways to overcome obstacles such as cultural and social differences for better understanding, and not only focus on investment in production, but also pay attention to the development of other sectors such as services or support industries./.

ANV

]]>
Junior Cert French: a teacher concerned about the question of a girl with Down syndrome https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/junior-cert-french-a-teacher-concerned-about-the-question-of-a-girl-with-down-syndrome/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 18:37:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/junior-cert-french-a-teacher-concerned-about-the-question-of-a-girl-with-down-syndrome/ A question on the French junior cycle newspaper about a girl discussing her sister with Down syndrome has raised concerns, teacher Ann Bruddell said. s Bruddell said, “While it is good to see inclusion front and center, to do so in a modern junior cycle foreign language article is problematic.” “In 2022, courses, including language […]]]>

A question on the French junior cycle newspaper about a girl discussing her sister with Down syndrome has raised concerns, teacher Ann Bruddell said.

s Bruddell said, “While it is good to see inclusion front and center, to do so in a modern junior cycle foreign language article is problematic.”

“In 2022, courses, including language courses, are more inclusive. It is very likely that some students with Down syndrome or other specific learning difficulties have taken this exam,” she said.

She added that “from a pragmatic point of view, although most students will have heard of Down syndrome, many will not know exactly what it is. Apart from the introductions in English and French, there is no information about this in the article”.

Ms Bruddell is the Subject Representative of the Association of Secondary Teachers’ Ireland (ASTI) and the President of the Association of French Teachers in Ireland.

Although there was some concern and uncertainty ahead of the first of the new junior cycle French exam, the paper was fairly fair and in line with what was expected, she said.

“The clarity, pacing and questions from the listening section were very on point,” Ms. Brudell said.

Ms Brudell said the written section allowed more able students to push themselves further.

Most of the questions in the reading section were fair and of an appropriate level of difficulty, but it was the section with the magazine featuring an interview with a 14-year-old talking about her life with her 16-year-old sister who has Down Syndrome.

]]>
Emmanuel Macron’s coalition level with a new leftist group in the French elections | France https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/emmanuel-macrons-coalition-level-with-a-new-leftist-group-in-the-french-elections-france/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 22:33:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/emmanuel-macrons-coalition-level-with-a-new-leftist-group-in-the-french-elections-france/ Emmanuel Macron’s centrist group was neck and neck with a new left-wing alliance led by hard-left Jean-Luc Mélenchon in the vote share of the first round of legislative elections, according to initial projections. A final week of frantic campaigning will begin ahead of the second round on Monday, as Macron’s centrists still hope to gain […]]]>

Emmanuel Macron’s centrist group was neck and neck with a new left-wing alliance led by hard-left Jean-Luc Mélenchon in the vote share of the first round of legislative elections, according to initial projections.

A final week of frantic campaigning will begin ahead of the second round on Monday, as Macron’s centrists still hope to gain a head start but face uncertainty over their ability to win a crucial majority of seats in parliament.

A historic alliance of left-wing parties, led by Mélenchon’s La France Insoumise party and comprising the Socialists and Greens, was slightly ahead with 25.6% – a strong showing that presents a challenge to Macron. The centrist alliance of the president, Ensemble (Ensemble), should collect 25.2% of the votes, according to estimates by Ipsos-Sopra Steria for France Télévisions.

Turnout on Sunday would have hit a record high of around 47%, according to polling firms’ projections, after candidates described voters’ mood as angry and disillusioned with the political class. Olivia Grégoire, the government spokeswoman, said low turnout was the “key problem”.

Macron, who was re-elected president in April against far-right Marine Le Pen, needs a majority for his centrist group in the National Assembly to have a free hand on his proposals for tax cuts and changes to the social protection system.

The parliamentary results will set the balance of power for Macron’s second term, defining his ability to implement national policies such as raising the retirement age and overhauling the benefits system.

Mélenchon’s alliance – known as Nupes, or New Popular Ecological and Social Union – seeks to increase its seats and reduce the number of Macron’s centrists. The coalition’s platform includes a significant increase in the minimum wage, a lowering of the retirement age to 60 and a freeze on staple food and energy prices to tackle the cost crisis of life.

France’s first-past-the-post voting system, based on constituencies, means the exact number of seats for each group remains difficult to predict. The shape of the new parliament will only become clear after the second round on June 19.

Based on early estimates, Ispos predicted that Macron’s centrist alliance would win the largest share of parliament’s 577 seats – between 255 and 295 seats. This suggested there was a chance they might not achieve an outright majority, which requires 289 seats.

If Macron’s party and his allies fail to win a majority, it would be a setback for the president and could lead to messy bill deals with right-wing parties in parliament or an unwanted cabinet reshuffle.

The left alliance could take between 150 and 190 seats, according to Ipsos.

Macron and the ministers had stepped up their campaign this week, warning that Mélenchon was dangerous and an extremist who would kill the European Union, “align with Russia” and add to “global disorder”.

Le Pen’s far-right National Rally party, which won eight seats in 2017, hopes this time to win at least 15 seats, allowing it to form a parliamentary group and gain greater visibility in the National Assembly. Ipsos suggested the party could take up to 45 seats. Although Le Pen came second in the presidential election with an all-time high of 41%, the first-past-the-post voting system for parliament has historically proven difficult for her party in legislative elections.

Sign up for First Edition, our free daily newsletter – every weekday morning at 7am BST

Le Pen, from the stronghold of Hénin-Beaumont in northern France, called on her voters to run for her party against what she called Macron’s “brutal” political style. She said France was suffering, citing the cost of living crisis as well as the treatment of England fans in the Champions League final in Paris, seen as damaging to France’s image abroad .

Le Pen’s new far-right rival, former TV pundit Eric Zemmour, was knocked out in the first round after running in a constituency around Saint-Tropez in southern France.

The first weeks of the new government have been tense ahead of parliamentary elections, with hospital strikes and concerns over the cost of living, and Macron has been accused by Ukraine of being too accommodating to Russia .

Macron’s new disability minister, Damien Abad, faced two rape charges – which he denied – but which sparked street protests against women’s rights, while the new prime minister, Élisabeth Borne , has yet to have an impact.

Borne, who is running for the first time in a Norman seat, was well placed for the second round.

Jean-Michel Blanquer, Macron’s former education minister, was eliminated in the first round in Loiret.

Macron has made it clear that incumbent ministers who stand for election will have to resign if they lose.

]]>