French schools – Lycee Paul Claudel http://lycee-paul-claudel.com/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 15:41:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png French schools – Lycee Paul Claudel http://lycee-paul-claudel.com/ 32 32 Morning update: Learning French should be part of CEO’s performance review, says Freeland at Air Canada https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/morning-update-learning-french-should-be-part-of-ceos-performance-review-says-freeland-at-air-canada/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 12:10:55 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/morning-update-learning-french-should-be-part-of-ceos-performance-review-says-freeland-at-air-canada/ Hello, Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland said learning to speak French should be part of the performance appraisal of Air Canada CEO Michael Rousseau, shaking himself because of his inability to speak the language. In a letter to Air Canada President Vagn Soerensen on Monday, Ms Freeland also said the airline should make the ability […]]]>

Hello,

Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland said learning to speak French should be part of the performance appraisal of Air Canada CEO Michael Rousseau, shaking himself because of his inability to speak the language.

In a letter to Air Canada President Vagn Soerensen on Monday, Ms Freeland also said the airline should make the ability to communicate in French one of the qualifications of anyone in a managerial position within the company.

The unusual specter of a high-ranking elected official scolding the president of a listed company underlines tensions in Quebec over the thorny issue of the protection and promotion of the French language in Canada’s second most populous province . Quebec is in the process of strengthening its language laws to counter what is seen as a constant rise of English in advertising, culture and business.

New CEO of Air Canada, Michael Rousseau, delivering a speech at the Montreal Chamber of Commerce, November 3, 2021. IMAGES FROM THE CANADIAN PRESS / Mario BeauregardMario Beauregard / The Canadian Press

This is the daily Morning Update newsletter. If you are reading this on the web, or if someone has forwarded it to you, you can sign up for Morning Update and over 20 other Globe newsletters on our newsletter subscription page.

Future of Rogers senior executives still unclear after court ruling

A BC Supreme Court ruling has raised uncertainty over who sits on the board of directors of Rogers Communications Inc., but the future of the telecommunications and media giant’s management team remains uncertain, as Joe Natale remains at the helm of the company more than a month after the company president Edward Rogers tried to oust him.

Analysts said yesterday that Edward Rogers could preserve the management team at least until the proposed $ 26 billion takeover of Shaw Communications Inc. is complete. However, Bank of Montreal analyst Tim Casey said in a research note that “the relationship between the chairman and chief executive officer remains a concern for shareholders.”

Harassment of Hong Kong activists “never stops”, even for those now living in Canada

Alison Lai’s grandfather arrived as a refugee in Hong Kong seven decades ago, trading the chaos of 1950s China for the security of what was then a British colony. In 2020, China also made Ms. Lai a refugee.

The pro-democracy activist fled Hong Kong, her hometown, to Canada last year as Beijing tightened its grip on the territory it had acquired from Britain in 1997.

But like many activists in Hong Kong, a new start in Canada does not mean the end of the harassment and attacks by the Chinese Communist Party and its proxies.

Got a topical tip you’d like us to review? Write to us at advice@globeandmail.com Need to share documents securely? Contact us via SecureDrop


ALSO ON OUR RADAR

The Crown violated the 1850 land treaty with the First Nations, the rules of the Ontario court: The Ontario Court of Appeal ordered compensation that could reach billions of dollars after ruling that the Crown violated the terms of an 1850 treaty by capping annual payments at a few dollars per person to Indigenous peoples who ceded a large area in the northern part of the province.

Former Globe Journalist Wins Scotiabank Giller Award: Omar El Akkad won the 2021 Scotiabank Giller Award for What a strange paradise, a novel which, he says, was inspired by the Mediterranean migrant crisis and also by what was happening on the southern border of the United States under then-President Donald Trump.

Older Canadians cling to their jobs – for now: Faced with a deadly pandemic and full of cash, millions more Americans than usual have chosen to retire. Canadians did not follow their example. According to Statistics Canada data, fewer Canadians voluntarily left their jobs to retire during much of the COVID-19 crisis compared to typical levels before the pandemic.

The crypto sector is now attracting major institutional capital: Two large investments in crypto companies by Canada’s largest pension funds are the clearest indicators to date that institutional money from this country is seriously interested in the world of digital assets, according to observers of the. industry.

COP26 discusses how to plan for the inevitable consequences of climate change: One of the main sources of tension at COP26 took center stage yesterday, as the focus shifted to preparing for the consequences of climate change that are already inevitable, especially in the poorest countries. who will face the worst of these impacts.

  • Editorial: Canada has almost eliminated its dependence on coal. The rest of the world? Not really

More schools providing menstrual products for free: A growing movement to fight menstrual poverty has taken hold in schools across Canada, with a number of provincial governments providing free menstrual products to students in the privacy of their school washrooms. The goal is to make sure that students don’t miss class time or lose focus if they have their period unexpectedly during a school day and don’t have a pad or tampon. at hand.


MORNING MARKETS

World markets on hold: Spurred on by a US $ 1 trillion infrastructure bill, global stock markets held the line near their all-time highs on Tuesday, but investors were reluctant to embark on the recovery any further until they had a picture clearer of the surge in US inflation. At around 5:30 a.m. ET, the UK FTSE 100 rose 0.14%. The German DAX and the French CAC 40 gained 0.26% and 0.23% respectively. In Asia, the Japanese Nikkei fell 0.75%. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng rose 0.20%. Wall Street futures were stable. The Canadian dollar was trading at 80.44 US cents.


WHAT EVERYONE IS TALKING

André Picard: “COVID-19 delivered a brutal message: we practice apartheid for seniors in Canada, by directing far too many seniors to institutional care. Now that we have data to show it, the problem will be harder to ignore and, hopefully, become a political and societal priority.

Eric Reguly: “Even though [Elon] Musk does not sign a check, the [UN World Food Programme] has already won. Twitter sparring between perhaps the world’s most famous businessman and [WFP executive director David] Beasley has shone the spotlight on food emergencies erupting in Africa and beyond. This ad can generate more private donations and show the world that food for the poor is more important than electric cars for the rich. “


TODAY’S EDITORIAL EVENT

Brian GableBrian Gable / The Globe and Mail


LIVE BETTER

Three Ways You Could Unknowingly Sabotage Your Workouts

If you show up regularly but still aren’t seeing results, consider these subtle self-sabotaging methods that are all too common in the fitness world.


MOMENT IN TIME: NOVEMBER 9, 2004

Swedish journalist and author Stieg Larsson, November 11, 1998.Jan Collsioo / SCANPIX SWEDEN / AFP via AP

Swedish novelist Stieg Larsson has died aged 50

Swedish journalist and future novelist Stieg Larsson was 50 when he suffered a fatal heart attack that day in 2004. Due to a broken elevator, he had climbed several flights of stairs. It was a tragedy – he had his entire literary life ahead of him. A respected Muckraker and an expert on the radical right-wing movement in Sweden, Larsson turned to fiction to generate a retirement nest egg. For a penny, for a crown, he imagined an ambitious 10-volume series of thrillers in which a disgraced journalist uncovers criminal plots with the help of an asocial and tech-savvy young woman. Larsson had written three books and delivered the manuscripts to his publisher before his death. In 2005, The girl with the dragon tattoo (the first in the Millennium Trilogy) became an international bestseller, as did the hit sequels, The girl who played with fire and The girl who kicked the hornet’s nest. Because Larsson lacked a will, his family and longtime partner Eva Gabrielsson fought for his jackpot editing income. Detective novels pay off, as does good estate planning. Brad wheeler


Read today’s horoscopes. Enjoy today’s puzzles.


If you would like to receive this newsletter by email every weekday morning, go here register. If you have any comments, send us a note.


Source link

]]>
School board offering information sessions on local French immersion programs https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/school-board-offering-information-sessions-on-local-french-immersion-programs/ Sun, 07 Nov 2021 21:07:54 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/school-board-offering-information-sessions-on-local-french-immersion-programs/ Virtual meetings offered by Ferndale Woods, Hillcrest, Oakley Park and Warnica in Barrie PRESS RELEASESIMCOE COUNTY DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD*************************The Simcoe County District School Board offers French Immersion (FI) in select Simcoe County schools starting in grade one. The objective of the FI program is to enable students to communicate in French with a high level […]]]>

Virtual meetings offered by Ferndale Woods, Hillcrest, Oakley Park and Warnica in Barrie

PRESS RELEASE
SIMCOE COUNTY DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
*************************
The Simcoe County District School Board offers French Immersion (FI) in select Simcoe County schools starting in grade one. The objective of the FI program is to enable students to communicate in French with a high level of competence, allowing them to function with ease in English and French.

Information sessions for families planning to enter FI 1st year for the 2022-2023 school year will be held virtually in November at 6 p.m. on the following evenings:

School Date hour
Cameron Street PS
575 Cameron Street, Collingwood
Tuesday 23 November
Ernest Cumberland ES
160 Eighth Avenue, Alliston
Monday 22 November
Ferndale Wood ES
170 Ferndale Drive South, Barrie
Tuesday November 16
Forest Hill PS
20 Doran Road, Midhurst
Thursday 25 November
Goodfellow PS
827 9th line, Innisfil
Tuesday 23 November
Harriett Todd PS
11 George Street, Orillia
Tuesday 23 November
Hillcrest PS
184 Toronto Street, Barrie
Tuesday 23 November
Mundy’s Bay PS
340 Sixth Street, Midland
Monday November 15th
Oakley Park PS
22 Davidson Street, Barrie
Monday 22 November
PM ES Day
410 Maplegrove Ave, Bradford
Monday 22 November
Warnica PS
211 Warnica Road, Barrie
Tuesday November 16
Worsley ES
31- 40th Street South, Wasaga Beach
Tuesday 23 November

Entry into the FI program will be determined by a digital random lottery system. A link to access the FI Grade 1 online application form will be available from 9 a.m. on Wednesday, December 1 until 4 p.m. on Friday, December 17. Once available, you will find the application link on the SCDSB website.

Registration for the 1st year FI program is limited to a maximum of 40 students per designated FI site. While every effort is made to accommodate all FI applications, the space and staff available will determine the number of students who can be enrolled. Parents / guardians can contact their school in advance if they do not have internet access at home or need assistance accessing the online application.

Transportation is available to students enrolled in FI programs at their designated Francophone site where the student resides outside of that school’s walking area. Centralized community bus stops will be established to allow students to follow the specialized program.

It is the parent / guardian’s responsibility to transport the student to and from the central stop at designated times for pickup and drop-off. For more information, please refer to Policy 2410 – Student Transportation and Administrative Procedures Memorandum A1225 – Student Transportation – Courtesy Riders on Commuter Transportation and Program.

Please note that the sites designated for FI may change during the course of the program, which may also include sharing the program between two different sites.

*************************


Source link

]]>
Friday November 5: Pura Fé brings a mix of music from several indigenous cultures to Rock Aa’kw. Juneau Community Schools Fall Course Program. Jason Gootee, presenter of this Friday’s UAS Egan conference on health insurance. Liyuan “Sunny” Zhang introduced the artist to the Juneau Artists Gallery https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/friday-november-5-pura-fe-brings-a-mix-of-music-from-several-indigenous-cultures-to-rock-aakw-juneau-community-schools-fall-course-program-jason-gootee-presenter-of-this-fridays-uas-egan-confe/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 23:48:53 +0000 Pura Fé won a Native American Music Award, known as “Nammy” for Best Female Artist for “Follow Your Hearts Desire”. She also won a French Grammy, an L’académie Charles Cros award for her album ‘Tuscarora Nation Blues’ (Photo courtesy of Jack Storm Photography). The name of Pura Fé means “pure faith”. And like many performers […]]]>
Pura Fé won a Native American Music Award, known as “Nammy” for Best Female Artist for “Follow Your Hearts Desire”. She also won a French Grammy, an L’académie Charles Cros award for her album ‘Tuscarora Nation Blues’ (Photo courtesy of Jack Storm Photography).

The name of Pura Fé means “pure faith”. And like many performers at the Rock Aak’w Indigenous Music Festival, which begins Friday, she is both an artist and an activist.

This Friday afternoon in Juneau, she talks about bringing contemporary Indigenous music to the forefront of the mainstream music industry.

Also in this program:

  • Juneau Community School is adding in-person classes to its fall schedule.
  • Liyuan “Sunny” Zhang, featured artist at Juneau Artists Gallery in November.
  • Tonight’s UAS Egan Conference Examines Health Insurance Challenges In Alaska

Rhonda McBride hosts Friday’s program. You catch Juneau Afternoon, Tuesday through Friday, 3:00 p.m. on KTOO Juneau 104.3, online at ktoo.org, and repeated at a new time, 7:00 p.m. on KTOO.


Source link

]]>
After 196 years, college grants tenure to black professor https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/after-196-years-college-grants-tenure-to-black-professor/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 02:12:52 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/after-196-years-college-grants-tenure-to-black-professor/ Louisiana’s oldest college celebrates its first lifetime nomination to a black faculty member and explains why this racial milestone took nearly two centuries to accomplish. “I think that’s the million dollar question. I know this is something that will be highlighted and discussed ”at the Centenary College of Louisiana event on Thursday in honor of […]]]>

Louisiana’s oldest college celebrates its first lifetime nomination to a black faculty member and explains why this racial milestone took nearly two centuries to accomplish.

“I think that’s the million dollar question. I know this is something that will be highlighted and discussed ”at the Centenary College of Louisiana event on Thursday in honor of now tenured Associate Professor Andia Augustin-Billy, said the spokesperson for university, Kate Pedrotty.

Racism is the reason it took 196 years, school archivist Chris Brown said. “Structural, institutional and systemic racism has been present since the founding of the college, largely by slavers,” he said.

That story is undeniable, but it is also a thing of the past, said Christopher Holoman, president of the Methodist Affiliate Quorum at Shreveport.

“Any institution as old as Centenary, especially the one in the South, must take into account the role that racism has played in its history,” Holoman said. “As we move forward, Centenary is committed to fully including all members of our community and to working for a just society.”

Augustin-Billy, known on campus as “Dr. AB”, pronounced “ah-bay,” is an award-winning teacher of French and Francophone studies who leads Centennial students on trips to Paris and Haiti, where she grew up as the daughter of missionaries.

She also teaches African and Caribbean literature and postcolonial studies, women, gender and sexuality to a student body described as 18% Black or Black and one other race. That’s slightly ahead of the national percentage of college-aged blacks: 16.7% of U.S. residents aged 18 to 24 in 2018, according to U.S. Census figures.

Zuri Jenkins, a black senior majoring in international, French and English business who sits with Brown on the diversity committee, said she was both surprised and not surprised when she got her tenure in February.

Surprised because she saw the school grow for diversity – but there is also the story of Centenary: it was not only built on slavery but only admitted white males for years thereafter, Jenkins said.

Centenary was also among the last in Louisiana to integrate, admitting its first black students in 1966. Louisiana State University admitted its first black law student in 1950 and its undergraduate African American in 1953. Louisiana Tech has integrated in 1965 and Louisiana College, a small Baptist school, in 1967.

Fred Bonner II, identified by Brown as Centenary’s first black teacher, agreed the school is plagued by racism from the past, but said it was “really trying to move the needle in a positive direction.”

Bonner has fond memories of Centenary in 1997-98, when he was an instructor during the last semester of his doctoral work at the University of Arkansas, then visiting associate professor. At the time, he only knew one black student who was not on the basketball team. But he enjoyed the weekly faculty dinners, and the white students applauded him when he got his doctorate and told them “I’m Dr. Bonner now.”

The day after her tenure, Augustin-Billy asked the archivist if there had been any other tenured black professors, so that she could thank them for leading the way.

“There was no one there,” she said.

There does not appear to be any national data on which graduate schools have never granted full tenure to blacks.

The first two African Americans to become tenured in predominantly white schools did so in 1947 and 1952, according to The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education. But according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics, dozens of universities and colleges reported having no full black faculty members from 2012 to 2020.

All but three of these schools had fewer than 3,000 students. Centenary is among the smallest, with a current staff of 523 and 54 full-time faculty members. Two full-time faculty members and one of 27 part-time faculty members identify as black or African American, Pedrotty said.

“We don’t employ a large number of teachers. In addition, African-American teachers are in great demand. We do our best to be competitive with all of our faculty hires, ”said Holoman.

African Americans made up 13.3% of students nationwide in 2019, but only about 6% of faculty members, according to data from the U.S. Department of Education. A study of 2003 data showed that 47% of full-time white teachers were tenured, compared to 38.3% of full-time black teachers, reported the Journal of Blacks in Higher Education.

Disputes over the tenure of black professors this year focused on the University of North Carolina, which offered an endowed chair in journalism to Pulitzer-winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones, but discussions over tenure were stalled. after a board member questioned his non-academic background and a powerful donor opposed it. . She was eventually offered tenure, but took a position at Howard University.

Professors typically have to teach for five or six years in tenure-track positions before such decisions are made. Centenary offered Bonner a tenure-track position, but he chose a similar offer at Bowling Green State University that better matched his research interests. Today he is Regent Professor at Prairie View A&M and editor of a series of books called “Diverse Faculty in the Academy”.

Bonner said Centenary should point out that Shreveport’s population is 50% black when recruiting minority faculty.

“From my own experience and the writings I have read and edited, for the color school one of the most important things is support” both on and off a predominantly white campus. , “because you feel so isolated,” he said.

Augustin-Billy said he recently met a 71-year-old woman who said she and other family members had all attended Grambling State University, a historically black institution nearly two hours away. “The centenary was not for us.… We never felt like it was our space, our place,” the woman told him.

“I hope this story will spark a much needed dialogue about the presence of black academics in academia,” Augustin-Billy said. “There must be. There must be.”

————————————————– ———-
Keep in touch with us anytime, anywhere.

To join the newsroom or report a typo / correction, click HERE.

Sign up for newsletters sent by email to your inbox. Choose from these options: Latest News, Evening News Headlines, Latest COVID-19 Headlines, Morning News Headlines, Special Offers

Follow us on twitter

Like us on facebook

Follow us on Instagram

Subscribe to our Youtube channel



Source link

]]>
Missing girl found alive and in good health; Man in custody has no connection to Cleo’s family https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/missing-girl-found-alive-and-in-good-health-man-in-custody-has-no-connection-to-cleos-family/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 22:20:35 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/missing-girl-found-alive-and-in-good-health-man-in-custody-has-no-connection-to-cleos-family/ Criminologist Xanthe Mallett told Today police deserve to be applauded for the successful completion of a very complex investigation. “There was a lack of technological assistance. There were no CCTV cameras, there were no camera footage on people’s cars, it wasn’t in the suburbs for example,” said Associate Professor Mallett. “The police have a lot […]]]>

Criminologist Xanthe Mallett told Today police deserve to be applauded for the successful completion of a very complex investigation.

“There was a lack of technological assistance. There were no CCTV cameras, there were no camera footage on people’s cars, it wasn’t in the suburbs for example,” said Associate Professor Mallett.

“The police have a lot of people of interest to watch out for. Anyone on the campsite, anyone with family traveling there. Anyone with a relevant criminal background in the local community. There were a lot of leads to follow. in the beginning.”

She said the police had chosen the right path by bringing in a large task force early.

They learned some of the mistakes of other child abduction cases here and abroad and decided not to allow that to happen in Cleo’s case, ”she said.

“The feeling was that Cleo would be the next William Tyrrell and the next Madeleine McCann. We’ll never know what happened.”

Associate Professor Mallett also criticized online trolls who targeted Cleo’s family following her disappearance, saying that kind of pressure can “break a family.”

“It puts them under pressure day in and day out with everyone watching them,” she said.

Police said throughout the investigation that they did not suspect Cleo’s family had anything to do with her disappearance.


Source link

]]>
Bonner County History – October 31, 2021 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/bonner-county-history-october-31-2021/ Sun, 31 Oct 2021 08:00:07 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/bonner-county-history-october-31-2021/ From the archives of the Bonner County History Museum 611 S. Ella Ave., Sandpoint, Idaho, 83864 208-263-2344 50 years ago Sandpoint News Bulletin Oct. 31, 1971 – NEWS FROM THE HIGH SENIOR The SHS Ski Club is planning a ski show on November 18th. There will be a ski swap, fashion show, ski movies and […]]]>


From the archives of the

Bonner County History Museum

611 S. Ella Ave., Sandpoint, Idaho, 83864

208-263-2344

50 years ago

Sandpoint News Bulletin

Oct. 31, 1971 – NEWS FROM THE HIGH SENIOR

The SHS Ski Club is planning a ski show on November 18th. There will be a ski swap, fashion show, ski movies and a draw for a Schweitzer season pass.

Another second year fundraising project will be the sale of carmelées (sic) apples. There’s a night’s work Wednesday at Bev Wright’s to make the apples. Participating in Janet Snedden, Judy Moon, Patricia Davis, Lea Sammons and Hanna Munson.

The US government’s study at SHS has a new dimension. About 220 seniors study the Sandpoint News-Bulletin every Thursday, the day it is published. Merle Parsley teaches five classes, Terry Iverson, three, and Dick Curtis, one. Richard Frymire, a man from Clark Fork, teaches in Iverson’s room.

Mr. Leroy Anderson’s commercial art class works on ancient manuscript lettering skills. Students first find a saying from the Bible, then write it freehand in Old English or Gothic letters, illuminating the first letter of the paragraphs.

Miss Marianne Brown’s sophomore classes work on short stories, vocabulary and spelling.

•••

PURCHASE THE SCHOOL OF MILITARY LAW

Lieutenant James L. Baldwin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Baldwin, Sandpoint, graduated from the Judge Advocate General’s School of the United States Army in Charlottesville, Virginia. Baldwin was one of 72 graduates who graduated after an 8-week crash course in military legal practice, which prepares lawyers for any assignment in the body of the Judge Advocate General.

100 years ago

Reviews on the Pend d’Oreille

October 31, 1921 – PATENTS OF THE CITY

Dr OF Page removed Peter Johnson’s tonsils on Monday at the city hospital.

HS Remer, “Dad” Hartman and OL Peavey are back from a week of hunting across the Granite Creek Ditch. Game was plentiful, but the weather was so miserable that they didn’t have much time outside and so were “only wet in the back”.

The state rural school supervisor visited some of the county schools with the county superintendent. Mrs. Tuck. Among those visited was Thornton School, near Hope, where 40 students attend in overcrowded conditions.

●●●

NIMRODS GET BIG BEAR

Sunday, Chas. County Engineer Tigglebeck George Buchanan and Wm. Keller visited Upper Lightning Creek on a hunting expedition and brought home the carcass of a 450-pound black bear, one of the most big bears killed in this section for some time. “It almost broke my back to help Buck and Charley hold on,” Keller said. “I haven’t been able to wear a tie since, my shoulders hurt so much.”

●●●

THE PAGES GO TO EUROPE

Dr and Ms OF Page departed for New York on Wednesday, where they plan to stay for a short time and then sail to mainland Europe to spend the winter. The doctor expects to attend French and German medical and surgical schools and clinics, and Ms. Page will continue her work in vocal culture.

For more information, visit the museum online at bonnercountyhistory.org.


Source link

]]>
The 2021 Festival of Words will be a virtual event https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/the-2021-festival-of-words-will-be-a-virtual-event/ Sat, 30 Oct 2021 02:42:53 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/the-2021-festival-of-words-will-be-a-virtual-event/ After much discussion, Festival of Words has decided to stay virtual for security reasons, according to their press release. The Festival is celebrating another year with three incredible artists and two days of memorable events, they say. The Word Festival is scheduled for Friday and Saturday November 5 and 6. This year the festival will […]]]>

After much discussion, Festival of Words has decided to stay virtual for security reasons, according to their press release.

The Festival is celebrating another year with three incredible artists and two days of memorable events, they say.

The Word Festival is scheduled for Friday and Saturday November 5 and 6.

This year the festival will feature Grammy Award winner Louis Michot, poet, visual artists Malaika Favorite and Mississippi poet laureate Aimee Nezhukumatathil. Festival events include creative writing workshops for students and the community, an open mic community stage and ‘Drive-by Poetry’ in which young people give dramatic presentations of the writings of the festival’s authors.

Program of the event:

For programming, the Friday evening event includes a poetic and musical presentation of the three featured artists. On Saturday, the Drive-by Poetry artists from the Magnet Academy of Cultural Arts will recite works by featured authors. There will also be an open mic on the community stage and multiple creative writing workshops, open to the public.

Artists for the event:

Favorite Malaika, born the second of nine children to Amos and Rosemary Favorite, is an artist and poet from Geismar, Louisiana. As an eleventh-grade student in 1965, Favorite was the first African American to enter Ascension Parish Schools when she transferred from Separate Prairieville High School to Dutchtown High School. Favorite received his BFA and MFA from Louisiana State University.

Favorite’s work resides in the permanent collections of the Morris Museum of Southern Art, Absolut Vodka, The Coca-Cola Company, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta Airport, and others. She is an artist member of the Baton Rouge Gallery and has exhibited her work in many institutions. She has published two collections of poetry, Dreaming at the Manor and Illuminated manuscript: poems and prints.

Louis Michot is best known as the violinist and singer of the Grammy Award-winning Lost Bayou Ramblers, but his passion for French and local Louisiana folklore is what fuels his career as a musician. Based in Arnaudville, LA, Louis resides with his wife Ashlee and his three sons, Julien, Louis Jr and Marius in the house he built himself.

Louis was born and raised in southern Louisiana and began playing Cajun music on the double bass at the age of 14, replacing Uncle David Michot in his father and uncles travel group. , The Michot Brothers. He took up the violin at age 19 and started the Lost Bayou Ramblers with his brother Andre Michot. Louis began learning his ancestral language, French, by traveling through French Canada, learning Cajun Francophones at his home in southern Louisiana, and singing the endless repertoire of French Cajun music.

Aimée Nezhukumatathil is the author of a book of essays on nature, World of Wonders: In Praise of Fireflies, Whale Sharks, and More, which was named a finalist for the Kirkus Prize in Non-Fiction, and four award-winning collections of poetry, most recent, Oceanic (2018). Awards for his writing include scholarships from the Mississippi Arts Council, the Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters Award for Poetry, the National Endowment of the Arts, and the Guggenheim Foundation. His writing has appeared in NYTimes Magazine, ESPN and Best American Poetry. She is a professor of English and Creative Writing in the Master of Fine Arts program at the University of Mississippi.

Word festival

2021

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5

Event: Zoom Public reading and questions and answers

Artists: Malaika Favorite, Louis Michot and Aimée Nezhukumatathil

Time: 6.30 p.m. – 9.00 p.m.

Site: Zoom link on festivalofwords.org [festivalofwords.org]

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 6

Event: “Poetry at the wheel”

Presenters: Magnet Academy of Cultural Arts students perform works by Malaika Favorite, Louis Michot and Aimee Nezhukumatathil

Time: 10 am-1pm

Site: Zoom link on festivalofwords.org [festivalofwords.org]

Event: Prize-giving ceremony for the youth literary creation competition

Time: 11h00 to 12h30

Site: Zoom link on festivalofwords.org [festivalofwords.org]

Event: Community stage Open Mic + Poetry Slam

Time: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Site: Zoom link on festivalofwords.org [festivalofwords.org]

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 6

WORKSHOPS

Event: Poetic writing workshop with Aimée Nezhukumatathil

Time: 9:30 am-11:20 am

Site: Zoom link on festivalofwords.org [festivalofwords.org]

Event: Songwriting workshop with Lois Michot

Time: 1:00 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.

Site: Zoom link on festivalofwords.org [festivalofwords.org]

Event: The What If Fiction Writing Workshop with Favorite Malaika

Time: 3:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.

Site: Zoom link on festivalofwords.org [festivalofwords.org]

SUBSCRIBE to WORKSHOPS https://festivalofwords.org/workshops.php [festivalofwords.org]

The Festival of Words is supported in part by a grant from the Louisiana Arts Division, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation, and Tourism, in cooperation with the State Arts Council of Louisiana, administered by the Acadiana Center for the Arts. Sponsors include the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, the Culture Cares Fund, the Atchafalaya National Heritage Zone, and the St. Landry Parish Tourism Commission.

The Festival of Words says they appreciate their partnerships with Acadiana Open Channel, Acadiana Writing Project, Alexander Books, Lyrically Inclined, Nunu’s, St. Landry Parish Schools and many volunteers and sponsors.

More details to come. For more information, see festivalofwords.org [festivalofwords.org] or contact Martha Garner at (337) 804-2482 or fowmartha@gmail.com.

————————————————– ———-
Keep in touch with us anytime, anywhere.

To join the newsroom or report a typo / correction, click HERE.

Sign up for newsletters sent by email to your inbox. Choose from these options: Latest News, Evening News Headlines, Latest COVID-19 Headlines, Morning News Headlines, Special Offers

Follow us on twitter

Like us on facebook

Follow us on Instagram

Subscribe to our Youtube channel



Source link

]]>
Young artists from the San Ramon Valley to present their work in “Impressions of Light” | New https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/young-artists-from-the-san-ramon-valley-to-present-their-work-in-impressions-of-light-new/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 18:00:26 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/young-artists-from-the-san-ramon-valley-to-present-their-work-in-impressions-of-light-new/ More than a century after the rise of the French Impressionists, local residents will receive a crash course in the legacy of this movement and its relevance today, at an upcoming art exhibition in Danville. The Village Theater and Art Gallery will host “Impressions of Light”, an exhibition designed to showcase the work of young […]]]>

More than a century after the rise of the French Impressionists, local residents will receive a crash course in the legacy of this movement and its relevance today, at an upcoming art exhibition in Danville.

The Village Theater and Art Gallery will host “Impressions of Light”, an exhibition designed to showcase the work of young artists who learned the history and techniques of Impressionism at colleges in the San Ramon Valley.

The exhibit will feature works by students from Charlotte Wood, Diablo Vista, Iron Horse, Los Cerros, Pine Valley, Stone Valley, and Windemere Ranch. Charlotte Wood’s teacher Gary Leveque and Pine Valley teacher Tricia Grame, both prolific artists themselves, curate and organize the exhibit.

“Initially, the artistic community didn’t know what to do with it,” said Leveque of the early French Impressionists. “No one has seen anything like it before, and you’re trying to get the concept across to the students.”

This is one of the many things that could resonate with the college’s art students, who prepared works for the exhibition under Leveque’s supervision. While the early teens can be a lonely and alienating time at the best of times, the pandemic – and the way kids can feel like no one knows what to do with them lately – has made education artistic all the more important, according to Lévèque.

“If there had ever been a time for art and expression, to hear the voice of students… They struggle in so many different ways, but in art they can not only be successful, they can feel empowered, ”said Leveque.

Leveque highlighted the way Impressionism made use of light and how Impressionist artists are known to track movement and play of light over time throughout the day, as being particularly important for students in the present moment, learning to express oneself as time. walking forward.

Grame agreed that learning to see light through the eyes of Impressionist artists was a critical experience for students.

“They’re going to look at the subject differently,” Grame said. “I tell them that when you learn the value of capturing light and shadow, you will never look at anything the same again… someone’s face, the way the highlights come in, it changes your visceral experience. , your vision, and all the dancing. You get the 3-D, you get the color, you get the movement.

Another element of teaching students to put themselves in influential artists’ shoes, according to Grame and Leveque, is to insist that they learn about the biographies and stories of these artists and how their perspectives have influenced their work.

“Every artist’s work is almost autobiographical; it’s the time, the story, it’s what they had to say,” Grame said.

For the young artists in her class, Grame said that nature is central to what they have to say at that time and in history, as well as the development of their own voices.

“I think they feel the beauty of nature,” Grame said. “I think they realize that they don’t need to paint something just because someone is going to think it’s the most important picture.”

Grame and Leveque both emphasized that their work in education goes both ways: they learn and be inspired by young artists in their class, in the same way they are by artists canonized throughout history.

“I don’t think you can stress enough that teachers who are open to learning – this is the best kind of teaching,” Leveque said.

Both teachers are working artists who have collaborated on exhibitions in the past and see their work at the heart of the message they want to convey to students. Additionally, both recognize how valuable having an audience and audience input can be for artists.

“Seeing the power of their artwork and how people react to it – it puts them in the public eye, and then it opens up to what it’s like to keep working with art, what it is that self-assess, how do you take public opinion… you have this wide range of reception, ”said Leveque.

Additionally, the two hope the exhibit will help raise awareness of the value of the arts in local schools, something that can be overlooked by students and parents who focus solely on academic success.

“We know that if you don’t put it on the public front, they won’t care about the arts,” Grame said.

This makes empowering young artists all the more important and satisfying, according to Leveque, in a way that might not be the same for teachers of all subjects.

“My students feel like they can make a difference in this world through their art, and what better than that,” said Leveque.

“Impressions of Light” will take place from November 6 to December 17 at the Village Theater in Danville, with an opening reception on November 6 from 4 pm to 6 pm. Refreshments will be served on the theater terrace, although no food or drink is allowed inside, and masks are mandatory. More information is available here.


Source link

]]>
Boom in sales of unlicensed cars in France due to the “Covid effect” https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/boom-in-sales-of-unlicensed-cars-in-france-due-to-the-covid-effect/ Wed, 27 Oct 2021 11:08:21 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/boom-in-sales-of-unlicensed-cars-in-france-due-to-the-covid-effect/ Sales of new cars without a license have climbed 73% in France this year, breaking all previous records, in a boom that has been partly attributed to the “Covid effect”. Car sales soared between January and September 2021, reaching a total of 16,044, from 9,626 during the same period in 2019, according to figures from […]]]>

Sales of new cars without a license have climbed 73% in France this year, breaking all previous records, in a boom that has been partly attributed to the “Covid effect”.

Car sales soared between January and September 2021, reaching a total of 16,044, from 9,626 during the same period in 2019, according to figures from data analysts AAA Data.

The cars have a maximum speed of 45 km / h and can be driven by people aged 14 and over without a full driver’s license.

Marie-Laure Nivot, head of market intelligence at AAA Data, said the boom could largely be attributed to what she called the “Covid effect”.

She told Le Figaro: “We are absolutely witnessing a very, very strong evolution in the mobility market. The health crisis has changed people’s behavior in terms of travel, and has increased the demand for individual vehicles.

As people seek to avoid public transportation, demand has increased for small cars, motorcycles, scooters, and used cars.

Ms Nivot explained: “We have broken all records when it comes to these small cars. Look, for example, at the arrival of the Citroën Ami electric model, very popular with young people and which is very successful in Paris.

Young drivers of change

The boom in sales seems to mark a change in the types of people using these vehicles, young people are particularly interested in them.

Small electric cars were once associated with the elderly or those whose licenses had been suspended.

“Fifteen years ago, it was seen more as a vehicle for the elderly in rural and remote areas,” said Alison Whitaker, marketing and communications manager at European license-free car leader Aixam.

“But that is changing. The need for autonomy and the lack of travel options for those who live in underserved areas are also factors that explain the success of the unlicensed car.

AAA data shows that cars – known as carts, car without a license (VSP) or even “yogurt pot” cars in French – are most successful in the departments of the North, followed by Paris, Bouches-du-Rhône and Var. .

Cars start at € 8,990 and cost an average of € 12,500.

As a result, it would appear that in many cases parents help their young adult children to purchase these vehicles, which are considered more “accessible”.

These vehicles only require an AM license (AM license), which can be obtained from a local driving school in just eight hours.

Additionally, cars are often considered safer for young people than other forms of electric transportation.

Mr Whittaker said: “For obvious reasons of safety and comfort, parents prefer to see their children in an unlicensed car than on a scooter.”

What are the rules for these unlicensed cars?

Related Articles

Cars without a driving license from 14 years old in France

Citroën’s license-free electric cars spread from Paris to Washington



Source link

]]>
MAP: Tracking COVID-19 Cases and Outbreaks in York Region Schools https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/map-tracking-covid-19-cases-and-outbreaks-in-york-region-schools/ Tue, 26 Oct 2021 03:23:29 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/map-tracking-covid-19-cases-and-outbreaks-in-york-region-schools/ ???????? This article is a daily follow-up of confirmed positive COVID-19 cases, closed classes and outbreaks in schools in York Region. The darker the color on the map below, the more positive cases among staff and students have been confirmed in local schools. Hover or click on your city or town to see the total […]]]>

????????

This article is a daily follow-up of confirmed positive COVID-19 cases, closed classes and outbreaks in schools in York Region.

The darker the color on the map below, the more positive cases among staff and students have been confirmed in local schools. Hover or click on your city or town to see the total number of school cases and other details.


Since October 25 at 5 p.m., there are 23 confirmed / probable cases among York Region District School Board staff and students and 14 York Catholic District School Board confirmed / probable cases.

There are 37 confirmed / probable cases among staff and students of private schools and 1 in francophone public and Catholic schools in York Region.

Of 37 cases in public and Catholic councils, 9 Where 24.3 percent are in high schools.

There are 4 schools with declared outbreaks of COVID-19 in Vaughan and Markham.

An outbreak is declared in schools with at least two laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 over a 14-day period, with at least one case that could have been contracted in the school.

Outbreaks in schools with positive COVID-19 tests:

• David Suzuki Public School, Markham – four students;

• Eitz Chaim School, Vaughan – three students and one staff member / visitor;

• Joe Dwek Ohr HuEmet Sephardic School, Vaughan – 16 students and three staff / visitors;

Netivot Hatorah Day School, Vaughan – 10 students.

Here is a full list of active COVID-19 cases in public and Catholic schools in York Region:

Important: A positive case in a school does not mean that the person was exposed to COVID-19 at the school. They may have been exposed elsewhere in the community.

The YRDSB and YCDSB have set up advisory boards that provide the number of confirmed positive COVID-19 cases active in connection with their schools.

YRDSB Advisory Board

YCDSB Advisory Board


Source link

]]>