Language school – Lycee Paul Claudel http://lycee-paul-claudel.com/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 06:51:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Language school – Lycee Paul Claudel http://lycee-paul-claudel.com/ 32 32 Danvers school committee faces tough questions after report questions response to high school hazing https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/danvers-school-committee-faces-tough-questions-after-report-questions-response-to-high-school-hazing/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 05:51:40 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/danvers-school-committee-faces-tough-questions-after-report-questions-response-to-high-school-hazing/ The Danvers school committee was caught in the eye of the storm of controversy at its monthly meeting Monday over the alleged hazing behavior of a high school hockey team, involving racial slurs and sexual abuse – and that the School and city officials had helped cover up the actions – after it was reported […]]]>

The Danvers school committee was caught in the eye of the storm of controversy at its monthly meeting Monday over the alleged hazing behavior of a high school hockey team, involving racial slurs and sexual abuse – and that the School and city officials had helped cover up the actions – after it was reported in the Boston Globe over the weekend.

An alleged victim of the hazing, who spoke on condition of anonymity, described to the Globe what has been called ‘Hard R Fridays’, where players from the 2019-20 Danvers High School squad were hit with a toy sexual in the face until they shouted the n-word, and “Gay Tuesdays,” where players were forced to undress and were then inappropriately touched. More than half of the team also reportedly participated in a group discussion where participants shared offensive images and language.

A sense of need for greater accountability hung over the meeting, with committee members and the public conversely calling for unity and change after the intricacies of its bureaucratic relationships were publicly exposed. .

The details of the article touched the hearts of the committee and the city on Monday.

“I do not believe that any appropriate action or disciplinary action was taken as a result of the independent investigation into the charge of racism and hazing within our high school hockey program,” said Alice Campbell, member. of the school committee, elected in May. “It is unacceptable that no adult has been held responsible. I believe that with the lack of real action, we have let down our students, teachers, parents, caregivers and community members. We have been told that these actions do not reflect the core values, mission and vision that we seek for our school system, yet the lack of transparency and action says otherwise.

One of the key questions at play during the meeting was what officials knew about the alleged misconduct and when, as well as how the negligence – if any – should be handled.

Danvers school committee secretary Arthur Skarmeas called Globe reports suggesting that school officials had deliberately swept the issue under the carpet as a “pile of crap”. City officials wrote two reports and commissioned a third, according to The Globe, after learning of the problem in June 2020.

“This and the pandemic have been the main focus of what we’ve been doing here for the past year and a half,” Skarmeas said.

He and other members of the committee stressed that they have been limited in what they can publicly disclose due to student privacy laws.

School committee member Robin Doherty, also elected in May, called for a vote to put District Superintendent Lisa Dana on administrative leave while the committee considers its upcoming decisions. Doherty’s motion was eventually tabled for a later session.

Baldassare, Danvers’ coach and police sergeant at the time, denied investigators any knowledge of the alleged hazing, according to The Globe. He resigned over the summer.

But, whatever the reaction to the Globe article, it was clear that it had created a feeling that change was needed.

Danvers High principal Adam Federico, who took over as head of the school over the summer, told the meeting that the article reinforces that work to improve the school community must continue.

“Today, I spoke to all students and faculty not only to salute the Boston Globe article, but to ask everyone to come together at our school to continue working to make it a better place.” , did he declare. “Tonight I ask for the help and support of the entire Danvers community.”

Federico said all athletes have received anti-bias training and the goal is to extend this training to the entire student body.

Gabe Lopes, who has lived in Danvers for about five years, said the students deserve a fresh start and called for a change in the leadership of the school board.

“Some of you, especially here, please step back and let the city heal and start over,” he said.

However, how deep the apparent problem goes and the level of response needed remains to be debated.

“There’s a disagreement, some people say, ‘Oh, it’s just a few people in this town, racism, homophobia, not really a problem, just a few bad apples.’ Other people think it’s pretty systemic and have talked about it, ”school committee chair Eric Crane said. “And the point is, I think it’s something that as a city – not just the schools – but with the citizens of the city, the central government, we have to consider: are we really the welcoming city? that we want to be? Are we teaching our students how to act appropriately and what they should do and accept others? “


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Our ten-year vision to increase and improve planning for the provision of Welsh education in our region https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/our-ten-year-vision-to-increase-and-improve-planning-for-the-provision-of-welsh-education-in-our-region/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 16:25:09 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/our-ten-year-vision-to-increase-and-improve-planning-for-the-provision-of-welsh-education-in-our-region/ Neath Port Talbot Local Authority Borough Council recognizes that language and culture are essential parts of an individual’s identity and is committed to promoting and ensuring meaningful access to language learning. Welsh for pupils of all phases and sectors. Our vision to improve planning and thereby increase the provision of Welsh education at Neath Port […]]]>

Neath Port Talbot Local Authority Borough Council recognizes that language and culture are essential parts of an individual’s identity and is committed to promoting and ensuring meaningful access to language learning. Welsh for pupils of all phases and sectors.

Our vision to improve planning and thereby increase the provision of Welsh education at Neath Port Talbot will facilitate the national vision for the Welsh language, to secure 1 million Welsh speakers by 2050. We share the vision from the Welsh government:

… to ensure favorable conditions across the country that support language acquisition and the use of Welsh skills. We want to see an increase in the transmission of the language in the family, an early introduction of Welsh to every child, an education system that offers Welsh skills to all

Cymraeg 2050 – One Million Welsh Speakers (Welsh Government, 2017)

At Neath Port Talbot, we will empower all learners, families and caregivers to develop their Welsh skills and use the language confidently in everyday life. Welsh education is an integral and essential part of the learning offer at Neath Port Talbot. We believe that all children should benefit from the opportunity to learn, enjoy and shape their lives through Welsh. The authority underpins this principle by committing to allow all learners to benefit from its universal access to this offer.

Our Welsh in Education Strategic Plan (WESP) 2022-2032 will be the cornerstone of this vision and will detail how we plan to support and further develop the teaching of Welsh in schools and communities at large and how we plan our future growth. The plan details how we will ensure further development over the next 10 years, from January 2022 to January 2032. It aligns with:

  • Well-Being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015
  • “A Wales of vibrant culture and a thriving Welsh language”
  • Prosperity for All: The National Strategy and Agenda for Government, Moving Wales Forward 2016-2021
  • The Welsh Government’s National Welsh Language Strategy “Cymraeg 2050: One million Welsh speakers by 2050”
  • Education in Wales: our national mission, action plan 2017-21-
    A desire for learners to become increasingly bilingual and commitments to encourage teachers with some ability to speak Welsh to further develop their skills
  • Welsh in education, action plan 2017-21
    Sets the direction for the development of Welsh education
  • Neath Port Talbot Welsh Language Promotion Strategy

Our compulsory education system has a key role to play in increasing the number of Welsh speakers and, as the Welsh Government’s Cymraeg 2050 strategy points out, “providers of post-compulsory education and training have a role to play in increasing the number of Welsh speakers. key to playing in maintaining learners’ Welsh skills to meet the growing need for a bilingual workforce ”. In order to achieve our goals, we need to significantly increase the number of pupils who have the opportunity to develop Welsh skills in all contexts and thus use it in their daily lives.

The Welsh government has set a target for Neath Port Talbot to increase the number of learners accessing Welsh education between 17% and 27% over a 10-year period. This target is based on increasing the number of first graders taught in Welsh from 16.8% (252 students) in 2020/21 (PLASC 2021) to 31% (460 students) by 2032. Our plan ambitious is to exceed the upper end of the target set by the Welsh government.

Current trends and projected forecasts.

The overall 10-year target is set following a geographic and demographic assessment. The analysis tells us:

  • The number of children in the age zero cohort gradually increased in the early 2000s, but this process has now stabilized and returned to lower levels previously seen at the start of the period.
  • The three-year average number of individuals in this cohort in 2017-2019 is 1,436, which represents a decrease of 5.9% from the level observed a decade earlier, while the three-year average for 2007-2009 was 1,526 (90 more individuals per year).
  • The five-year age cohort has shown significant growth over the past decade, with the three-year average being 15.2% higher for this age group in 2017-2019 than in 2007-2009 ( from 1390 to 1601). This contrasts with the older cohorts, as the number of 15-year-olds in the county borough has seen a steady decline over the past 15 years, with the number of this age group now 17.7% lower. than a decade earlier.

County level population graph

The above data shows a decrease in the zero-age population, however, an analysis of factors that will impact the future of Welsh education has shown an expected leveling off of the school-age population and a potential for a substantial increase in the number of Welsh learners within the next 10 years. Factors taken into consideration during the assessment included population changes, population density, population composition, existing Welsh skills, current Welsh learners and the potential additional demand for education in Welsh. Welsh.

The assessment data shows that some areas within the local authority show significant population growth in the under 19 category, one showing a population increase of 76.6% from a three-year average from 475 in 2002-04 to 839 in 2017-19. The three-year average for this area of ​​839 makes it the largest in terms of absolute population for this age group.

Population under 19 Average 2017-19

Less than 19% Population change 2002-4 average to 2017-19 average

Analysis of the data shows that the strategic plan will require a proactive and reactive approach to include:

  • create new Welsh language schools in areas where demand for Welsh language education is identified
  • create demand for Welsh education in new geographies

Achieve the vision

In order to deliver the WESP, our main objectives are:

  • present a proposal to create 3 more Welsh-language primary schools as part of the 10-year plan
  • increase transfer rates between pre-school and Welsh language education by 80% over the life of the plan: we will implement an action plan in collaboration with providers such as Mudiad Meithrin
  • ensure increased transition rates from Welsh-language primary schools to Welsh-language secondary schools with the aim of ensuring a transition rate of 100% per year
  • establish subsequent entry point language support for pupils wishing to enter Welsh middle education through an immersion program for latecomers for primary and secondary learners, as indicated in outcome 2
  • ensure that the teaching of the Welsh language in all Welsh and English speaking settings provides students with the skills and ability to become confident and sustained speakers of Welsh
  • ensure that post 16 education through Welsh is strengthened and thus meets the needs and aspirations of all students
  • maintain the availability of transport in accordance with the travel policy approved by the council to promote access to the Welsh language offer
  • ensure that children and young people with ALN are provided with equal language opportunities in terms of education and support in Welsh in line with the obligations imposed by the Additional Learning Needs Act 2018 and the court of education (Wales)
  • ensure that access, at local or regional level, to vocational training to support the development of effective Welsh teaching and learning that meets the identified needs of those working in both the English sectors and Welsh
  • recognize Welsh as an essential part of role specifications when recruiting all school staff; we will clearly define our expectations in terms of skill level requirement (from level 0 to 3) and provide internal training to support staff development
  • to ensure that the WESP Forum has clear objectives to enable it to deliver results effectively

These main objectives are discussed in detail in the following pages, along with a brief summary of the current situation and our proposals for the duration of the WESP.


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Flagler Schools Remove “Fairness” from Goals Under Pressure https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/flagler-schools-remove-fairness-from-goals-under-pressure/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 20:06:12 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/flagler-schools-remove-fairness-from-goals-under-pressure/ In a move that left one school board member stunned and others embracing a change that seemed almost entirely the result of vague and controversial attacks on the word on social media and busy but limited national discussions, the school board of the Flagler County agreed on Tuesday to remove the word “fairness” from its […]]]>

In a move that left one school board member stunned and others embracing a change that seemed almost entirely the result of vague and controversial attacks on the word on social media and busy but limited national discussions, the school board of the Flagler County agreed on Tuesday to remove the word “fairness” from its goals.

The word will be replaced by “student success”.

“I can’t even believe we’re having this conversation. I really can’t believe we’re having this conversation, ”said Board Member Colleen Conklin. “All the work that this district has done, all that has taken place over the years and the conversations that we have had with community members and stakeholders, we are now going to remove a key term from our strategic plan because that we have a political group that is not happy with the use of the term equity. I think this conversation is absolutely ridiculous.

The school board did not precisely define “fairness” and did not feel the need to do so, year after year, when it would regularly hear its administration present equity report after equity report, such as requires it by law (as it did for example on July 20). But Superintendent Cathy Mittelstadt defined it Tuesday as “how our intention is to be deliberate with our resources to ensure that every student has the opportunity to succeed.” The National School Board Association defines it as: “Educational equity is the intentional allocation of resources, instruction and opportunity based on need, requiring that discriminatory practices, prejudices and beliefs be identified and eradicated.

The school board and administration have been working for months on their “strategic plan,” a blueprint for general goals and principles that define how the district operates and for what purpose. The completed document has not yet been made public, not even to board members. But his project in broad outline has. It includes – or includes – six goals: academics, equity, social and emotional well-being, talent, improved operational efficiency and communications.

None of the goals were controversial. For example, for academics, the goal is “to increase student achievement in reading and math, as identified by the state and
progress monitoring evaluations.

Equity: “Increase equitable access for all students to a high quality educational experience” by ensuring that all students have access to crash courses, “with a focus on students who are traditionally under-represented », Implementing K-12 to career pathways in each school, a daily focus on students with disabilities and the implementation of what is called, in the ever-present jargon of educational bureaucracies, a “multi-level support system”. This means, again, that all students must have “equitable access to high quality education and interventions to meet all student needs”, according to one definition.

As recently as August, Mittelstadt told the board – without objections – how “the term fairness is of crucial importance to all of us. We want to make sure that all of our nine brick-and-mortar schools, whatever, by the end of December, whenever it pleases the board to adopt the new rezoning policy – families, wherever. they reside, will get a quality education that is going to be a similar experience, whether you are in one of our five primary schools or both middle and two high schools. So we are very invested in this whole process. And part of that, I think, is one of the buckets that comes up when we talk about our strategic plan process.

Goals are restatements of basic strategies that most school boards have been implementing in one way or another for years, polishing the language and details here and there while keeping the principles recognizable. Talent is focused on recruiting top quality staff. “Operational efficiencies” go into the details of work order fulfillment rates and attendance rates at school meals and other issues that attract little or no public interest. The strategic plan is not even entirely the product of Flagler Schools, but a spin-off of a company, DeliverEd, which helps districts adjust their goals accordingly.

Mittlestadt herself wasn’t necessarily proposing a word change, although she leaned that way after sending an email to board members suggesting ‘student success’ as a replacement. She was asking the school board for direction on Tuesday in light of recent public comments – and comments from board members themselves – on the word “fairness.” A few weeks ago, some parents raised the word critically in the context of a previously proposed rezoning plan, falsely accusing the board of letting “fairness” guide its rezoning approach. The word, never controversial until recently, has taken on an ideological tinge with the backlash against “critical race theory,” anti-racism efforts in schools, and pro-LGBTQ policies and procedures.

“It doesn’t change where we need to go by changing the title,” Mittelstadt said, “but the intention of the district staff and the reason we use the word equity was because we think Flagler schools have some under “Groups within our demographics where our gaps just haven’t closed. And we wanted to be so intentional about how we’ve moved our work forward. And that’s why the team came up with this particular title for this goal.”

Terms like “fairness” and “critical race theory” are usually thrown around willy-nilly with little understanding of what they mean. But they developed powerful coded meanings, translating into effective rhetorical tools, rallying and energizing various subsets of the GOP base in the later campaigns of the Culture Wars: Glenn Youngkin, who won the governorship in Virginia on Tuesday. , had campaigned against critical race theory. and for “parental rights” up to and including their right to prevent their children from being awarded race-sensitive books such as “Beloved,” by Nobel Prize-winning author Toni Morrison.

“I think it’s become such an inflammatory word among the population,” said Janet McDonald, board member, “that I think student success, which is our goal, can get us there and be there. more uniformly recognized by people that this is really what our strategic plan is all about. Because the other is simply drawing attention to something that it is not. (The renamed goal would be “student support” rather than student achievement.) Board member Jill Woolbright said the same. “I don’t think anyone would have a problem with student support. However, there are some, I don’t think anyone would have problems with with student support. have heard from many, who have a fairness issue, and whether it’s a misunderstanding or what we mean or not, it’s still their beef, and if we can get the same thing accomplished with one word more acceptable, I see no reason not to change. Woolbright, like McDonald’s, does often referring to the “many” in the community to support his positions, but without indicating who the “many” are or how much they represent.

“Fairness is such a misinterpreted phrase that it is whatever people want it to correspond to,” said Cheryl Massaro, board member. “No matter how we’ve tried to explain it, it’s always going to fit whatever they want it to fit. So I think probably a change of language will make life a lot easier and more understandable for our families, and that’s the goal, so I support this change.

Conklin, acknowledging that she was in the minority, called it a “parody” if the term was changed. Board chairman Trevor Tucker said he didn’t care anyway, but said it was also questionable as he already sees a three-member majority to change.

The council’s decision is actually the culmination of a limited but heated local debate that dates back to the council’s adoption last year of fairness-based procedures regarding LGBTQ students. Randall Bertrand, the parent of a transgender student, applauded the advice at the time, but said words that anticipated this latest development: “People are going to come to you and they are going to want to tell you stories about a boogey man. , ensuring fairness for our LGBTQ students will suddenly make our schools unsafe, ”he told council at a meeting in April 2021.“ I learned a long time ago that if someone tells me about boogey man, I must carefully consider his motives. Words have meaning. Not just what we say. But we don’t say. I have read the fairness support procedures. While he doesn’t read exactly what I would like him to say, he strikes the right balance between protecting children by considering existing federal and state laws. “

On October 19, another speaker who has become a frequent presence at school board meetings – Chanel Channing – told the board that “fairness is what could lead to this collectivism, which then goes to socialism and communism, and so on. This is why I think you are going to find such a step back on fairness. She later shared her concerns about “the link between transgender people and equity”. Another speaker, Jessico Bowman, described fairness as a “CRT pentacle”.

As absurdly false as the statements are, they were part of the development that led to the board’s decision on Tuesday.


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Brevard Public Schools Launches “Thrive by Five” Initiative to Provide Books to Babies https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/brevard-public-schools-launches-thrive-by-five-initiative-to-provide-books-to-babies/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 16:06:27 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/brevard-public-schools-launches-thrive-by-five-initiative-to-provide-books-to-babies/ BREVARD COUNTY, Florida – Brevard Public Schools is partnering with local hospitals to provide all babies born in the county with their first picture books as part of an initiative to increase early childhood learning. Brevard Public Schools spokesperson Russell Bruhn said the project, titled “Thrive by Five,” had been in the works for about […]]]>

BREVARD COUNTY, Florida – Brevard Public Schools is partnering with local hospitals to provide all babies born in the county with their first picture books as part of an initiative to increase early childhood learning.

Brevard Public Schools spokesperson Russell Bruhn said the project, titled “Thrive by Five,” had been in the works for about four years, according to News 6 Florida Today partners.

Parents of babies born in Brevard will receive bags containing a copy of “The Brown Bear, the Brown Bear, What Do You See”, a bib, and a handout on how to maximize early childhood learning with a QR code that can take new parents to the district’s Thrive by Five website. The website has links to other free resources on childhood development, how babies learn, and how to keep young children on track to start reading.

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“For several years now, I have been looking for a way to ensure that our youngest learners, even from birth, are on the path to success even before entering our schools, because we know that if we can bring every toddler to be ready to read in kindergarten, their luck, their opportunity, their trajectory of academic success is soaring, ”BPS Superintendent Mark Mullins said at a press conference Monday for the initiative.

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Mullins said at a school board meeting last Tuesday that the resources will help families take advantage of a critical learning period in children’s lives and prepare them for school. Between birth and age 5, children develop 85% of their brains, including critical neural pathways related to language and communication

“If you’ve raised a kid, you know those early years, they change quickly, they learn quickly,” Mullins said. “In fact, they develop over a million neural connections per second… their brains are hardwired from birth to prepare to learn for the rest of their lives and their neurons are only firing at an accelerated rate.”

As of Monday, the website has been online and billboards have been promoting the initiative. Almost 1,500 bags have been packed so far, but BPS will need to pack more to support the 5,000 or so babies born in Brevard each year.

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Members of local hospitals, school district staff, chambers of commerce and school board members Katye Campbell and Cheryl McDougall gathered on Monday morning to wrap around 400 bags.

Children will get more books at 1, 2 and 3, Mullins said.

Mullins remarked at a school board meeting last Tuesday that when district staff contacted local hospital groups Health First, Steward Health Care and Parrish Medical Center, “it was the absolute fastest yes I got. have heard “.

“I phoned each of the CEOs in the organization and I said, ‘You know, we have this crazy idea of ​​connecting with all of the families who have kids in our community every day throughout the whole year. ‘year, “says Mullins. “’The problem is, I don’t know who they are, but you know because they go through your birth centers. Would you allow us to provide you with these kits or bags of family resources? And immediately it was the fastest absolute yes I have ever received from a business partner in the community.

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Hospital groups also contribute to the financing of the initiative.

“Regular reading to young children stimulates optimal patterns of brain development and strengthens parent-child relationships at a critical time in child development, which in turn strengthens the language, literacy, and social and emotional skills that last a lifetime, ”Timothy Laird, chief medical officer for Health First Medical Group, said. “Once again, we are privileged and honored to partner with our public schools in this important Thrive by Five initiative. “

The district is also working on developing an app to accompany the initiative, although Bruhn said it was not yet clear when the app would be ready.


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Miller South School of the Arts in Akron eases hearing requirements https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/miller-south-school-of-the-arts-in-akron-eases-hearing-requirements/ Mon, 01 Nov 2021 10:10:30 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/miller-south-school-of-the-arts-in-akron-eases-hearing-requirements/ If everyone is a stage, then every assignment at Miller South School for the Visual and Performing Arts is an art project. Reading assignments become dioramas with handmade clay or even aluminum foil artifacts that were important to the main characters. A lesson in blood cell science comes to life with needle felting, a manufacturing […]]]>

If everyone is a stage, then every assignment at Miller South School for the Visual and Performing Arts is an art project.

Reading assignments become dioramas with handmade clay or even aluminum foil artifacts that were important to the main characters. A lesson in blood cell science comes to life with needle felting, a manufacturing process that turns wool into a 3D object.

Although Miller has a strong focus on the arts, that doesn’t mean he’s giving up on any of the traditional college classes. But the arts become a part of every classroom, providing a unique project-based learning environment that helps make learning relevant to students.

Miller South has been operating in Akron Public Schools as a performing arts and visual arts focused school since 1993, serving students with artistic talents who had already been nurtured prior to their enrollment in the school.

For next year’s fourth graders, that’s about to change.

Art teacher Alison Rich teaches 12-year-old Josie Sisler, a seventh-year student, a painting technique at the Miller South School for Visual and Performing Arts in Akron.

In an effort to make school programming more accessible to students whose families may not have the resources for dance or piano lessons, Miller South is changing its hearing requirements for new students from fourth year, his youngest students.

Instead of a traditional audition or visual artwork submission, those who wish to enroll in school for the fourth grade will instead need to attend a two-hour workshop at the school, where teachers Walk them through four areas of interest for 30 minutes each and assess whether they have a talent or obvious enthusiasm coupled with a determination to improve. Students will also need two letters of recommendation.


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Students learn a second language during the COVID-19 pandemic. How they rise above the challenge https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/students-learn-a-second-language-during-the-covid-19-pandemic-how-they-rise-above-the-challenge/ Sun, 31 Oct 2021 04:20:07 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/students-learn-a-second-language-during-the-covid-19-pandemic-how-they-rise-above-the-challenge/ BLUFFDALE, Utah (ABC4 News) – The COVID-19 pandemic has posed unprecedented language and literacy challenges. But students participating in a dual language immersion (DLI) program rise to the challenge. During half of their school day, students at Summit Academy – Bluffdale learn to speak German. Penelope, a first grader, counted to 10 for ABC4 News. […]]]>

BLUFFDALE, Utah (ABC4 News) – The COVID-19 pandemic has posed unprecedented language and literacy challenges. But students participating in a dual language immersion (DLI) program rise to the challenge.

During half of their school day, students at Summit Academy – Bluffdale learn to speak German.

Penelope, a first grader, counted to 10 for ABC4 News.

“Eins, Zwei, Drei, Vier, Fünf, Sechs, Sieben, Acht, Neun, Zehn,” she said.

Teacher Christina Pehrson said students who learn another language benefit beyond just learning it.

“There are so many cognitive benefits from these kids and their brains are big enough because they’re kids, to do double duty, both learning the content and absorbing another language at the same time,” she said. declared. “It doesn’t help them, they just come out with the same abilities, just that they can speak another language as well.”

In the United States, around 1.4 million people speak German, according to babble.com. And the site reports that German is one of the most commonly used languages ​​in business because it is so widely spoken in Europe.

“The German language is the second most used language in science. Germany is the country of thinkers and philosophers and many inventors and I think the culture is also very unique, ”said teacher Milana Boss.

“The fact that there are now two ways of saying things, it opens your eyes or the mind to the fact that there are many ways of doing things and this kind of experience, I think, is what that we need, ”said Pehrson.

Sometimes learning a second language has proven difficult for students during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I couldn’t see all of their faces and how they were doing it and stuff and secondly, I can’t hear them well,” said fifth grader Paige Langford said.

“With the masks and the next part of the year they were with us, it was interesting to see how it impacted their pronunciation and hearing,” said teacher Laura Ebeling.

“The masks made it a little harder to speak, so that was really the only problem I had other than social distancing and everything,” said seventh-grader Griffin Merrill.

All German teachers interviewed by ABC4 News said they were proud of their students for overcoming the challenges of the pandemic.

“It was a challenge, but I was excited to see how we could take advantage of technology and give students the ability to register and communicate with each other, even virtually and in virtual environments,” Ebeling said.I think it’s amazing that you can focus a little more on the pronunciation and make sure that these clarifying factors are addressed really directly.

“They take on the challenges they face, whether it is not understanding the language, but they still have to do math, whether it is expressing themselves even in an emotional moment, trying to understand it. ‘express in a foreign language,’ said Pehrson. “They learn these skills all the way through and so they come out as very resilient kids and resilient students.”

Next summer, the seventh and eighth graders will travel to Germany to try their hand at the language.

“They can practice the language they learned in the classroom and have a real experience there and see what we are talking about and learning,” Boss said. “We hope that they will be interested in continuing to learn German after their return and that they see the benefit of being able to understand and talk to the locals.”

Students fundraise for the trip, to make sure every student can go. The boss said donations can be made by calling Summit Academy – Bluffdale at 801-254-9488.


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Korean cinema goes global | Duc today https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/korean-cinema-goes-global-duc-today/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 18:34:41 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/korean-cinema-goes-global-duc-today/ That Squid Game may have become an international success may even have surprised Netflix executives, but the international reach of Korean culture has long been increasing. However, the “Squid Game” gorefest is another popular example of a particular genre of Korean movies and TV shows, a genre that includes Bong Joon-ho’s “Parasite” and “Snowpiercer”, and […]]]>

That Squid Game may have become an international success may even have surprised Netflix executives, but the international reach of Korean culture has long been increasing.

However, the “Squid Game” gorefest is another popular example of a particular genre of Korean movies and TV shows, a genre that includes Bong Joon-ho’s “Parasite” and “Snowpiercer”, and even the movie. of “Train to Busan” zombies. “Like ‘Squid Game’, the terror of the action in these shows is offset by the trauma created by a society built on extreme class divisions and the punishment imposed on people who lose out in the system. offer economic critiques, the Korean contributions seem particularly to attract the world’s imagination.

Professor Duke Nayoung Aimee Kwon is an Associate Professor in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies and an expert in Korean culture, politics and history. She said the inequality issues raised in “Squid Game” were part of a long theme in Korean culture dating back hundreds of years. Below, Kwon discusses the history of political criticism in Korean art and the social and cultural nuances that American viewers may miss watching a giant children’s toy slaughter hundreds of people.

Q: What are American audiences most likely to miss when they watch “Squid Game? “

NAYOUNG AIMEE KWON: South Korean directors don’t always pamper global audiences and translate everything. There are many Easter eggs that the public may not be aware of. The gigantic doll in the game “Green Light Red Light”, is actually a ubiquitous image of a girl character that appears in textbook lessons. Her name is Younghi and her boyish counterpart is Chulsoo, common names like “Jack and Jill” from nursery rhymes here. This beloved and familiar character from childhood nostalgia is reincarnated as a spooky doll of gigantic proportions who leads a deadly schoolyard game while shooting balls with crazy eyes. It’s loaded.

Many Americans may not have understood the implications of the corrupt and privileged American figures who organize and bet on the games while the poor are pitted against each other and forced to fight to the end. There is a symbolism of the uneven dynamics underway between South Korea and the United States that dates back to when the United States divided the Koreas in less than 30 minutes using a crude National Geographic map. and installed their army in the South, in effect creating the dividing system of two of the polar opposition regimes still at war half a century later.

Q: Some characters in Squid Games are not South Korean. What does their presence on the social dynamics in South Korea show?

KWON: Since the 1990s, South Korea has undergone enormous demographic transformations. One of the factors has been the Asian financial crisis and the increased urban concentration of population and resources, especially around the capital Seoul. These and other factors have created a need in some manufacturing and agricultural sectors and attracted low-wage workers from regions such as China, Southeast Asia and Africa.

North Korean refugees and the Korean ethnic diaspora from China as well as the former Soviet Union have also been expelled by various political and socio-economic challenges in these regions, which has created additional push factors for these regions to South Korea. In addition, the growing popularity of Korean popular culture and the success of the tourism industry continue to attract people to Korea in recent decades in other sectors like the entertainment industry. “Squid Game” showed some of the diverse aspects of contemporary South Korea, including an actor from Pakistan who became a local celebrity playing the roles of migrant workers.

Q: What is happening in Korean art that increases its international visibility and why does inequality play such an important role?

KWON: It is perhaps natural that a society that has struggled with extreme inequalities throughout its long history stretching back thousands of years has developed compelling storytelling practices in this direction. Before the modern era, there was a sovereign monarchical and aristocratic order. There was a strict stillness between the different social strata. Artists tended to come either from higher scholars or from lower status groups. Some of the latter’s most iconic artists are kisaeng, or female artists, and p’ansori artists who often came from low-born groups like the shamans and whose art embodied their struggles. They could illicitly interact with the upper classes and even influence their art, but these relationships were not legitimized by society.

In the modern era, Korea was colonized by Japan and then underwent military occupation by the United States, the division of the country that spanned over half a century with a still ongoing war between the North and the South. With perceived and real external threats, internal inequalities are exacerbated. For example, the gender inequalities that exist in most societies tend to be over-exaggerated in a militarized society like Korea. Most able-bodied college-aged boys whose families cannot afford to buy them out of service. enlisted in the military during the early years of college. The patriarchal inequality underlying this military culture of hierarchies permeates corporate culture, education and other arenas. In the 1980s, the rise of socially engaged minjung art, or folk art, became influential in various artistic practices, including the New Wave of Filmmakers. These new artists began to more openly question the unequal geopolitical condition of the Koreas under the influence of the superpowers, especially the outsized impact of the United States which has always presented itself as a savior until then.

When you have such a long history of artistic traditions of socially engaged artists who creatively oppose social inequalities, you tend to be good at it. Again, I think this long story converges with new technological and distribution developments now coming together in exciting new ways.

Q: What explains the growing US interest in Korean culture at the moment?

Movie poster
KWON: The world has been increasingly fascinated by Korean culture over the past two decades. It took a little longer for this to fully manifest itself in the United States. I think this delay has something to do with the sheer strength and historical monolingualism of the mammoths of the popular cultural industry like Hollywood that make it extremely difficult for newbies and especially non-English speakers. linguistic content to penetrate. Bong Joon-ho’s comment on the one-inch caption barrier in his Oscar speech was incisive.

Another interesting convergence is that there has been a huge demand for Korean culture and language courses in schools and universities. The Modern Language Association has shown that Korean is one of the few languages ​​that has seen a dramatic increase in enrollment at American universities over the past decade.

Duke tried to make himself known in the field of Asian studies. It currently has a campus in China, two masters programs in East Asian Studies, a Korean language program which has doubled enrollment in the past 5-6 years. I hope we can look to the development of Duke’s Korean Studies program to meet these increasing demands for a more comprehensive Asian Studies program from our students and the community. UNC-Chapel Hill has invested in this area in recent years. Building on the strength of what already exists, there is a tremendous opportunity to jointly build these programs in new, innovative directions in the South.


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4 budget-friendly digital gifts that don’t need to be shipped https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/4-budget-friendly-digital-gifts-that-dont-need-to-be-shipped/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 12:01:13 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/4-budget-friendly-digital-gifts-that-dont-need-to-be-shipped/ boggy22 / Getty Images / iStockphoto Purchases don’t necessarily have to include shipping – and that’s a blessing in 2021. Inflation has pushed up the cost of just about everything for most of the year, and much of it is due the increasing cost of getting things from here to there. Thanks to clogged ports, […]]]>

boggy22 / Getty Images / iStockphoto

Purchases don’t necessarily have to include shipping – and that’s a blessing in 2021. Inflation has pushed up the cost of just about everything for most of the year, and much of it is due the increasing cost of getting things from here to there. Thanks to clogged ports, a labor shortage, skyrocketing fuel prices and a global supply chain crisis, shipping packages is costing much more now than it was at the same time. last year – and the high-pressure holiday season isn’t even here yet.

Good to know: The Ultimate Guide to Holiday Etiquette Gifts
Discover: Your Complete Guide to Getting Going and Saving on Holiday Shopping

The good news is, you don’t have to participate.

An Internet connection is all you need to deliver a world-class gift that will be as well received as anything that would have happened on a truck. There is a digital gift to suit every budget and taste, but you might be running out of ideas. This is where GOBankingRates comes in.

Looking for a great digital gift that gets you on the go with UPS, FedEx, and USPS? Here are some ideas to get you started.

To be aware: How much should you spend on gifts for acquaintances?

Online music or art lessons

One thing that should never be boxed, stuffed with bubble wrap, and placed in the back of a truck for delivery is personal enrichment – and what better gift to give? For the music lovers in your life, sites like School of Rock offer private lessons in guitar, bass, vocals, drums, keyboard / piano, and songwriting. Most range from $ 150 to $ 300 per month.

If painting, drawing, or any other physical art is more of your loved one’s thing, companies like The Art Studio NY offer group and private lessons for children and adults. Right now, classes are $ 25 off.

See: 11 Gifts You Should Buy For Christmas Now – Before They Sell

Academic or language courses

Sites like Udemy, Thinkific, and Teachable offer online courses on just about any topic you can think of, all without the college-level prices. Udemy, for example, currently offers a graphic design course for $ 90 for $ 14.99. A $ 95 data science course costs $ 16.99.

For those who prefer to learn a language rather than a subject, sites like Babbel, Mondly and FluentU let you discover the world with language lessons. For $ 83.40 – only $ 6.95 per month – you can give a full year of language instruction.

Find Out: The Best Holiday Toys, Gadgets & More To Buy Now – And What They’ll Cost You

A subscription

The loved one in your life might be one of the holdouts who still doesn’t have a subscription to one of the big music, streaming, or shopping sites because they’re not convinced it’s worth it. worth it. You could help them make that decision with a year of membership – or whatever you can afford – compliments from you. Treat the following memberships as a gift:

Tips: 5 Reasons You Need A Cash Back Card In Your Wallet

Electronic books

Books have always made great gifts, and today you can follow that tradition without paying to ship a rectangle of heavy paper across the country. You can give eBooks directly to recipients as gifts through Google Play, Apple Books, Barnes & Noble Nook, and perhaps the most popular of all, Amazon Kindle – Jeff Bezos, keep in mind, started as online bookseller. The process is similar in all formats. Find a book you like and look for an option that says something like “buy for others” or “give as a gift”. Give on a budget? The good news: eBooks are almost always cheaper than hardcover books and even paperbacks.

More from GOBankingTaux

Last updated: October 27, 2021

This article originally appeared on GOBankingRates.com: 4 Inexpensive Digital Gifts That Don’t Need To Ship


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BVSD school board hears update on hiring security advocates and phasing out SROs https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/bvsd-school-board-hears-update-on-hiring-security-advocates-and-phasing-out-sros/ Wed, 27 Oct 2021 03:23:10 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/bvsd-school-board-hears-update-on-hiring-security-advocates-and-phasing-out-sros/ Boulder Valley has hired 10 school safety advocates as the school district creates more equitable disciplinary practices while phasing out its school resource manager program. The school board heard an update on the district’s fair discipline work on Tuesday. In addition to voting in November to end the ORS program, the school board asked district […]]]>

Boulder Valley has hired 10 school safety advocates as the school district creates more equitable disciplinary practices while phasing out its school resource manager program.

The school board heard an update on the district’s fair discipline work on Tuesday. In addition to voting in November to end the ORS program, the school board asked district officials to develop new options to ensure safety and improve disciplinary practices.

The board agreed to make the change over concerns that students of color are more likely to be sanctioned, arrested, suspended or expelled. The district’s target date to end the ORS program is January.

Boulder Valley spokesman Randy Barber said he could not say how many ORS are still working in schools in the district, citing the district’s practice “of not commenting on specific safety arrangements in our schools.” .

Newly hired security advocates are now attending training sessions and are expected to start working in schools in the coming weeks, he said.

Security director Brendan Sullivan said he used feedback from eight stakeholder groups in the district on the tasks, knowledge and skills of security advocates, as well as the training they will need.

“These are our employees,” he said, adding that they will focus on restorative practices and will not be involved in enforcing discipline.

They will be part of the school’s leadership team and will work directly with students, he said. They are expected to be culturally competent, knowledgeable about the law and be able to handle emergencies. Their initial training includes anti-bias education, mental health first aid, cultural responsiveness, and non-violent crisis intervention.

Ten applicants have accepted positions to date, leaving one person to hire. Sixty percent of those hired are people of color, according to the district. Interviewers included representatives of the Parents of Color Council, Youth Equity Council, Equity Council, District Accountability Committee, and middle and high school leaders.

In addition to hiring safety advocates, the district hired five other school mental health advocates and a restorative practices coordinator this fall.

Janelle King, the restorative practices coordinator, said she is checking out what restorative practices are being used in high schools before starting to implement them in high schools in the district, with the intention of adding other grade levels. later.

Other security-related areas the district is still working on include revising memoranda of understanding with law enforcement agencies, including updating the language on information sharing and notifications. incidents. The district is also aligning its school emergency preparedness plans with best practices and assigning district staff to roles previously held by ORS.

Work completed on equitable discipline includes the school board adopting revised policies on student conduct and discipline in June, providing bullying prevention training to 500 teachers at the start of the school year. school year and the creation of more coherent systems for collecting data on the subject.

To measure the progress of its new practices, the district recently partnered with the Wellness Renee Crown Institute at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The institute plans to help the district identify ways to measure the progress of equity initiatives, as well as identify evaluation priorities.


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The Atlatnic editor says Glenn Youngkin supports threats of violence against school board members https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/the-atlatnic-editor-says-glenn-youngkin-supports-threats-of-violence-against-school-board-members/ Mon, 25 Oct 2021 21:42:14 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/the-atlatnic-editor-says-glenn-youngkin-supports-threats-of-violence-against-school-board-members/ Norman Ornstein, editor-in-chief of The Atlantic, boldly asserted that Republican candidate for governor of Virginia, Glenn Youngkin, supported the violent threats against school board members. Ornstein tweeted on Sunday about a Youngkin campaign ad that criticized the FBI and the Justice Department for investigating parents protesting school board meetings. In response, Ornstein concluded that Youngkin […]]]>

Norman Ornstein, editor-in-chief of The Atlantic, boldly asserted that Republican candidate for governor of Virginia, Glenn Youngkin, supported the violent threats against school board members.

Ornstein tweeted on Sunday about a Youngkin campaign ad that criticized the FBI and the Justice Department for investigating parents protesting school board meetings. In response, Ornstein concluded that Youngkin supported the violent threats against school board members.

GLENN YOUNGKIN SLAMS MCAULIFFE AFTER OBAMA VISIT: “DO ALL THAT HE CAN” TO SURVIVE

“Glenn Youngkin’s Schools and Parents ad attacks the FBI for preying on Virginia’s parents. In other words, Glenn Youngkin supports threats of violence against school board members. He is totally unfit for public office, ”Ornstein tweeted.

Virginians unite to support Glenn Youngkin
(Tyler O’Neil / Fox News)

In early October, the National School Boards Association (NSBA) wrote a letter to the Biden administration asking the FBI and the Department of Justice to investigate “threats of violence” against school board members. The letter was criticized for likening the protesting parents to acts of “domestic terrorism,” but Attorney General Merrick Garland announced days after the letter that the Justice Department would review the charges.

A week later, however, a report revealed that one of the disruptions cited by the NSBA as a “threat of violence” consisted of Scott Smith, a relative in Loudoun County, Va., Accusing the district of covering up the sexual assault of her daughter on June 22. Further investigation revealed that the Loudoun County Public School Superintendent was made aware of the allegation in May, but continued to say there was “no record of assault” after the arrest by Smith.

Several people criticized Ornstein’s tweet for ignoring these details in his accusation against Youngkin.

Virginia gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin (R-VA) greets the crowd at a campaign event with his wife Suzanne and Nikki Haley, the former governor of South Carolina and ambassador to the UN , in McLean, Virginia, United States, on July 14, 2021. REUTERS / Evelyn Hockstein

Virginia gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin (R-VA) greets the crowd at a campaign event with his wife Suzanne and Nikki Haley, the former governor of South Carolina and ambassador to the UN , in McLean, Virginia, United States, on July 14, 2021. REUTERS / Evelyn Hockstein
(REUTERS / Evelyn Hockstein)

“’Criticize law enforcement tactics and you’re actually pro-crime’ may not be the best long-term position for progressives,” tweeted Axios reporter Lachlan Markay.

Chris Rufo, senior researcher at the Manhattan Institute, wrote: “The tell is ‘in other words’, which are, in fact, entirely false and specious words coined by Norm Ornstein.”

“Except that’s not the subject of the investigation. I wonder if Ornstein has been keeping up with the news,” tweeted Dan McLaughlin, editor for the National Review.

The NSBA issued a letter on Friday apologizing for the “language” used in its original post to link parents to domestic terrorists.

“On behalf of the NSBA, we regret and apologize for the letter,” said the NSBA, noting that “there was no justification for some of the terms included in the letter.”

On Thursday, Garland insisted the Department of Justice and the FBI would not label parents as national terrorists, saying that “the Department of Justice supports and defends the right of First Amendment parents to complain as loudly as ‘they want it from the education of their children, from the curriculum taught. in schools.”

Attorney General Merrick Garland speaks during a Justice Department's House Judiciary Committee oversight hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington on Thursday, October 21, 2021 (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik)

Attorney General Merrick Garland speaks during a Justice Department’s House Judiciary Committee oversight hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington on Thursday, October 21, 2021 (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik)
(AP Photo / Andrew Harnik)

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Youngkin called for the resignation of Loudoun County School Board members for covering up the sexual assault case.

“There have to be resignations,” Youngkin said. “Actually, people who haven’t quit, I don’t understand how they can possibly attend their next school board meeting. How can they attend their next school board meeting and expect that did they sit there and represent our children’s future when they covered that up? “


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