Language school – Lycee Paul Claudel http://lycee-paul-claudel.com/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 06:42:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Language school – Lycee Paul Claudel http://lycee-paul-claudel.com/ 32 32 Spotlight on the first lady and her clothes during a trip to Madrid https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/spotlight-on-the-first-lady-and-her-clothes-during-a-trip-to-madrid/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 06:02:43 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/spotlight-on-the-first-lady-and-her-clothes-during-a-trip-to-madrid/ First lady Kim Keon-hee visits a Korean fashion exhibition at the Korean Cultural Center in Madrid on Tuesday. [JOINT PRESS CORPS] MADRID, Spain — First lady Kim Keon-hee took her first chance at soft diplomacy on the sidelines of a NATO summit in Madrid with a tour of a Korean fashion exhibit. Kim visited the […]]]>

First lady Kim Keon-hee visits a Korean fashion exhibition at the Korean Cultural Center in Madrid on Tuesday. [JOINT PRESS CORPS]

MADRID, Spain — First lady Kim Keon-hee took her first chance at soft diplomacy on the sidelines of a NATO summit in Madrid with a tour of a Korean fashion exhibit.

Kim visited the Korean Cultural Center on Tuesday afternoon during her first official activity in Madrid. She and President Yoon Suk-yeol began a five-day trip to Spain on Monday.

Kim, who worked as an exhibition planner, thanked the Cultural Center staff for their efforts to promote Korean culture and encouraged efforts to promote “K-pop, K-fashion, K-beauty and K-food” in Spain.

It was the first visit by a presidential spouse since the center opened in 2011.

Kim visited a Korean fashion exhibition at the center’s Han-ul gallery, showcasing clothes by designer Kim A-young, founder of the CAHIERS brand, which puts a contemporary twist on Hanbok, the traditional Korean dress. The exhibition “The old dresses with the new” will run until July 29.

“Spain is known around the world as the homeland of Velázquez and Picasso,” Kim said. “I am very happy that the first Korean fashion promotion exhibition is being held in Spain, a leading fashion country in the world.”

She noted that the fabric used in Korean clothing is “exceptional” and pointed out that “Korean culture is developing creatively.”

A staff member at the center told Kim, “There is a lot of interest in architecture, film, music and the Korean language, to the point that even a small town in Spain has a demand for an event. hallu.”

Kim visited a hanbok exhibition, workshops and a hangul (Korean language) school at the center.

President Yoon Seok-yeol, second left, and First Lady Kim Keon-hee, far right, pose for a commemorative photo with King Felipe VI of Spain and his wife Queen Letizia at the Royal Palace in Madrid Tuesday evening. [NEWS1]

President Yoon Seok-yeol, second left, and First Lady Kim Keon-hee, far right, pose for a commemorative photo with King Felipe VI of Spain and his wife Queen Letizia at the Royal Palace in Madrid Tuesday evening. [NEWS1]

Later Tuesday evening, Kim and Yoon attended a dinner hosted by Spain’s King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia.

Kim is also due to attend a series of events planned for the wives of leaders of NATO members and partner countries on Wednesday, including a tour of the Royal Palace and the art center of the Queen Sofia National Museum. Kim was also scheduled to visit a recycling store in Madrid and accompany Yoon to a dinner with Korean residents in Spain later that evening.

On Monday, Kim greeted reporters on Air Force One en route to Spain, her first contact with the press as first lady. She and her husband disembarked from the presidential jet hand in hand.

Kim’s wardrobe got a lot of attention. She wore a white one-piece dress when she arrived in the country and a black and white houndstooth suit paired with a black belt at the cultural center. For dinner, she wore a short-sleeved white cocktail dress paired with white gloves, a black clutch and black heels.

When US President Joe Biden visited Seoul last month, Kim briefly greeted him at the National Museum of Korea, but did not attend a state dinner because his counterpart, US First Lady Jill Biden , was not on the trip.

At the time, Biden told Yoon that they had both “got married.”

BY SARAH KIM [kim.sarah@joongang.co.kr]

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Antonio Banderas, Andrew Lloyd Webber Team on Amigos Para Siempre – Deadline https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/antonio-banderas-andrew-lloyd-webber-team-on-amigos-para-siempre-deadline/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 14:19:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/antonio-banderas-andrew-lloyd-webber-team-on-amigos-para-siempre-deadline/ Longtime friends and collaborators Antonio Banderas and Andrew Lloyd Webber are joining forces under the banner of the new company Amigos Para Siempre (APS), aiming to produce theatre, musicals and live entertainment shows, including some of Webber’s best-loved works, for major Spanish-speaking markets. As part of the move, the Spanish-language rights to Webber’s shows will […]]]>

Longtime friends and collaborators Antonio Banderas and Andrew Lloyd Webber are joining forces under the banner of the new company Amigos Para Siempre (APS), aiming to produce theatre, musicals and live entertainment shows, including some of Webber’s best-loved works, for major Spanish-speaking markets.

As part of the move, the Spanish-language rights to Webber’s shows will be handed over to the new company by the British composer’s London-based company Really Useful Group.

Shows for Spanish adaptations include The Phantom of the Opera, Sunset Boulevard, Starlight Express, Jesus Christ Superstar, Evita, Cinderella, Joseph and the incredible Technicolor Dreamcoat and school of rock.

The company’s name, which translates to “friends forever”, derives from a song Webber composed for the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, ​​which was performed at the closing ceremony by Sarah Brightman and Jose Carreras.

The pair announced the new initiative at a media event in the Spanish capital of Madrid on Monday.

“Not only is Antonio Banderas entertainment royalty, but he’s also one of the most versatile and creative minds I’ve had the pleasure of working with,” Webber said.

“It’s really exciting to partner with Antonio to bring my work, along with other brilliant Broadway and West End titles, to new markets. With millions of people in the Spanish-speaking world already enjoying our shows and our music, the appetite for more and the level of musical and theatrical talent is extraordinary.I look forward to working with Antonio to bring the highest quality Spanish language productions to the world.

Acting star Banderas, who has been based in his Spanish hometown of Malaga since 2019 after a stint in the UK and nearly two decades in Los Angeles, now devotes much of his time to his Soho Theatre, alongside performing feature film shooting commitments.

He launched the Malaga site, with the support of Spain Caixa Bank, end of 2019 with a Spanish-language production of a Broadway classic A chorus line.

He and Webber have been close ever since the actor played Ché, opposite Madonna, in Alan Parker’s 1996 adaptation of Avoided.

“I had the great privilege of working closely with Andrew during the recording and filming of his famous musical Avoided in 1996, but that’s when I saw Jesus Christ Superstar in the early 70’s that I became attached to the music, the theater and the fabulous talent of Andrew Lloyd Webber. says the actor.

“It wouldn’t be wrong to say that I became an actor because of the huge influence and the strong impression I felt when I saw Andrew’s musicals. Having the opportunity to work with one of the most respected and admired composers of all time, bringing his amazing works to Spanish-speaking audiences, is one of the highlights of my career in show business.

The new company will be overseen by Emanuel Nuñez, chief executive of NuCo Media Group and president of Really Useful Group, Jessica Koravos.

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ELS students elated at post COVID-19 graduation ceremony in Dubai https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/els-students-elated-at-post-covid-19-graduation-ceremony-in-dubai/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 13:27:27 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/els-students-elated-at-post-covid-19-graduation-ceremony-in-dubai/ Dubai: Students at the (private) English language school in Dubai were delighted to be honored at a post-Covid-19 graduation ceremony held after a two-year absence. “Thank goodness we got back to normal and were able to organize this event for our students,” said ELS school principal Rashid Ashraf. He said that ELS, which is a […]]]>

Dubai: Students at the (private) English language school in Dubai were delighted to be honored at a post-Covid-19 graduation ceremony held after a two-year absence.

“Thank goodness we got back to normal and were able to organize this event for our students,” said ELS school principal Rashid Ashraf. He said that ELS, which is a non-profit institute in Dubai, provides affordable education for students of various nationalities, mainly Pakistanis, pursuing their British (A-Level) education. He said credit goes to teachers, students and their parents for ensuring an evening of quality education during the challenges of Covid-19.

Hassan Afzal Khan, Consul General of Pakistan, along with other dignitaries present graduates with certificates during the Dubai English Language Private School 2022 graduation ceremony at the Pakistani Association of Dubai on June 22 2022. Photo Clint Egbert/Gulf News

About 60 students including 56 Pakistanis, two Filipinos and two Bangladeshis were honored at the ceremony held recently at the Pakistan Association auditorium in Dubai. The ceremony brought together parents, teachers, community members and diplomats.

“It is a wonderful effort on the part of ELS to organize such an amazing graduation ceremony for its students. I congratulate the students on their achievement as they have shown great resilience during the Covid- 19 to continue their studies and managed to get high scores,” Pakistan Consul General Hassan Afzal Khan said during an address on the occasion. He also handed out certificates and awards to students, teachers and members of the board of directors.

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Students enjoy the Dubai English Language Private School 2022 Graduation Ceremony celebrations at Pakistani Association Dubai on June 22, 2022. Photo Clint Egbert/Gulf News

“I have to say, this is a special class of 2021-2022 graduates who, despite everything, have passed with distinction and made their teachers and parents proud of them. I am sure you will continue to face life’s future challenges with the same passion and determination,” he added.

NAT 220622 Graduation CE015-1656163643191

Hassan Afzal Khan, Consul General of Pakistan, along with other dignitaries cut a celebratory cake at the Private English Language School Dubai 2022 graduation ceremony at Pakistani Association Dubai on June 22, 2022. Photo Clint Egbert/Gulf News

ELS Acting Director Mohammed Atif said ELS is one of the oldest schools in Dubai founded in 1978. It is conducive to achieving academic excellence but also builds the character of its students to successfully meet the challenges of an extremely competitive society,” he noted. Some 1800 students from 34 nationalities study at the school with a staff of 135 people.

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Generous Grant Enables Expansion of Refugee and Newcomer Services – Albuquerque Public Schools https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/generous-grant-enables-expansion-of-refugee-and-newcomer-services-albuquerque-public-schools/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 21:21:21 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/generous-grant-enables-expansion-of-refugee-and-newcomer-services-albuquerque-public-schools/ Job : June 23, 2022 Generous grant enables expansion of services for refugees and newcomers The $425,000 grant from the WK Kellogg Foundation will help students arriving from other countries and seeking asylum and refugee status in Albuquerque. The APS Education Foundation received the grant, which will be used to support the Albuquerque Public Schools […]]]>

Job : June 23, 2022

Generous grant enables expansion of services for refugees and newcomers

The $425,000 grant from the WK Kellogg Foundation will help students arriving from other countries and seeking asylum and refugee status in Albuquerque.

The APS Education Foundation received the grant, which will be used to support the Albuquerque Public Schools Refugee and Newcomer Support Program.

“Each year, tens of thousands of forced migrants arrive in the United States with the hope of building a new future for themselves and their families,” said Antonio Baca, program manager. “These children have witnessed some of the worst atrocities of modern times, yet they come to school hopeful and eager to learn.”

Funding from the WK Kellogg Foundation will create more learning opportunities and support for these students to help them reach their full potential. And the potential is great. Many speak several languages ​​and quickly become interpreters for family and friends.

The grant will help pay for:

  • A four-week newcomer summer program for middle and high school students
  • In-depth professional development for teachers and staff
  • High-quality education for newcomers to first grade at Del Norte High School
  • Opportunities for various APS departments to collaborate and develop messaging in different source languages
  • After-school programs

The number of students and families in need of guidance and resources continues to grow. Newcomer Program students are immigrants who may be unaccompanied minors, refugees or asylum seekers. Some have had a formal education and now face language barriers; others have received no formal education.

“We’ve funded several grants in schools to equip teachers with the tools they need to help newcomer students learn English and navigate their classrooms, but we’ve always hoped we could do more on a larger scale to these incredible students and their families. The generous grant from the WK Kellogg Foundation will allow us to do just that,” said Shannon Barnhill, Executive Director of the APS Education Foundation.

APS Superintendent Scott Elder added: “World events, including the war in Ukraine and the humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan, have resulted in the arrival of more newly arrived English language learners. in Albuquerque Public Schools. This grant from the WK Kellogg Foundation is timely, needed, and much appreciated. It will allow us to provide more programs for newcomer students, more training for teachers who work with these students, and more support for their families.

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Harvard and MIT students decry schools’ willingness to use global carbon offsets to meet city’s proposed requirements | New https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/harvard-and-mit-students-decry-schools-willingness-to-use-global-carbon-offsets-to-meet-citys-proposed-requirements-new/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 02:10:51 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/harvard-and-mit-students-decry-schools-willingness-to-use-global-carbon-offsets-to-meet-citys-proposed-requirements-new/ Ninety students from Harvard and MIT wrote an open letter on Wednesday calling on schools to eliminate their carbon emissions. The letter expressed support for Cambridge’s Green New Deal bill while criticizing the two universities’ willingness to use global carbon offsets to meet proposed emissions reductions without paying compliance fees. Cambridge is currently considering an […]]]>

Ninety students from Harvard and MIT wrote an open letter on Wednesday calling on schools to eliminate their carbon emissions.

The letter expressed support for Cambridge’s Green New Deal bill while criticizing the two universities’ willingness to use global carbon offsets to meet proposed emissions reductions without paying compliance fees.

Cambridge is currently considering an amendment to the city’s building energy use disclosure ordinance that would require owners of large properties to reduce carbon emissions or pay $234 per metric ton of excess emissions, with the aim of achieving net zero emissions from large buildings by 2035. .

Harvard and MIT, however, are looking at a third option to meet the proposed requirement: global carbon offsets — purchased credits that fund carbon reductions elsewhere in the world.

The open letter describes the impact of the offsets as “questionable at best”, saying schools must reduce emissions in Cambridge to have a meaningful impact.

“There is a legitimate way to avoid paying the $234 fee: by eliminating your carbon emissions,” the letter reads. “Because with your billion dollar endowments, trying to cut corners is irresponsible and dangerous. And as tuition paying students, we will not accept it.

The proposal is currently being assessed by Cambridge City Council’s Ordinances Committee. If approved, the amendment will go to the full board.

At ordinance meetings in February and April, representatives from MIT and Harvard argued for language in the proposal that would allow carbon offsets to meet emissions reduction requirements.

School representatives also questioned whether the city’s power grid could support the proposed 2035 schedule.

In April, universities, along with several other Cambridge organizations, submitted proposed revisions to the November 2021 amendment calling for global carbon credits to be allowed to offset 100% of organizations’ carbon emissions under BEUDO. .

The committee did not adopt the revisions, although the wording is subject to change.

Owen O. Ebose ’25, one of the students who wrote the letter, said he opposed the use of offsets because they would allow Harvard and MIT to “maintain the status quo” while failing. solve the climate crisis locally.

“We can offset our emissions as much as we want, but to tackle the climate crisis we need to get our emissions down to zero,” Ebose said. “They’re trying to distract instead of really taking responsibility for actually reducing their emissions.”

The $234 per metric ton fee could be considered a “local carbon offset,” Ebose said. According to the amendment proposed by the Council, these funds will be devoted to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions at Cambridge.

Ebose added that some global carbon offsets are “significantly cheaper” than compliance fees, however – as low as $20 per metric ton. Nonetheless, Harvard would be able to “claim reductions” in its carbon footprint under the University’s proposed revisions, the letter argues.

In an email Thursday, University spokeswoman Amy Kamosa declined to comment on the letter, but wrote that Harvard is committed to climate sustainability efforts, citing the University’s stated goals. to become fossil fuel neutral by 2026 and fossil fuel free by 2050.

Harvard failed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions on campus between 2016 and 2020, according to the University’s most recent data. Still, Harvard officials maintain the school is on track to meet its 2026 and 2050 goals.

According to Kamosa, the 2026 goal aims to reduce global emissions in the near future while working toward long-term reductions in emissions on campus.

Henry Lee ’68, a member of Harvard’s Presidential Committee on Sustainability, said while the offsets are “extremely controversial,” they are necessary for the university to meet its climate goals while maintaining active development on campus and expansion efforts in Allston.

“Harvard was clearly not going to be able to do that by directly reducing its own usage,” Lee said. “His campus expansion, his new projects — the emissions from those offset most of the cuts he’s made.”

Lee, who co-chaired a subcommittee examining Harvard’s fossil fuel neutrality goal, said he and other faculty members had developed guidelines for selecting offsets. The criteria include ensuring that the credits support innovative work aligned with the University’s research goals and that they generate new carbon reduction initiatives – as opposed to funding those that have already taken place, it said. -he declares. He added that the University will likely purchase offsets in accordance with these criteria in 2023 and 2024.

Owen Leddy, Ph.D. MIT candidate who signed the letter said that verifying the effectiveness of offsets is often impractical.

“One of the things that’s really difficult about global offsets is verifying that the offset actually reduces emissions significantly,” Leddy said. “Often these greenhouse gas emissions – these projects that offsets are supposed to fund – would have happened anyway without the offset being paid.”

Advisers met with representatives from Harvard and MIT in a closed meeting last Thursday. The Council Ordinance Committee is scheduled to hold a public comment session on Wednesday, during which the BEUDO amendment will be discussed.

The session was originally scheduled for May 25 but was canceled due to a lack of attendance from councillors.

Leddy said he hoped many residents would sign up to support the proposed Green New Deal legislation at Wednesday’s meeting.

“I think it’s especially important for members of the MIT and Harvard community to speak up,” Leddy said. “Right now, the MIT and Harvard administrations are a very strong voice in the ears of the city council.”

— Brandon L. Kingdollar, Crimson writer, can be reached at brandon.kingdollar@thecrimson.com. Follow him on Twitter @newskingdollar.

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New principals hired for Holland High School, Jefferson Elementary https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/new-principals-hired-for-holland-high-school-jefferson-elementary/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 16:02:16 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/new-principals-hired-for-holland-high-school-jefferson-elementary/ HOLLAND — Two Dutch public school buildings officially have new leaders after the school board approved a handful of administrative hires this week. During a study session on Monday, June 13, the HPS Board of Education approved five administrative hires, including new principals at Jefferson Elementary and Holland High. Deputy directors of Jefferson and Holland […]]]>

HOLLAND — Two Dutch public school buildings officially have new leaders after the school board approved a handful of administrative hires this week.

During a study session on Monday, June 13, the HPS Board of Education approved five administrative hires, including new principals at Jefferson Elementary and Holland High. Deputy directors of Jefferson and Holland Middle were also approved, as was a new deputy chief financial officer.

Andrea Mehall will be the new principal of Holland High School for the 2022-23 school year. She came to HPS in 2014 and has since been Principal of Holland Early College. His previous roles include teaching science, human biology/anatomy and physiology.

Mehall succeeds Katie Pennington, who moved into the role of associate superintendent of human resources this month.

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An NGO seeks to include sign language in the school curriculum https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/an-ngo-seeks-to-include-sign-language-in-the-school-curriculum/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 00:36:33 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/an-ngo-seeks-to-include-sign-language-in-the-school-curriculum/ A non-governmental organization, Friends Of People With Disability, has called on the Lagos State government to include sign language in the school curriculum, for educational inclusiveness for people with physical disabilities across the state. Speaking at the recent launch of the Sign Language Club in Lagos, FOPWD Executive Director Aku Orduh said the initiative was […]]]>

A non-governmental organization, Friends Of People With Disability, has called on the Lagos State government to include sign language in the school curriculum, for educational inclusiveness for people with physical disabilities across the state.

Speaking at the recent launch of the Sign Language Club in Lagos, FOPWD Executive Director Aku Orduh said the initiative was a way to celebrate barrier children who had defied the rigors of disability while striving to learn a language.

In his assessment of the sign language system in Nigeria, Orduh said: “Today, knowledge of sign language is an advantage in gaining employment in some establishments, just as computer knowledge was. a few years ago, when the computer was not common. too.

”Lagos State has taken viable and valuable steps to show that sign language is necessary for workplaces to meet people’s needs.

”We recommend and urge the Lagos State Government to include sign language in its school curriculum.

“More so, continuous assessment in primary and secondary schools is not based only on the core subjects of the class, therefore, continuous assessment can take into account the knowledge of sign language that a child acquired before leaving school.

The group also said it has embarked on a series of public and enlightenment campaigns across Lagos State, reaching hundreds of people with disabilities and helping them to overcome the stereotype of social discrimination and stigma. segregation.

All rights reserved. This material and any other digital content on this website may not be reproduced, published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or in part without the prior express written permission of PUNCH.

Contact: the editorial staff[at]punchng.com

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JCPS fires teacher who used N-word at Carrithers Middle School – 89.3 WFPL News Louisville https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/jcps-fires-teacher-who-used-n-word-at-carrithers-middle-school-89-3-wfpl-news-louisville/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 09:31:04 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/jcps-fires-teacher-who-used-n-word-at-carrithers-middle-school-89-3-wfpl-news-louisville/ Jefferson County Public Schools fired a teacher last month who insulted students and used the N-word in a middle school class. Records obtained by WFPL News show Thomas Hicks, a math teacher at Carrithers Middle School, received notice of termination on May 2, 2022. Hicks’ termination letter says the district terminated his contract “based on […]]]>

Jefferson County Public Schools fired a teacher last month who insulted students and used the N-word in a middle school class.

Records obtained by WFPL News show Thomas Hicks, a math teacher at Carrithers Middle School, received notice of termination on May 2, 2022. Hicks’ termination letter says the district terminated his contract “based on insubordination, conduct unbecoming a teacher, inefficiency, incompetence and dereliction of duty.”

“You and another teacher used racially insensitive language and profanity in the presence of students,” reads the letter, describing the March 18 incident at Carrithers. “You have humiliated and embarrassed students in front of their peers by singling out specific students…you have repeatedly used the n-word, cracker, and profanity, among other things.”

Hicks and a second teacher, Lori Hays, were reassigned in March after an 8-minute video surfaced on social media showing teachers berating a group of students.

Hays did not swear in the video, but dismissed ‘COVID trauma’ as an excuse for bad behavior and said she was ‘tired’ of hearing about the role race plays in police interactions .

Records show Hays was initially fired, but the action was overturned after Hays filed a grievance challenging her dismissal. JCPS spokeswoman Carolyn Callahan confirmed that Hays is still employed by the JCPS.

Neither Hays nor Hicks responded to requests for comment Tuesday afternoon.

Records show history of difficulty managing student behavior

Hicks had a history of struggling with student behavior, and the teacher described himself as traumatized by his interactions with students, records show.

“You claim to have been physically threatened by several students. You allege that you have been verbally and physically assaulted by students and that students use homophobic, racial and derogatory language towards each other and towards adults…You said you were told, according to the time of during the day, that administrators may not be able to answer calls due to lunchroom duties, which you say puts teachers in check,” reads Hicks’ termination letter.

His termination letter also describes an October 2021 incident, in which the teacher lost consciousness and was treated by EMS after an argument with a student.

According to a transcript of a 2021 due process meeting, Hicks grabbed a student by the backpack after the student refused to put on his mask and insulted teachers. Hicks said the student pushed and elbowed him. He told administrators he “could feel like he was getting ready to have a panic attack” and walked to the parking lot where he passed out.

In response to the incident, Carrithers Middle School principal Marcella Franklin-Williams directed Hicks “not to pursue any student in any situation, but to notify the office or an administrator.”

Hicks told his union representative and Franklin-Williams that he gave the profanity-laden lecture in March 2022 after students entered the classroom throwing books, coins, shouting and shouting. using inappropriate language.

According to the letter, Hicks said he “felt cornered and had a ‘fight-flight-freeze’ reaction caused by trauma.”

Ultimately, district administrators determined that Hicks’ behavior on March 18, 2022 violated state and district policy. Franklin-Williams recommended termination.

“All students have the right to be treated with courtesy, respect and dignity, to be valued members of the school community, and to learn in a positive and safe environment,” Franklin-Williams wrote in her assessment of the ‘incident.

Seventh grader facing the fallout

Cheri Allen, whose daughter recorded the March 2022 incident on a mobile device, told the WFPL in May that she hoped Hicks’ firing would be a lesson for other educators, “that they should be more patient with the children and not picking on it”.

However, Allen said she was upset with the school’s general reaction. She said two other teachers confronted her seventh grade daughter and slammed her for sharing the video and talking about it to the media.

“She feels like she’s been shunned,” Allen said.

Allen said her daughter had to change her schedule to avoid some teachers. For a while, she wanted to transfer to a new school. But lately she’s been thinking about holding on for eighth grade.

“A lot of her peers tried to talk her into staying,” Allen said. “The kids think she’s a hero.”

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Thousands march in action against gun violence in the United States https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/thousands-march-in-action-against-gun-violence-in-the-united-states/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 20:17:02 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/thousands-march-in-action-against-gun-violence-in-the-united-states/ WASHINGTON: Thousands of people took to the streets across the United States on Saturday to press for action against the devastating gun violence plaguing the country, where Republican politicians have repeatedly blocked efforts to enact tougher laws on firearms. Protesters of all ages flocked to the National Mall in Washington, where a gun violence prevention […]]]>

WASHINGTON: Thousands of people took to the streets across the United States on Saturday to press for action against the devastating gun violence plaguing the country, where Republican politicians have repeatedly blocked efforts to enact tougher laws on firearms.

Protesters of all ages flocked to the National Mall in Washington, where a gun violence prevention group placed more than 45,000 white vases containing flowers – one for every person killed by a gun in the United States in 2020.

“Protect people, not guns,” read a sign held by a protester near the Washington Monument. “Fear has no place in schools,” read another.

Two horrific shootings last month – one at a Texas elementary school that killed 19 young children and two teachers, and another at a New York supermarket that left 10 black people dead – helped spark the call for demonstrations.

But the problem of gun violence – which has killed more than 19,300 people so far this year in the United States, according to Gun Violence Archive – goes far beyond the high-profile massacres, with more than half of those killed due to suicide.

“The will of the American people is being subverted by a minority,” said Cynthia Martins, a 63-year-old resident of the American capital, in reference to the Republican Party.

She carried a sign that used the party’s “GOP” nickname to spell “Guns Over People.”

“There’s a reason we’re still in this situation and there are still mass shootings,” Martins said, adding, “Wringing your hands won’t do anything – you have to make your voice heard.”

Garnell Whitfield, whose 86-year-old mother was killed in the racist supermarket shooting in Buffalo, New York, on May 14, spoke from a stage at the Washington protest.

“We are here to demand justice,” Whitfield said. “We are here to support those who are bold enough to demand sensible gun legislation.”

The protests were organized by March for Our Lives, which was founded by survivors of a high school shooting in Parkland, Florida, who staged a rally that drew hundreds of thousands to the nation’s capital in March 2018.

Protesters marched through Parkland on Saturday, carrying signs with messages such as “Am I next?” and “Books Not Bulletproof Backpacks”.

Widespread outrage, little change

Protesters also traveled to New York, with protests planned in hundreds of locations across the country.

The ease of access to guns and the mental health issues that can lead to their use in attacks have both been in the spotlight following the May 24 shooting at Robb Elementary in Uvalde, Texas.

The massacre was carried out by a gunman who bought two assault rifles shortly after turning 18.

Gun control advocates are calling for tighter restrictions or an outright ban on these guns, one of which was also used in Buffalo. But opponents of tougher regulations have sought to make mass shootings primarily a mental health issue, not a weapons issue.

The frequent mass shootings have sparked widespread outrage in the United States, where a majority of people support tougher gun laws, but opposition from many Republican lawmakers has long stood in the way of major changes.

The Democratic-controlled House of Representatives this week passed a wide range of proposals, including raising the purchase age for most semi-automatic rifles from 18 to 21, but the party has not 60 votes required to advance him to the Senate.

A cross-party group of senators has also been working on a narrow set of controls that could become the first serious attempt at gun regulatory reform in decades.

The package would increase funding for mental health services and school safety, narrowly expand background checks and encourage states to institute “red flag laws” that allow authorities to confiscate weapons from individuals deemed a threat.

But it doesn’t include an assault weapons ban or universal background checks, meaning it won’t meet the expectations of President Joe Biden, progressive Democrats and anti-gun violence activists.

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Interview with Uvalde Police Chief Pete Arredondo: Five Takeaways https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/interview-with-uvalde-police-chief-pete-arredondo-five-takeaways/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 01:37:53 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/interview-with-uvalde-police-chief-pete-arredondo-five-takeaways/ Sign up for The Brief, our daily newsletter that keeps readers informed about Texas’ most essential news. Editor’s Note: This story contains explicit language. This week, Uvalde Schools Police Chief Pete Arredondo and his attorney gave an exclusive interview to the Texas Tribune to detail his version of what happened inside Robb Elementary School on […]]]>

Arredondo never thought he was the incident commander

The decision to leave the radio was intentional

He was blocked by a door

His strategy was to save as many children as possible

Law enforcement experts say Arredondo made critical mistakes

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