Learning budget – Lycee Paul Claudel http://lycee-paul-claudel.com/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 22:23:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Learning budget – Lycee Paul Claudel http://lycee-paul-claudel.com/ 32 32 Lawmakers reach agreement on budget https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/lawmakers-reach-agreement-on-budget/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/lawmakers-reach-agreement-on-budget/ In the final week before the end of the fiscal year, the Republican-led House and Senate agreed to a budget compromise that includes a 4.2% average increase for teachers for 2022-23, bringing the total teacher salary increase to 6.7%. Last year’s long session budget provided for an average salary increase of 2.5% in the second […]]]>

In the final week before the end of the fiscal year, the Republican-led House and Senate agreed to a budget compromise that includes a 4.2% average increase for teachers for 2022-23, bringing the total teacher salary increase to 6.7%.

Last year’s long session budget provided for an average salary increase of 2.5% in the second year of the biennium, so the proposed new salary increase is on top of that. Entry-level teachers will now start at $37,000 instead of just over $35,000 they previously received.

“The rise of new teachers with inflationary pressures and labor market issues, I think that’s a big step forward,” Rep. Jeffrey Elmore, R-Wilkes, said at a press conference. tuesday.

Here is the new salary grid for teachers.

Here is the old one:

The budget also includes a new teacher bonus program that ties payment to the teacher’s student growth scores.

Additionally, non-certified personnel, such as bus drivers, will either get a 4% wage increase or their wages will go up to $15 an hour. They will get whoever is the most.

school safety

While teacher salaries are always the high point of any budget, given the recent school shooting in Uvalde, Texas, this budget also includes additional funds for school safety.

The Legislature is investing $32 million in the School Safety Grant Program, including money for school safety training and school safety equipment. Additionally, lawmakers are giving public schools $15 million for the School Resource Officer Grant Program, focusing the money on elementary and middle schools. The plan also increases the state match. Previously, the state gave $2 for every $1 provided by a district. This plan increases that is $4 for every $1.

Another $26 million will go toward an allocation to help districts provide a school resource officer for each high school.

Local supplements

One of the most innovative aspects of the long-session budget was a plan to distribute $100 million among school districts to provide local supplements. The money was distributed to localities with an emphasis on districts with fewer resources to provide their own local supplements. The new budget brings funding for this plan to a total of $170 million.

Opportunity scholarships

A controversial measure championed by Republicans is the Opportunity Scholarship Program, which gives public funds to students to attend private schools. It started as a program for the poorest students in the state, but over time lawmakers expanded the number of students eligible for the program. Opponents often call it a voucher program.

In the new budget, lawmakers invested $56 million in the scholarship reserve and expanded income eligibility to 200% of the amount students need to qualify for a free or discounted lunch .

Transportation

One of the main concerns of the State Board of Education and the State Department of Public Instruction (DPI) is rising fuel costs for school transportation. The budget provides $32 million for a reserve of transportation fuel that DPI can use to help districts that need help. The money for this is non-recurring.

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Pre-K

Last year’s budget increased the reimbursement rate that child care centers get for NC Pre-K by 4% in the biennium. The new budget increases it by an additional 5% for a total increase of 9% in 2022-2023.

According to EdNC Early Childhood Education reporter Liz Bell, “The rate hike is intended to address disparities in teacher pay between schools. Centers have long struggled to retain teachers, and the pandemic has exacerbated the problem. »

hold harmless

While the long-session budget passed last year included a disclaimer for districts that saw a drop in average daily enrollment due to COVID-19, it only applied to the first year of the biennium. The disclaimer ensures that districts do not receive less funding due to a decline in student population.

The budget retained by lawmakers this week does not provide for an exoneration for 2022-23.

Leandro

The long-running Leandro case is currently before the North Carolina Supreme Court, and it will ultimately decide whether a judge’s decision to force the state to pay $1.7 billion to fund the plan was appropriate or not. .

Meanwhile, Every Child NC, a group advocating the Leandro multi-year plan that aims to bring the state into line with its constitutional duty on education, said on Twitter that the budget funds about half of what is requested in the plan.

Sen. Phil Berger, R-Rockingham, was asked at a news conference on Tuesday whether Leandro was part of lawmakers’ scrutiny as the budget was being crafted.

“I think what we’ve done is we’ve looked at what the public education funding requirements are in North Carolina and we’ve allocated funds to do that,” he said. declared. “How that equates to what a California nonprofit has determined to be an appropriate amount, I can’t say.”

The reference to the California nonprofit is to WestEd, the organization that originally developed an action plan to help the state align with its constitutional obligations.

A protest aimed at getting lawmakers to address Leandro occurred outside the General Assembly as the budget was heard by lawmakers in a joint appropriations committee.

Community colleges

Community college staff receive an additional general salary increase of 1%. This is for most employees. If an employee is paid on an experience-based salary scale, they get a 2% salary increase. Last year, lawmakers implemented a 2.5% pay raise for community college staff. The increases in this budget are on top of that.

However, the budget also cuts funding for community colleges across the state by just over $12 million to account for the 2,009 decrease in “full-time equivalent students” at community colleges.

There’s also money in the budget for myFutureNC, the organization charged with helping the state achieve its goal “that by 2030, 2 million North Carolinas will have a post-secondary degree or credential.”

In addition to a $250,000 grant directly to the organization, there is $500,000 for an Interoperable Student Data Systems Study Fund and $160,000 for a National Center Data Fund. exchange of student information.

Other things to note

The budget provides funds to ensure that students who qualify for the discounted lunch can eat for free. Recent legislation at the federal level would also have provided this coverage.

Additionally, in line with DPI’s push for reading science to be integrated into reading instruction, the budget provides money for 124 literacy coaches and early learning specialists. This is something the State Board of Education and the DPI advocated.

Infrastructure is also a big concern for districts across the state, with billions needed across the state to repair and construct school buildings. The budget takes $431 million from the North Carolina Education Lottery in the fiscal year and puts it into the needs-based public schools capital fund.

The bill also includes funding for three new innovative cooperative high schools. They are:

  • Cabarrus Early College of Health Sciences
  • EDGE Academy of Health Sciences
  • Wake Early College of Information and Biotechnology

In total, legislators are providing $29.2 million in 2022-23 for innovative cooperative high schools.

Feminine hygiene products will become easier for female students to access within the budget. The budget includes a recurring amount of $250,000 so that schools can obtain grants to provide such products.

The pilot for the state’s two virtual charter schools — which have historically performed poorly — has been extended for two years through the 2024-25 school year.

The budget was taken up again today in the Joint Appropriations Committee, but only for discussion. Since the budget was written as a conference report, no amendments can be added and it will only receive a yes or no vote when it reaches the floor of the House and Senate. This article will be updated as the budget moves through the legislative process.

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MRDC leaders look forward to a bright future in Marion County | Tuesday News https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/mrdc-leaders-look-forward-to-a-bright-future-in-marion-county-tuesday-news/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/mrdc-leaders-look-forward-to-a-bright-future-in-marion-county-tuesday-news/ FAIRMONT — In the six months since gaining state developer status, the Marion Regional Development Corp. has caught up a lot. About seven years ago, Marion County lost its Certified Place of Business status. When this happened, MRDC President Nick Fantasia said it was tantamount to removing the ‘for sale’ sign from the yard while […]]]>

FAIRMONT — In the six months since gaining state developer status, the Marion Regional Development Corp. has caught up a lot.

About seven years ago, Marion County lost its Certified Place of Business status. When this happened, MRDC President Nick Fantasia said it was tantamount to removing the ‘for sale’ sign from the yard while trying to sell the house.

“Due to the change in attitude towards economic development a few years ago, we removed this sign from our yard. Thanks to Commissioners Randy Elliott and Linda Longstreth, we were able to market ourselves again,” Fantasia said. “They passed the baton to the city and the council approved us and now we’re back in the market.”

It’s been six months since that stint, but it hasn’t really been a sprint for Fantasia and its affectionately described part-time developer team. For much of the past few months, they’ve been making up for lost time, learning to walk before they can run.

But that doesn’t mean they haven’t been busy.

Some of the MRDC’s major accomplishments include regaining Marion County’s status as a certified development site, becoming the developer of the Sharon Steel site, and establishing a name for the county in the Corridor of Interstate 79.

All things considered, Fantasia said the MRDC does a great job for an organization made up of volunteers and a part-time director. However, he and his compatriots have goals for the future of the company, far above what it is now.

Among these objectives is an increase in its budget. Currently, the MRDC operates on a budget of just over $90,000 consisting of funds from the Town of Fairmont, the Marion County Commission, and some grants.

Neighboring Monongalia and Harrison counties fund full-time development operations. Harrison’s budget is north of $190,000 and Mon’s is over $300,000. Allen Staggers, executive director of the MRDC, said Marion County needs to consider a more feasible budget if it hopes to keep pace with its neighbors.

“We’re not quite on par with our neighboring counties, but they’ve both had economic development organizations in place for many years now. Long-term presence is one of the critical factors for development,” said said Staggers. “Going forward, I think we should really look carefully at what a realistic and sustainable budget needs to be, and then look at potential funding sources.”

During a recent presentation to the county commission, Staggers was open about budget concerns and raised another point for consideration — a full-time manager.

Staggers is coming out of retirement to take on the post of head of the MRDC and he told the commission candidly that a full-time director is a necessary step, and that he is not the man for the job.

“It’s work that often requires a deep understanding of economic development and an extensive network of resources. Those resources can be state or federal agencies or other developers,” Staggers said. “I can do them part-time, but if we had someone full-time, it would be an opportunity to form this network.”

In the near future, the MRDC will focus on expanding the organization from the former Fairmont Coke Works site to develop the Fairmont Transportation Research Campus, a test site for autonomous vehicles. The concept was submitted and approved by the Fairmont City Council.

Fantasia expressed excitement for what this can mean for Fairmont and Marion County as they have the opportunity to welcome new industry to the area.

“I strongly believe that if we have the opportunity to compete for this infrastructure money and build this transportation campus, I think there is an opportunity to transform the face of the community with the emergence of an industry that we’ve never had before,” says Fancy. “I think we are on the verge of an exciting time.”

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Elected LG representatives from merged areas receive training https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/elected-lg-representatives-from-merged-areas-receive-training/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 05:11:16 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/elected-lg-representatives-from-merged-areas-receive-training/ PESHAWAR: The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) have partnered with the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa (KP) government’s Local Governance School (LGS) to train the newly elected from the merged areas (MA) on local government. (LG), which was introduced for the first time in MA’s history in Pakistan. The trainings, […]]]>

PESHAWAR:

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) have partnered with the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa (KP) government’s Local Governance School (LGS) to train the newly elected from the merged areas (MA) on local government. (LG), which was introduced for the first time in MA’s history in Pakistan.

The trainings, supported under the USAID-funded Merged Areas Governance Project (MAGP) implemented by UNDP, took place in Peshawar with a total of 262 tehsil counselors, including 49 women counselors, as well as councilors representing religious minorities in Bajaur and Mohmand districts. .

“This is a learning curve for newly elected councillors, and we help them understand the decentralization of power, the structure and composition of local governments, and the authority and responsibilities of elected representatives” , said Raluca Eddon, program manager for MAGP. UNDP.

Secretary of Local Government, Elections and Rural Development, Syed Zaheerul Islam Shah appreciated the participants’ passion for learning and said that the provincial government has allocated a development budget of Rs 37 billion to local bodies to improve service delivery.

Azra Gul, General Counsel of Lower Mohmand Subdivision, said the training has helped her understand the LG system and she will now effectively serve women in her community.

Published in L’Express Tribune, June 25e2022.

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Why we all need to care about the food industry https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/why-we-all-need-to-care-about-the-food-industry/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 13:30:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/why-we-all-need-to-care-about-the-food-industry/ Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur the contributors are theirs. Before Covid-19, few would have entertained the idea of ​​a country like America running out of basic items like corn and infant formula. Since the pandemic, restaurants have closed, deliveries have exploded and consumer preferences have changed. At the same time, supply chain issues have become a […]]]>

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur the contributors are theirs.

Before Covid-19, few would have entertained the idea of ​​a country like America running out of basic items like corn and infant formula. Since the pandemic, restaurants have closed, deliveries have exploded and consumer preferences have changed. At the same time, supply chain issues have become a worrying new normal that goes beyond empty supermarket shelves.

We will see the effects on menus when we dine in restaurants and cafes, as protein, fryer oil, packaging materials and spare parts for appliances become harder to find. Add to that a massive resignation and lack of chefs, food servers, farmers, field workers and anyone working with food industry-wide, and prices will continue to rise. sharply. Birthday parties, weddings, even when corporate executives want to impress investors or celebrate team experiences with corporate functions, they will feel that tighter pressure on their budget. Food companies support families and boost economies, but since the pandemic we have learned the hard way just how important a functioning food industry really is.

I may have retired from my day job, but I didn’t quit this industry. In my new approach to business – as a consumer and expert advisor, not a CEO – I see so much more. It turns out that the people’s diet industry is huge. As I began to realize how many moving parts really go into supplying people with food, the whole set of considerations for improving quality and safety, and how all of the moving parts in a food business actually work, here’s a few that surprised me.

Related: 3 Ways Small Businesses Can Survive the Supply Chain Crisis

Bigger than a bread box

Restaurants may not seem like an integral part of a functioning economy, but they generate jobs, not only for staff and management, but also in agriculture and transportation. In the United States alone, the food industry generates approximately 5% of total GDP, supports 11% of employment and accounts for 10% of consumer discretionary income. Globally, food consumption accounts for $4 trillion in expenditure. When restaurants thrive, the food industry behind them thrives, and when restaurants crash, the economy can follow.

From the waitress serving our meal, to the chefs who cook it, the management who run the restaurant, and the truckers, farmers, brewers and distillers who supply it; even technological innovators play a vital role in putting food on our table, and each moving element has its own complexity. Attention to detail in ethics and sustainability at every point of production, especially during an economic downturn, can give companies in a struggling industry a competitive edge.

Three guys who opened a beer garden in Pasadena, Calif., celebrate their food like no one else in the industry, considering every angle of every moving part to bring the most value to their consumers. They make sure their products are ethically sourced, use readily available locally available ingredients whenever possible, and buy everything from the right people. When consumers sit down to dinner in their restaurant, they feel confident that they know and approve of every aspect of the financial support they provide.

Related: The Future of Food: How Biotechnology Will Save Us All

A leader is more than a leader

All my years running a business in the food industry have never prepared me for what I’ve learned serving on corporate boards. When I accepted the position on the James Beard Foundation Board of Directors, I thought the company was just celebrating great leaders and focusing on what I could contribute to the rewards aspect of their business. Of course, being a James Beard Award-winning chef is the pinnacle of their brand, but being on their board taught me the real work they do to support a chef’s journey.

The foundation helps train young chefs to understand what it takes beyond good cooking. They offer workshops and programs on the business side of being a chef. Vocational training can keep them competitive, and better tools give them more ways to make great food, and everyone’s contribution helps them continue to keep their craft. Suddenly, the conversation around the food industry has widened to include knife makers, appliance makers, and cutting-edge culinary technologies.

Like many industries, chefs need greater representation and the foundation is working to make the restaurant industry more inclusive. Women make up less than a quarter of the country’s chefs and, on average, they earn more than $10,000 less than men. The foundation therefore offers programs to support more female chefs in the industry. My experience on the foundation’s board of directors drew my attention to the link between food and major social issues, such as diversity and gender equality. Learning all the intricacies of being a chef opened my eyes to the true size of the food industry.

Related: The 3 best food stocks to buy now

We can manage the industry better

Working for a big franchise, it might seem like I learned everything there was to know about the food industry, but now I’m learning how to do it better. Since my retirement, I started consulting, I started to see the industry on a much larger scale and I can now advise on aspects that I never had time for as CEO: the vertical integration of raw materials, competitive purchasing and global markets. Consulting gives me even more ways to see and participate in an industry that I have always loved and allows me to offer my years of expertise to the next generation who will lead the innovation of this industry.

It may be huge and essential for our economy, but there will always be new considerations to make the food industry and everything it touches bigger and better. Consumer demand continues to drive sustainability, and I love watching the transition as people pay more attention to the trend, making it less expensive and easier to participate in and evolve. I visited a new paper mill producing sustainable packaging items – a move away from plastic and an exciting new direction for the industry. The beauty of business is seeing new generations take what we’ve done well and do it better. This is how an industry not only grows to enormity, but thrives.

Related: Market forces alone are unlikely to solve the food security problem

Business strategies, entrepreneurial tips and inspirational stories are all in one place. Discover the new Entrepreneur’s Bookstore.

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Parkland raises taxes for the first time in 2 years https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/parkland-raises-taxes-for-the-first-time-in-2-years/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 22:23:40 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/parkland-raises-taxes-for-the-first-time-in-2-years/ The Parkland School District will raise property taxes for the first time in two years, after the school board approved the district’s budget for 2022-23 on Tuesday. In a 6-3 vote, council approved the $216.2 million budget, which includes a 1.2% property tax increase. This increase will generate $1.67 million in property taxes, as the […]]]>

The Parkland School District will raise property taxes for the first time in two years, after the school board approved the district’s budget for 2022-23 on Tuesday.

In a 6-3 vote, council approved the $216.2 million budget, which includes a 1.2% property tax increase. This increase will generate $1.67 million in property taxes, as the district projects a 7.5% increase in spending for the coming year.

The new mileage rate is 15.90, which reflects an increase of 0.19 mils from 2021-22. A homeowner whose home is valued at $245,193, the district average, will see their property taxes go up by $17.64.

Board members Jarrett Coleman, Patrick Foose and Jay Rohatgi voted against the budget, citing higher taxes.

Coleman declared victory over State Senator Pat Browne in the Republican primary for the 16th Senate District last month.

Coleman, Foose and Rohatgi said the district should not raise taxes at a time when gasoline and food prices are at record highs.

“I don’t think this tax is appropriate,” Foose said at Tuesday’s meeting. “We are facing a severe global inflation crisis. …As costs rise, districts must support our families in their hour of financial need.

The three dissenting council members also noted that the district had previously suggested other budget options to the council that did not raise taxes. These options were based more on Parkland’s fund balance.

In the approved 2022-23 budget, the district is already counting down $5.1 million of its fund balance.

However, the 1.2% property tax increase is still less than the 3.4% allowed by the state’s Act 1 index, which determines the maximum increases in most taxes a school district can. take.

Parkland has not raised taxes to the authorized index for the past six years.

Additionally, the value of the Homestead/Farmstead Property Tax Relief Funds is $139.92 per approved property, which equates to a tax reduction of $28.58 more than the previous year.

Last call

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Board Chairman David Hein and Vice-Chair Carol Facchiano voted for the budget, along with Board Members Robert Cohen, Lisa Roth, Annette Wilcox and Marisa Ziegler.

“I understand that raising taxes at any time will never be a popular decision,” Wilcox said Tuesday. “Unfortunately, this rising cost is also affecting the neighborhood. We need to transport and feed our students, heat our buildings, make building repairs and upgrades, and pay competitive raises to attract and retain staff at a time when shortages of teachers and bus drivers are happening across the board. national scale.

Roth said the district needs to raise taxes now, as it grows, so the district has the money to build another school building, if it becomes necessary in the future. Ziegler also said Parkland already has the lowest mileage rate in Lehigh County.

The budget includes plans for the 10th year of capital improvement projects. These investments relate to the roof, the renovation of elementary schools, a bus loop project and a new operations centre.

“Investing in our students and our program is Parkland’s core mission,” Superintendent Mark Madson said in a statement. “We balance this with investments in district facilities to maintain an environment conducive to learning and to protect district facilities, which are taxpayer assets.”

School districts are still waiting to find out what funding they will receive from the state. Governor Tom Wolf’s budget must be passed by the Legislative Assembly by June 30.

Morning Call reporter Jenny Roberts can be reached at 484-903-1732 and jroberts@mcall.com.

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NSW budget: winners and losers https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/nsw-budget-winners-and-losers/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 02:07:23 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/nsw-budget-winners-and-losers/ Rural and remote health workersGPs, nurses, midwives and other healthcare workers could earn an extra $10,000 a year, provided they step into critical and ‘hard-to-fill’ (read: remote) roles. The sweetener will come on top of other relocation costs to incentivize health workers to help regional facilities in need of professionals. Health care workers across the […]]]>

Rural and remote health workers
GPs, nurses, midwives and other healthcare workers could earn an extra $10,000 a year, provided they step into critical and ‘hard-to-fill’ (read: remote) roles. The sweetener will come on top of other relocation costs to incentivize health workers to help regional facilities in need of professionals. Health care workers across the state also landed a $3,000 “thank you” payment for their service during the pandemic.

Lone parents, key workers and vulnerable older people
The government wants to help 3,000 frontline workers enter the housing market and will pilot a $740 million capital equity program over two years. You probably remember a similar idea developed by the Albanian government. NSW will take advantage of this and contribute up to 40% for new property or up to 30% for existing property under $950,000 in Sydney and other major regional centres.

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First Nations Communities
Health, justice, housing and land rights strategies for First Nations people will receive $716 million over four years to strengthen Closing the Gap goals and other outcomes. It will include nearly $150 million for 200 new homes and 260 modernized homes. An additional $25 million has also been committed to permanently placing the Aboriginal flag on the Sydney Harbor Bridge. There will also be $900,000 for a dedicated repatriation of ancestral remains, led by the Australian Museum titled “Returning Them Home”.

Police, SES, RFS and National Parks
State police forces will receive $5.5 billion, including more than $430 million for new and upgraded stations and facilities. Following the Northern Rivers flood disaster, the state’s emergency service will receive its biggest boost of more than $132 million for infrastructure, resources and personnel. Lismore will also have its own incident control center. For the Rural Fire Service, there will be $191 million over four years, while National Parks and Wildlife Service firefighters will receive $598 million for things like improving radio networks and protecting important habitat, like the famous Wollemi pines.

The buses
More than $218 million has been invested in the state’s bus fleet to go green and support the shift to zero-emissions technology. The 8,000+ bus transition plan is expected to reduce Transport for NSW emissions by 78%. (So ​​it’s not quite “zero” emissions, but it’s getting close.)

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Drivers
If you tend to exercise with your e-tag most of the time, this one’s for you. Drivers who spend more than $1,400 on tolls a year will save up to $750 a year under a two-year, $520 million program to subsidize road toll users. The plan will replace the enrollment relief program from next year.

queens of culture
The state’s arts and culture sector has felt the pandemic and its closures particularly hard. To help revitalize the struggling sector, the government will provide $5.9 million for free admission to the Australian Museum and Sydney Living Museums for next year. It’s time to get your culture going, folks.

losers

Foreign investors
Wealthy foreign investors looking for a humble abode in the port city will see the property tax on residential property rise by 2-4%. The move was particularly unpopular with the Property Council of Australia, who described it as a tax on new developments and “a handbrake on new homes”. But it’s sorry-not-sorry from the government, which says the tax hike will raise $300million to help pay for healthcare services enjoyed by NSW residents.

NSW budget (at least in the short term)
Tinkering with stamp duty will mean giving up a serious source of government revenue. It set aside about $728 million over four years to offset some of the losses, which exceeds the $660 million projected in the budget documents. Stamp duty payments jumped by more than $5 billion during the pandemic. Over the past 20 years, the median house price in Sydney has fallen from $418,000 to around $1.59 million. The cost of stamp duty on this median-priced home jumped 406%, from around $14,300 to nearly $72,400.

Public sector workers
The government says this is a win for workers: a pay rise bringing the wage cap to 3% this year and a possible 3.5% next year. Unfortunately, that’s not quite what workers had in mind, sitting well below inflation (5.1%) and not keeping pace with the rising cost of living. It follows an ongoing strike by teachers, nurses and paramedics. The peak body for unions says more is to come.

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Inhabitants of the northern beaches
The government will delay several of its large-scale mega-projects, including the Beaches Link. It’s all thanks to advice from its independent infrastructure body to divert spending to less risky, smaller projects with “high returns and faster paybacks.” Too bad for those Balgowlah bourgeois who are living in limbo in homes slated for demolition amid plans for the seven-kilometre stretch of road, on ice for now.

Residents of South Sydney
The second leg of the M6 ​​motorway, linking Kogarah with Sydney’s southern suburbs, is also on the back burner for now. The first stage should open at the end of 2025.

Gambling
The government will close a tax loophole in the betting laws to align the tax rates for online and on-track betting, raising them both to 15%. The reform is expected to bring in $740 million over four years, but the government will also compensate industry to support the transition.

Social housing
The government will commit $300 million to modernize 15,800 social housing units. But with 50,000 people on the social housing waiting list, sector advocates will be disappointed to see there isn’t more for the new housing stock. However, there will be 120 new social homes for the homeless under the Together Home Transition program.

Our latest news alert will be notify you important breaking news as it happens. Get it here.

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North Carolina Schools Are Spending Big Money To Fight Learning Loss :: WRAL.com https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/north-carolina-schools-are-spending-big-money-to-fight-learning-loss-wral-com/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 09:30:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/north-carolina-schools-are-spending-big-money-to-fight-learning-loss-wral-com/ By Emily Walkenhorst, WRAL Education Journalist Raleigh, North Carolina — The best way to help Lynn Pacos teach her first graders to be proficient readers: “Personal, personal, personal. “We need this full time [teaching assistant] in my room, there’s no doubt about it,” Pacos said during a visit to his classroom at Wildwood Forest Primary […]]]>

— The best way to help Lynn Pacos teach her first graders to be proficient readers: “Personal, personal, personal.

“We need this full time [teaching assistant] in my room, there’s no doubt about it,” Pacos said during a visit to his classroom at Wildwood Forest Primary School.

She does not have any. North Carolina cut funding for thousands of them years ago. And she needs it more than ever.

Students across the state have struggled over the past two years. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused school closures that have lasted a year or more for some students, forcing many to try to navigate virtual learning, sometimes in the absence of working parents. Some students with developmental delays weren’t able to get the same level of attention they might have received in person.

Many North Carolina students are several months behind in English language arts and many are nearly a full school year behind in math, according to state testing data through spring 2021. Many students , although far fewer in number than average, are still tested at grade level or above in the spring.

That’s where people like Rachael Poirier come in. Poirier is a reading tutor assigned to Pacos’ class. She is crucial in helping Pacos students who need reading intervention. “We obviously do a lot of reading, a lot of rehearsals,” Poirier said. “And we also write a lot. And they do [phonics] tests every week.

She is part of the army of tutors, learning coaches and behavioral health specialists who have been hired or contracted by local school systems to help with learning recovery. Schools organize learning programs before school, after school and during the summer.

Systems are stepping up to test student progress through the school year. They are placing more students in their “tiered support systems” which are designed to determine the level of intervention students need, including disability services, according to a WRAL News review of plan applications. stimulus packages for 31 school systems in central and eastern North Carolina.

Together, the school systems have committed $356.1 million to this effort. That includes $43.1 million from the Wake County public school system set aside to recruit people like Poirer.

‘High dose tutoring’

This year’s first graders, at a critical age to learn to read, had never attended a full school year in a physical classroom until this year, even though they were attending kindergarten. This harms students academically and socially, and it’s often difficult for teachers to find time to focus on this latter struggle, Pacos says.

Poirier helps students who need more individual attention, while Pacos can stay focused on the rest of his class. It’s part of a research-based “high-dose tutoring” model that requires frequent sessions with only one to three students at a time. That’s the model used by the North Carolina Education Corps, which employs Poirier and about 200 other tutors in two dozen school districts.

First-graders at Pacos need small group work to become better readers. “They come at so many different levels that it’s very difficult to do group lessons with the kids,” she said.

Students have long had differences in their classroom progress and have always needed individualized approaches to their learning.

“That’s one of the things that makes teaching difficult,” said Kathleen A. Dawson, assistant superintendent of schools for Orange County. But the disparities between students have widened due to the interruptions caused by the pandemic.

“And although things are improving, we still face many challenges,” Dawson said. Staffing remains a challenge, as well as absences related to COVID. “Once we get over those hurdles,” she said, “we can do better.”

High-dose tutoring appears to have made a difference for some students in Granville County schools, said Lauren Piper, district literacy coordinator. Last year, four North Carolina Education Corps tutors worked with 87 students in the district. Tutors have helped about one-fifth of those students reach proficiency level and more than three-fifths achieve average or above growth in reading skills, including Piper’s own son, Brayden, who is entering second grade.

Before tutoring, Brayden could only read six words per minute, and none of them were accurate. By the end of the school year, he could read 22 words per minute, with 94% accuracy. The expectation at the school level is 25 words per minute.

“My heart is exploding with this feeling of righteous gratitude that he’s been able to accomplish so much growth in this amount of time,” Piper said. Brayden is confident now, picking up books from shelves and trying to read them. “And he hasn’t before,” she said. “He didn’t want anything to do with a book before.”

Schools track what works and what doesn’t for learning recovery; they are required to assess the impact of how they have used their stimulus funds. Research can provide a guide to what schools should explore. For example, some research suggests that high-dose tutoring is effective, but is not as clear on other types of tutoring.

Further learning recovery efforts are in sight. The 31 school districts examined by WRAL have spent more than $900 million of all their stimulus funds, with nearly $900 million more planned for programs through September 2024, much of it for school resumption. learning. They have about $389.2 million more in federal funds that they still haven’t asked to use.

There is no statewide data on how much has already been spent on learning recovery.

Growing workforce

Durham Public Schools, with the $28 million it has committed to learning resumption so far, has hired or plans to hire 212 temporary workers with its federal funding, according to a budget submission from the district. This includes 55 coaches who are exclusively dedicated to accelerating the pace of student learning – “acceleration” in educator parlance.

Acceleration is a different approach to learning recovery than more traditional remedial course methods. Remediation requires students to revisit material they are unfamiliar with and delay moving on to new material. In accelerated learning, students only go over what they absolutely need to know in order to continue learning new lessons.

“If you’re spending all your time on remediation, you’re not helping students catch up,” said Durham Public Schools spokesman Chip Sudderth. “And on top of that, you’re not meeting some of the basic needs of students.”

Student learning may be hindered by other issues. This is why the school system hires behavioral health staff and support staff for students with higher needs.

Sudderth says the district is still working to hire everyone, which other school systems say they are doing too.

They are looking for people to fill positions that have never existed before, in this quantity, in North Carolina’s education economy, amid staffing shortages and burnout.

Orange County schools have so far budgeted $3.3 million for resuming learning, including short-term staff targeting higher-needs students and students from disadvantaged areas. The school system will also conduct mid-year assessments and work on social-emotional learning and interventions for students who may need higher levels of support.

“It’s not like our students are broadly the same on every skill and standard,” said Dawson, the deputy superintendent of Orange. “There are times when they’re going to be strong in one area but weak in another and that’s true for all of us. So it’s really about identifying those areas and saying, ‘OK, that’s where we need to buttress a bit more, that’s where we need to push someone to give them higher-level opportunities.”

Not as much learning in the summer

Although the state General Assembly required school systems to offer summer learning for all grade levels during the summer of 2021, the legislature did not impose such a requirement this year.

Lawmakers continue to require summer reading camps for lower grades, and they’re now requiring a career-acceleration program this summer for sixth-graders.

Some of the school systems reviewed by WRAL News are planning another six-week summer learning program for at-risk students this year, but many are not.

The data on how it went last year was disappointing. Most pupils invited to attend summer learning camps last year – all pupils identified as “at risk” of not progressing to the next level – did not even register. Turnout was uneven, even among many who did. About 574,000 of the 157,000 invited first- through third-grade students signed up.

Most of the students who participated were not grade-tested.

Make the difference

Poirier became a tutor because she is considering a career as a teacher. She applied in July and started working as a tutor in October, after training on working with students.

Lynn Pacos and students

“I’ve seen so much growth already,” Poirier said. “It’s awesome, and I love seeing it so much.”

The teachers Poirier works with give him advice on what students need to work on and what benchmarks they want students to reach.

Some did not yet know how to read when Poirier started working with them. After intensive tutoring, they understood and can now read basic books for their grade level.

Pacos regrets what she can’t do during the school day. Students have more needs right now and teachers’ plates are full. The teaching assistants available to the school are being called upon to cover classrooms as substitute teachers more often these days.

The school purchased a social-emotional learning program that teaches children skills to listen, pay attention, control their behavior and get along with others. “I can’t access it most of the time,” Pacos said.

But Pacos says she’s happy to have someone like Poirier, as long as she’s able to help.

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Not much is happening in the education budget https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/not-much-is-happening-in-the-education-budget/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/not-much-is-happening-in-the-education-budget/ The Ministry of Education. —BDNews The budget proposal for the financial year 2023 envisages an allocation of Tk 6,780.64 billion, compared to Tk 6,036.81 billion as proposed in the 2022 financial budget which was eventually revised down to Tk 5,935 billion . The proposed spending is 15.2% of the size of gross domestic product. When […]]]>

The Ministry of Education. —BDNews

The budget proposal for the financial year 2023 envisages an allocation of Tk 6,780.64 billion, compared to Tk 6,036.81 billion as proposed in the 2022 financial budget which was eventually revised down to Tk 5,935 billion . The proposed spending is 15.2% of the size of gross domestic product. When preparing the budgets for fiscal years 2022 and 2021, the government had to take into account the Covid-19 epidemic, which may have forced the government to be somewhat conservative. The Russian-Ukrainian war, the rise in the value of the dollar and soaring prices may also have influenced the budget proposals.

The fiscal year 2022 budget allocated 11.69% of spending to education. In the FY2023 proposal, the education allocation as a percentage of expenditures reached 12.01. While the allocation for education has hovered around 12% of the national budget for several years, the proposed budget allocation for education for the next fiscal year is not hopeful and seems traditional. Although we have heard of measures to fill the void created by the Covid epidemic and ravage the education sector for two years, the allocation represents 1.83% of gross domestic product. The global standard established by UNICEF is to allocate 20% of the national budget and 6% of the gross domestic product to education, which is not yet the case in Bangladesh. In terms of education expenditure, the percentage of gross domestic product and total budget expenditure ranks Bangladesh last among South Asian countries. Even Nepal is ahead of Bangladesh in this regard.

A national budget of Tk 6.78 trillion proposed to parliament on June 9 may be a talking point given the rising prices that have constrained citizens. It is true that 118.06 billion taka more has been allocated to three ministries and divisions in charge of education compared to the allocation for the financial year 2022. The division of secondary and higher education, the division of the Madrasah and Technical Education and the Ministry of Primary and Mass Education in the proposal received an allocation of 814.5 billion taka, which was 696.4 billion taka for the outgoing financial year. The Ministry of Primary and Mass Education received an allocation of 317.61 billion taka, which was 282.22 billion taka in the outgoing budget year. The Secondary and Higher Education Division received an allocation of 399.62 billion taka compared to an allocation of 324.13 billion taka in the outgoing fiscal year. The Madrasah and Technical Education Division received an allocation of 97.27 billion taka, which is 7.18 billion taka more than the allocation for the outgoing financial year.

Students from all sorts of streams and educational institutions have been disconnected from in-person business for about two years. The government has tried to connect students to education using technology, but poverty and the unavailability of devices needed for such a connection have had no impact as online and community-based education n did not reach a greater number of students. The gap that government efforts have created and shown and efforts to address the issue through a blended learning mode were discussed. But the budget proposed the imposition of an additional 10% tax on fiber optic connection and laptop computers. This would increase the cost of the internet and the devices needed to use the internet. The approach seems contradictory.

The Minister of Finance said that the education rate at the secondary level, gender equality, general learning and training based on science and technology, allowances and scholarships for students and teachers, various measures to hone the merit of students, the construction of the structure of government and non-government educational institutions and the distribution of books are continuing as part of the government’s plan to spread education and improve its quality. He also speaks of the recruitment of 38,283 teachers through the non-governmental Teacher Registration and Certification Authority and that steps to recruit 15,163 teachers are underway. In 2021-2022, 1,200 classrooms were built. Three hundred and fifteen schools have been transformed into model schools in as many upazilas. The Education Trust Fund has 10 billion taka to help poor, destitute and deserving students. But the model schools do not seem to have an impressive impact on the quality of education.

Schools not yet covered by the monthly payment system are struggling to get the facilities and schools have started calling for nationalization. This area deserves government attention because primary and secondary schools, and even colleges, are not evenly distributed geographically based on demographics. Many public primary schools have only one or two students, and many schools have 30 to 40 students. This suggests a misuse of money in this sector. Densely populated areas have no high schools or colleges.

Areas that need schools have no schools, suggesting a poor distribution of educational facilities. This has been going on for years and needs to be remedied with proper mapping. Neither the 2023 budget proposal nor the 2022 budget suggests any improvement in this regard. Because of such a situation, many teachers feel that they have been deprived of their due. The government has done a lot for teachers. A serious shortcoming has become visible, challenging the authorities on the repair. The budget should have focused on that.

The national curriculum takes on a new form in 2023, as reported by the National Curriculum and Textbook Council. Change has been the focus of concern for several months. But the budget proposal is almost silent on this subject. It is also said that the proposals and plans set out in the Education Policy 2010 have been implemented phase by phase; but, the action does not match the request. Students in classes I, II, VI and VII would receive textbooks designed according to the new curriculum in 2023, which will certainly require a huge amount of money, but this was not mentioned in the budget proposal.

Yet, the allowance was increased from Tk 80 million to Tk 200 million for poor but deserving students. The size of the gross domestic product stands at 44.5 trillion taka, but the education sector received an allocation of less than 2% of the gross domestic product. This is not a good allocation, especially considering that the government claims to have given education the highest priority.

Masum Billah is the President of the Association of English Teachers of Bangladesh.

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LA’s unified superintendent proposes $18.5 billion budget to close learning gaps https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/las-unified-superintendent-proposes-18-5-billion-budget-to-close-learning-gaps/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 01:24:23 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/las-unified-superintendent-proposes-18-5-billion-budget-to-close-learning-gaps/ Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) Superintendent Alberto Carvalho proposes an $18.5 billion budget for the upcoming school year, with $1.9 billion in targeted investments to close school gaps . Carvalho provided the district board of education with an overview of the budget’s targeted investments on June 14, calling the budget “the heart and fuel […]]]>

Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) Superintendent Alberto Carvalho proposes an $18.5 billion budget for the upcoming school year, with $1.9 billion in targeted investments to close school gaps .

Carvalho provided the district board of education with an overview of the budget’s targeted investments on June 14, calling the budget “the heart and fuel of our school system.”

“The 2022-2023 budget addresses the district’s most pressing issues while reaffirming our long-standing commitment to providing communities across all 710 square miles with a nurturing environment,” Carvalho said in a statement.

This year’s proposed budget is approximately $4.1 billion higher than the previous year’s proposed budget of $14.7 billion, but $1.5 billion lower than the final adopted budget of $20 billion. dollars from the previous year.

To boost academic success, the proposed budget allocates $122 million for extended instructional days, such as summer programs, $100 million to support high-needs students, $100 million to support special education programs, $13 million to support early education programs, $6 million to support English language learners, and $4 million to support tutoring programs.

Additionally, the district is offering $24 million for the district’s Black Student Achievement Plan — which began this school year to address disparities between black students and their peers — and $200,000 to support other student programs. blacks and natives.

To target student “wellness,” the budget recommends $822 million for the district’s expanded learning opportunities program, $58 million to support outdoor education programs, $50 million to support social-emotional learning, wellness and mental health programs, $21 million to support arts programs. , and $10 million to support bilingual programs.

On school operations, the budget also proposes $50 million for safety and security after Carvalho last month announced plans to bolster school security operations in light of the elementary school shooting in Uvalde. , in Texas.

It comes after the board voted in 2020 to cut the school’s safety and security budget by a third following the Black Lives Matter movement.

Carvalho also offered $50 million for additional classroom technology and $5 million for parent engagement and outreach.

In addition to addressing learning gaps, Carvalho is focused on transitioning LAUSD away from COVID-19 protocols in preparation for a time when the district loses federal pandemic assistance; last year, the district received about $5 billion in pandemic relief funds from the federal government

“We remain vigilant and will ensure that we allocate recurring and non-recurring resources in the most effective and efficient way,” Carvalho said.

The district also continues to face declining enrollment.

In May, the district predicted a 30% decline in enrollment over the next decade; and because state funding is based on average attendance and enrollment, the district will likely see a decline in funding in future years.

Carvalho told the board at a meeting in May that a “perfect storm” of declining enrollment and funding will create future challenges for the district.

“Los Angeles Unified is facing an alarming convergence and acceleration of declining enrollment and the expiration of single state and federal dollars, as well as continued and growing financial liabilities,” Carvalho said, adding that there is “no easy route to funding”. stability.”

The board is expected to vote on the initial adoption of the budget on June 21, but will continue to revise the budget until it is finalized in August.

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Panetta Leadership Seminar to feature John Kelly – Monterey Herald https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/panetta-leadership-seminar-to-feature-john-kelly-monterey-herald/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 18:16:23 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/panetta-leadership-seminar-to-feature-john-kelly-monterey-herald/ SEASIDE >> Former White House Chief of Staff General John Kelly and former Secretary of Defense Mark Esper will be among the featured presenters at this year’s Panetta Institute’s annual leadership seminar. week, which brings together student leaders from many California universities. Now in its 23rd year, the seminar focuses on teaching leadership principles, strategies, […]]]>

SEASIDE >> Former White House Chief of Staff General John Kelly and former Secretary of Defense Mark Esper will be among the featured presenters at this year’s Panetta Institute’s annual leadership seminar. week, which brings together student leaders from many California universities.

Now in its 23rd year, the seminar focuses on teaching leadership principles, strategies, and practices to help students become more effective leaders and encourage them to pursue a life of public service. The class includes student body officers from the campuses of California State University and a private university.

The seminar has traditionally brought students to CSU Monterey Bay’s Panetta Institute to hear presentations from experts and leaders in a variety of fields. However, due to security concerns related to COVID-19, the seminar will be held virtually again this year.

“Our recent national student survey revealed that students are deeply concerned about the direction the country is headed,” Institute President Leon Panetta said in a press release. “They are concerned about the economy and their own financial future, but above all they are deeply frustrated with what they perceive as a lack of action and a failure to lead by those in power. This unique student program exposes these young people to leaders from many different backgrounds and experiences. The goal is for students to study from the lessons these people have learned so they can turn their frustration into action and commitment.

Among the presentations students will hear this week:

• John Kelly will speak about leadership within the executive.

• Regarding the conflict in Ukraine and the global rise of autocracy, Mark Esper will discuss leadership when democracies are under attack.

• Former National President and CEO of the NAACP, Ben Jealous, will discuss approaches to racism in American society.

• Award-winning journalists Dan Balz and Carla Marinucci will talk about journalism’s place in civic leadership.

• Mel Mason, Executive Director of The Village Project, and Regina Mason, President of the Monterey Bay Chapter of the NAACP, will speak about leadership development starting at the bottom.

• Chris Dalman, former Super Bowl champion, San Francisco 49er and current manager of the Palma school; and former Philadelphia Eagle and CEO of Boys & Girls Clubs, Ron Johnson will speak about leadership in sports.

• Former Presidential Advisor David Gergen will discuss leadership in education and politics and the importance of lifelong learning skills.

• The President of the Naval Postgraduate School, Ann Rondeau, will speak about leadership in the military.

Students will also participate in a special state budget exercise and attend sessions on cybersecurity and leadership in the justice system.

Students will be required to complete other course work, write reports, and make presentations before receiving three academic credit units and a certificate of completion issued by the Panetta Institute.

CEO and President of the Panetta Institute, Sylvia Panetta, said, “Through this program, we teach student leaders that leadership should be an essential part of their careers and their responsibilities as participants in our democracy.

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