Learning budget – Lycee Paul Claudel http://lycee-paul-claudel.com/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 23:26:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Learning budget – Lycee Paul Claudel http://lycee-paul-claudel.com/ 32 32 Student Services Finance Committee Hears ALPS and BSU Budget Proposals The Badger Herald https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/student-services-finance-committee-hears-alps-and-bsu-budget-proposals-the-badger-herald/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 22:55:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/student-services-finance-committee-hears-alps-and-bsu-budget-proposals-the-badger-herald/ The student services finance committee met on Monday to discuss budgets for the University of Wisconsin and Wisconsin Black Student Union adventure learning program. The SSFC is responsible for allocating separate fees for student services, activities, programs and facilities. Separate charges are funds charged to students in addition to tuition fees, which fund student services. […]]]>

The student services finance committee met on Monday to discuss budgets for the University of Wisconsin and Wisconsin Black Student Union adventure learning program.

The SSFC is responsible for allocating separate fees for student services, activities, programs and facilities. Separate charges are funds charged to students in addition to tuition fees, which fund student services.

UW student organization Adventure learning programs presented its draft budget for fiscal year 2023.

SSFC approves AHA’s budget and hears Wunk Sheek’s budget proposalThe student services finance committee approved the budget proposed by atheists, humanists and agnostics for fiscal year 2019-2020 and heard from Wunk Read…

ALPS offers community groups, both affiliated with the university and not, adventure-based activities that “inspire cooperation and team building skills”. ALPS has adapted its online workshops following the COVID-19 pandemic and now offers virtual team building workshops as well as ground activities at low and high ropes courses.

According to presentation by ALPS host Isabelle Johnson.

The first one to augment on their budget is the AEE Heartland Regional Conference, which was moved to a virtual format during the fiscal year 2022, but should be in person for the following year, which explains the 80% increase in funding for the event.

The second to augment is due to the addition of a marketing director position. It is important for ALPS to be able to reach a large group of people using strategic social engagement. This is best done with the addition of a marketing director, according to Johnson.

“We want to serve more students and we have the capacity to do so,” Johnson said.

Fifty years after black student strike, students still grapple with racial divideIn 1969, black students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison called a strike. Long-standing diversity issues, a lack of Read…

SSFC also heard from the Wisconsin Black Student Union about its proposed budget for fiscal year 2023. The proposed budget has remained consistent with this year’s budget.

The Union of Black Students of Wisconsin is a student organization involved in expanding and sustaining the black student body to help diversify the campus by running events and campaigns throughout the year.

BSUs events Often involve an honorary speaker and a shared dinner, totaling approximately $ 7,000 to $ 8,000. The Black History Month campaign welcomes an honorary speaker, representing $ 3,800 of its budget.

SSFC Hears UW Dreamers Presentations, Approves CWC Budget After 10% CutThe Student Services Finance Committee on Tuesday approved the Campus Women’s Center budget for fiscal year 2022 and kept the budget Read…

One of the goals of the activism campaign is to produce a documentary on the Abraham Lincoln statue on Bascom Hill, representing its budget of $ 2,300, said BSU treasurer Terjuan Short.

The SSFC has yet to vote on either budget. The next meeting will take place on Thursday 11 November.

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faculty – The GW ax https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/faculty-the-gw-ax/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 07:00:04 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/faculty-the-gw-ax/ The professors said they don’t care if GW’s next president chooses to establish a formal strategic plan, but rather hope he will focus on including their views in decision-making first. major. The University has not had a strategic plan since officials called the plan drawn up by outgoing University President Thomas LeBlanc, which the GW […]]]>

The professors said they don’t care if GW’s next president chooses to establish a formal strategic plan, but rather hope he will focus on including their views in decision-making first. major.

The University has not had a strategic plan since officials called the plan drawn up by outgoing University President Thomas LeBlanc, which the GW community said lacked shared governance, as “obsolete” last November. given the COVID-19 pandemic. Professors said they don’t think a strategic plan is currently needed and instead hope administrators will focus on pressing issues like understaffed IT and layoffs.

Now, as the university enters a “transition phase” leading to an interim presidency of up to 18 months, professors say officials should aim to resolve concerns in the GW community regarding shared governance before d ” develop a strategic plan.

“During this period, the important work of fulfilling our teaching and research mission continues,” the spokesperson for Crystal Nosal University said in an email. “After Dr. Wrighton officially joins the University on January 1, he will communicate his thoughts and plans to the GW community.”

Board chair Grace Speights told faculty in April that officials would conduct a broader assessment of shared governance policies at the university, as they are based on “constructive engagement” between faculty and faculty. responsible.

“The board has spent a lot of time over the summer thinking about the issue of shared governance and how we could move forward together – the three constituents – to make it an even better university, and I can tell you that the board of directors is committed to doing so. “Speights said at a faculty Senate meeting in September.

Speights said in September that officials were ready to open a “fresh start” in talks between the board, faculty and administration to improve shared governance.

Members of the GW community cited initiatives such as LeBlanc’s 20/30 plan – a plan to cut undergraduate enrollment by 20% while increasing the share of STEM majors to 30% – amid their calls. to Leblanc’s resignation last year. Faculty said the 20/30 plan violates principles of shared governance and could result in “major” cuts to funding for humanities departments.

As the University prepares for interim presidential leadership that could last until June 2023, officials have remained silent on when they plan to develop a strategic plan, but have also said they cannot go. moving forward with major University planning efforts, such as a fundraising campaign without a strategic plan. .

Amid officials’ silence on the state of the University’s strategic planning efforts, they also said they could not move forward with some campus-wide planning efforts without a strategic plan. , like a big fundraising campaign.

The professors said they were unsure whether a long-term strategic plan was needed and that they would prefer officials to prioritize the allocation of additional funds to research, classroom technology and academic positions. staff after officials laid off 339 staff last year as part of their efforts to mitigate the financial impact of the pandemic. They said if officials are implementing a strategic plan, they should consider feedback from the GW community and shared governance through public meetings or surveys.

Harald Griesshammer, associate professor of physics and faculty senator, said he didn’t think a new strategic plan was needed because the University should instead focus on the immediate demands of students and faculty members, such as the management of IT and staff layoffs.

“We will only have a credible community effort if at some point, [we] reign over the variety of voices you get and then create something where there was a democratic process where the people who write the writing actually speak for the community, ”he said.

Griesshammer said the University’s implementation of its next strategic plan should be a “community effort” that includes all voices on campus, including students and faculty. He said officials must determine the mission of the university through town halls and surveys.

“What we need is to understand what GW wants to stand up for and, therefore, what he wants his future to be,” he said.

Officials announced in September that Mark Wrighton, the former chancellor of Washington St. Louis University, would assume the interim presidency on January 1. The faculty said Wrighton can help mend the relationship between the GW community and the administration and strengthen shared governance. during his tenure as interim president.

Wrighton said in an interview in September that he wanted to work with faculty to create a “common understanding” of shared governance during his presidency.

“Our goal is to prepare the institution for a new president by achieving both an understanding and the implementation of that understanding,” Wrighton said.

Griesshammer said that at the start of Wrighton’s tenure next semester, the university should focus on immediate issues affecting the community, such as an understaffed IT department.

The faculty said in April that officials should allocate more money in the FY2021 budget to research after the pandemic delayed ongoing research.

Kim Roddis, professor of civil engineering and senator at the faculty, said she believes she can trust Wrighton’s experience and judgment to get the University back on track and determine whether or not GW needs a new strategic plan before the arrival of his next permanent. President.

“If he chooses to use the strategic planning process, that’s fine with me as long as he’s doing it under shared governance,” she said. “And if he chooses to do something else, that’s fine with me.”

Shaista Khilji, professor of human and organizational learning and international affairs, said that with improved shared governance, the University can implement a strategic plan that members of the GW community will commit to.

“If there is one thing we can learn from our recent experiences, it is the need to strengthen shared governance at GW – a joint effort that administrators, administration and faculty have recently undertaken,” said she said in an email.

Higher education experts have said that strategic plans can help drive a university’s mission and without one, universities are limited in how they can distribute resources.

Joseph Paris, assistant professor of higher education at Temple University, said a strategic plan can help officials align the university’s program with its mission, which can help them determine how to allocate resources, such as funding and administrative assistance, to its students and staff.

“In the absence of a strategic plan, there may be a risk of misalignment of these resources and the outcome that these resources intend to achieve,” said Paris.

Tolani Britton, assistant professor of higher education at the University of California at Berkeley, said a strategic plan can help “rectify” the policies and programs that support a university’s students and faculty.

“It might be difficult to make decisions that are in the interest and long-term vision of the institution if this vision has not been articulated through a strategic plan with concrete milestones and goals,” a- she declared.

Jennifer Lee Hoffman, associate professor of higher education and leadership policy at the University of Washington, said the pandemic may have magnified enrollment and financial challenges a university may have faced prior to the pandemic. She said the pandemic has led to “uncertainty” about the future of higher education institutions, and a strategic plan can help address those concerns.

“The problem is that the colleges, the universities that really depend on enrollment are going to have to be very careful about the decisions they make in order to maintain their financial viability,” she said. “So this is where your strategic plan is really, really important. “

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Nine seek the hot seat of CDA https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/nine-seek-the-hot-seat-of-cda/ Sat, 06 Nov 2021 08:09:24 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/nine-seek-the-hot-seat-of-cda/ The Coeur d’Alene School District Board of Directors plans to select four finalists to interview on November 15 from among nine eligible candidates for the Zone 3 administrator position. The position was declared vacant on October 4, following the resignation of former director Tambra Pickford, and the board is to appoint a person for the […]]]>


The Coeur d’Alene School District Board of Directors plans to select four finalists to interview on November 15 from among nine eligible candidates for the Zone 3 administrator position.

The position was declared vacant on October 4, following the resignation of former director Tambra Pickford, and the board is to appoint a person for the remainder of the term until December 2023 in accordance with Idaho code.

The deadline for appointing the new director is January 1, as Idaho code 33-504 says the board has 90 days after declaring the vacancy to make the appointment.

Scott Maben, director of communications, said on Friday the board would invite the nine candidates to respond in writing to additional questions next week. They will then select four finalists based on the responses and initial application letters.

The discussion to select the four finalists will take place at a public council meeting on the morning of November 15, and these four will be interviewed that evening at a public meeting. The exact time and place of the meetings will be determined.

Maben said the new administrator could be selected at the end of the talks.

The nine nominees are Nicholas Lepire, Heather Tenbrink, Jen Jeanselme, Gary Patterson, Matthew Brawner, Kevin King, Kevin Bitnoff, Jeanette Laster and Brandon Trca.

The press filed for public registration for the nine applications. Here are quick snapshots of the nine.

•••••

Nicolas lepire de Coeur d’Alene has been a Bonner County Deputy District Attorney since 2014 and previously served as a Lewiston Deputy District Attorney.

Lepire said he had grown up in Coeur d’Alene from third grade and had a wife and two children. He said he spent time in schools as a parent volunteer and volunteered in high schools as a coach and mock trial judge. This made him want to get more involved in schools.

Lepire said his three main goals as an administrator would be partnering and fostering trust with parents while implementing district policies, working to implement an equity framework and ensuring that schools continue to be safe for children.

Lepire said he recognizes that there are very strong feelings among families and parents about multiple aspects of current health issues, and he thinks it’s important to let them know their voice is being heard.

•••••

Heather tenbrink de Coeur d’Alene has lived in zone 3 with her husband and four children for 17 years, and her children are enrolled in schools in the district. She said she spent a lot of time volunteering at the school. She was also President of Skyway PTA for two years and Treasurer for three years.

Tenbrink holds a bachelor’s degree in plant science from Purdue University. She is employed part-time remotely as a tax accountant in a Meridian company. She also worked as a laboratory scientist in a research institute.

She said these experiences, including her experience tutoring at North Idaho College, teaching at church, and being involved as a parent and volunteer, have equipped her with skills that will be useful in serving the community.

Tenbrink said its three main goals are to attract and retain the right people, deliver diverse and quality programs, and prepare and plan for growth.

•••••

Jean Jeanselme has spent the last 12 years in Coeur d’Alene with her husband and three children and another on the way. The children have graduated or are currently enrolled in district schools. She works as a property manager for Chubbs Hospitality.

Over the years, Jeanselme said she and her husband have been very active in the school district, volunteering in classrooms and helping with fundraisers or athletics. She did substitute teaching.

She said she strongly believes in a combination of “old school and new school” approaches to education without having to sacrifice values ​​while finding a balance of views on either side of a problem.

Jeanselme said his three main goals are transparency in all communications with the public, demonstrating unity as board members and focusing on what is best for all students while implementing policies. .

•••••

Gary Patterson de Hayden has been living in the area since 2016 and is employed as a Health Education Specialist at Panhandle Health. He was also a biology instructor and science program support specialist for 30 years at colleges and universities across the United States, and served as a substitute teacher in the Coeur d’Alene School District.

Since he has no school-going children or grandchildren in the district, Patterson said he has the ability to listen without bias to all aspects of an issue.

Patterson said his three main goals are to seek ways to incorporate an exploration of career options into each subject, to give teachers the time and freedom to develop “outside the box” lessons such as study. cases and project-based learning and making sure everyone has a voice.

•••••

Matthew Brawner de Coeur d’Alene lived in the neighborhood from 2010 to 2015, then returned in 2019 with his wife and three children, two of whom are enrolled in schools in the district.

Brawner holds a BA in Cultural Anthropology from Western Washington University and an MA in Political Science from the University of Amsterdam. He owns an offsite restaurant in Bellingham, Wash., And said he now has the time he wants to dedicate to making his community’s education system a success.

Brawner said he wanted to help focus on the health of the administrative infrastructure that will allow the district to support its teachers and staff by giving students the opportunity to perform better more often.

For his top three goals, Brawner said he wanted to develop resources and tools to help teachers connect with students, ensure the district can provide equitable access to all students, and help the district overcome challenges. budget deficits.

•••••

Kevin king de Coeur d’Alene is the parent of two local children, and an independent electronics engineer. King said he had experience in various technological disciplines as well as in business start-up management.

King said the region is seeing an influx of people leaving other states that they believe no longer provide a healthy learning environment, and he would like to provide a learning environment focused on traditional core academics by putting the emphasis on technology, leadership, civics, the Constitution and American history.

For his three main goals, King said he wanted to focus on maintaining a learning environment free from divisive ideas, fostering a relationship of trust with parents, and welcoming parents into the process of making decisions. decision-making and provide students with practical life skills such as STEM skills.

•••••

Kevin Bitnoff de Coeur d’Alene is the parent of four daughters, three of whom are currently enrolled in the school district, and coaches her local women’s football team. He is an active member of the PTA for Skyway Elementary and a classroom volunteer.

Bitnoff said he has dedicated his professional life advising business owners on growing and scaling their businesses, managing a multi-million dollar annual budget, and supervising 85 people. He works as a consulting director for Precoa.

He said he is passionate about the Constitution and the system and processes it provides for a safe and fair education and election process.

Bitnoff said his three main goals are to secure public funding for new schools in the district, to focus on teacher compensation, faculty support, and improvement of curricula and extracurricular activities, and to maintain an environment conducive to choice for parents, students and teachers.

•••••

Jeanette Laster de Coeur d’Alene has been living in Coeur d’Alene since 2008 and is the current Executive Director of the Institute for Human Rights Education.

Laster said she has served in the district since 2009 on a parent committee, community worker position or liaison on four back-to-back superintendent task forces.

Laster said she was extremely passionate about inclusion and human rights and would strive to help the district ensure that citizens and parents feel they are receiving transparency and trust in the process. vision for innovation in learning and excellence through district programs.

As for her goals, Laster said she will ensure that the district redevelops, operates and strengthens partnerships with community stakeholders at the local and state levels. She said the district must also prioritize and continue to be inclusive, removing barriers to public education and focusing on mental well-being.

•••••

Brandon trca de Coeur d’Alene has two children in the neighborhood. He holds a bachelor’s degree in communication from the University of Northern Iowa. Trca works as a producer for Farmers Insurance in Coeur d’Alene and has said he wants to represent his community. He is applying for the position to give back and do his part as a resident.

Trca said his three main goals are to create a productive working partnership with his peers and community, helping to find a solution through a convergence of ideas and an emphasis on paying attention to the ideas of others. .

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Why you should budget your attention like money https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/why-you-should-budget-your-attention-like-money/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 13:44:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/why-you-should-budget-your-attention-like-money/ It probably seems like I’m blaming my work environment for my struggle to focus, shifting the blame for my own (lack of) discipline onto “the company”. But I am not making this up. There is ample evidence that technological advancements affect our attention span. A recent study found that the internet physically alters our brains […]]]>
It probably seems like I’m blaming my work environment for my struggle to focus, shifting the blame for my own (lack of) discipline onto “the company”. But I am not making this up. There is ample evidence that technological advancements affect our attention span. A recent study found that the internet physically alters our brains so that we have shorter attention spans and worse memory. Dr Joseph Firth, senior researcher at Western Sydney University, said The telegraph that high levels of internet use could impact brain function: “The unlimited flow of prompts and notifications from the internet encourages us to constantly maintain shared attention, which in turn may decrease our ability to maintain our focus on a single task. “The study also found that smartphones are replacing our ability to memorize facts. You probably know what it feels like to subconsciously reach for your phone, or google something you don’t quite remember, or the excitable “ping” in your head when you open a tab for Twitter. There have always been things in the office to distract us (the stimulating conversation around the water cooler, perhaps) but with the internet it’s a lot easier to be distracted surreptitiously, to slip in and out of our workflow without even noticing it.
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Moore Library faculty responds to recent library budget cuts – The Rider News https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/moore-library-faculty-responds-to-recent-library-budget-cuts-the-rider-news/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 04:15:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/moore-library-faculty-responds-to-recent-library-budget-cuts-the-rider-news/ By Moore Library Faculty This fiscal year (FY22), the university administration guillotined the Moore Library material budget by cutting 30%, or $ 300,000. This reduction seriously compromises its ability to support Rider University’s pedagogy and growing curriculum. Last year (FY21) the Moore Library budget was cut by 20%. Instead of a culture of collection development, […]]]>

By Moore Library Faculty

This fiscal year (FY22), the university administration guillotined the Moore Library material budget by cutting 30%, or $ 300,000. This reduction seriously compromises its ability to support Rider University’s pedagogy and growing curriculum. Last year (FY21) the Moore Library budget was cut by 20%. Instead of a culture of collection development, we have long suffered from a culture of budget cuts at the expense of teaching and learning at Rider University.

Any further cuts will cripple teaching and learning for students. We can no longer afford this road – the cost of the entry ban is too high.

The literature shows that student success and retention correlates with higher library spending and use of library resources (citations are available, but full-text access to the majority of them will disappear with the cuts). Instead of an arbitrary budget cut, Moore Library needs a thoughtful and substantial budget increase to meet the growing needs of current and proposed / planned programs.

When the Moore Library budget faces such drastic cuts, it will affect all university departments and programs. Without adequate funding from our core academic resources, the university fails to meet the educational goals of its vision statement, to adequately support the Information Literacy (v.) Part of the skills and objectives of undergraduate student learning (outcomes) (Article 89, Academic Policy Manual) and to meet Criterion 5b. Middle States Standard III, where accredited institutions offer “a program designed for students to acquire and demonstrate essential skills, including … information literacy.” With an abominably starved material budget, we become a university library in name only. Even the most accomplished educators cannot overcome the lack of resources. In an age of widespread and deliberate disinformation, we need more easily accessible authoritative sources, not less. A sturdy bookcase at Rider is essential!

– Faculty of Moore Library

Originally printed in the 03/11/21 issue.

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School day could be extended as Conservative minister promises to “look at examples” https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/school-day-could-be-extended-as-conservative-minister-promises-to-look-at-examples/ Mon, 01 Nov 2021 18:50:02 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/school-day-could-be-extended-as-conservative-minister-promises-to-look-at-examples/ Labor criticized new Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi for failing to support children with new skills, targeted learning support and new activities instead of ‘extended hours’ ( Image: Getty Images) School days could be extended to help children catch up on learning lost due to the Covid pandemic. Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi told MPs he would […]]]>

Labor criticized new Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi for failing to support children with new skills, targeted learning support and new activities instead of ‘extended hours’

School days could be extended to help children catch up on learning lost due to the Covid pandemic.

Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi told MPs he would look at some “great examples” of longer days.

Conservative MP Robert Halfon, who chairs the special education committee, has suggested that an extension of the school day would increase educational attainment.

As recently as last week, Rishi Sunak said the government had “maximized” catch-up funding for schools.

In the budget, the Chancellor pledged an additional £ 2bn for the resumption of education after COVID, bringing COVID catch-up spending since 2019 to nearly £ 5bn, rejecting calls for more money for help children catch up on learning.

Labor criticized the Tories for “patrolling” and failing to give children a safe recovery plan.

Mr Halfon told the House of Commons: “We know, thanks to the Education Policy Institute, that it increases the level of education by two to three months, especially among disadvantaged students.








Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi wants to make disadvantaged students a priority
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Picture:

Tayfun Salci / ZUMA Press Wire / REX / Shutterstock)



“We know that a longer school day, according to the culture, media, sports department, increases the calculation by 29%. So that increases the level of education.

“Will he at least consider pilot projects in disadvantaged areas of the country where we can have a longer school day? “

Mr Zahawi replied: ‘I think the priority should be for children and students, who have the least amount of time available to them to recover, which is why the £ 800million for the extra 16-19 40 hours of education is so important.

“Plus £ 1bn for secondary and primary, making a total of £ 5bn in salvage money.

“There are great examples … of a longer school day that I’m going to look at.

“The average school day is now 6.5 hours and I would like everyone to come close to that average.”







Shadow Education Secretary Kate Green told Zahawi to “take control”



Shadow Education Secretary Kate Green said: “The kids have already had 115 days of school, missing out on learning and spending time with their friends. The Conservatives’ response is a flip-flop. face, difficulties and inability to act.

“Labor believes that students should have more time in school for breakfast clubs, targeted learning support and new activities for each child as part of our recovery plan.

“We believe the best way to support children’s recovery is to spend time with friends and teachers to learn new skills, not just extended hours in the classroom.

“The Education Secretary has had ample time to consider the matter, but is still not listening to calls from teachers, parents and education experts for a clear and comprehensive stimulus package. Zahawi must take back control. . ”

Ahead of the budget, Mr. Sunak told Times Radio, “After looking at everything, it’s pretty clear that the two things that make the biggest difference in children’s learning are tutoring in small groups and making sure that teachers have all the development, training and support they need. must be absolutely awesome.

“We’re pretty much maxed out on these things. Because there is a constraint on the quantity that can be reasonably delivered. “








Chancellor Rishi Sunak presented his 2021 budget last week
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Picture:

Ian Vogler / Daily Mirror)



Paul Whiteman, general secretary of the NAHT school leaders union, said in a statement: “The gains that could be made by lengthening the school day must be weighed against the costs of such a strategy, including impact on student mental health, reduced family time and less time for extracurricular activities.

“The happiness and well-being of children must be a priority as well as their education.”

Former Children’s Commissioner Anne Longfield had supported longer school days as she warned that one in six children may never be able to make up school time without the right support.

Earlier this year, then government Education Restoration Commissioner Sir Kevan Collins said schools could take years to recover from the impact of the pandemic.


Read more




Read more



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Everyone has a story: learning new tricks after 30 years https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/everyone-has-a-story-learning-new-tricks-after-30-years/ Sun, 31 Oct 2021 13:08:06 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/everyone-has-a-story-learning-new-tricks-after-30-years/ I visited this grassy place a few times on Saturday and Sunday. Sunday night, as the fair drew to a close and I got ready for the long drive back to Woodland, I wanted to try the clubs one last time. It was easy to find a set to borrow. Just as I was flying […]]]>

I visited this grassy place a few times on Saturday and Sunday. Sunday night, as the fair drew to a close and I got ready for the long drive back to Woodland, I wanted to try the clubs one last time. It was easy to find a set to borrow.

Just as I was flying the clubs, in my peripheral vision, I noticed one of The Flying Karamazov brothers taking a night walk with a woman, along a path that would pass right in front of me. For no logical reason, it made me extremely nervous. However, I decided to keep juggling – and I did, but my nervousness was all over the place.

Just as he and his lady were about to pass me, he turned to me and said, “Remember to breathe!

As fun as I got, I never went back to the Oregon Country Fair and never had juggling clubs in my hands again. I’m still amazed that the two most asked questions on my performance days got resolved on the same weekend – and that turned the Karamazov brothers question upside down, as one of the brothers saw me juggle and even commented on my shape.

Self-help books have always promoted the importance of breathing properly. To all of you, especially my baby boomer colleagues, I say, “Remember to breathe.


Everyone Has a Story accepts non-fiction contributions, 1,000 words maximum, and relevant photographs. Email: neighbors@columbian.com or PO Box 180, Vancouver WA, 98666. Call “Everybody Has an Editor” Scott Hewitt, 360-735-4525, with any questions.

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A solid basic education for every child https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/a-solid-basic-education-for-every-child/ Sat, 30 Oct 2021 10:38:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/a-solid-basic-education-for-every-child/ North Carolina was once a leader in public education, especially in the Southeast. Sadly, we are no longer leaders but seem content to be poor in most areas and downright poor in others. We are not doing enough to serve our students and provide them with a solid basic education as required by our state […]]]>

North Carolina was once a leader in public education, especially in the Southeast. Sadly, we are no longer leaders but seem content to be poor in most areas and downright poor in others. We are not doing enough to serve our students and provide them with a solid basic education as required by our state constitution.

The good news is that the necessary resources are at our disposal and we have a roadmap of where to make these long overdue investments in Leandro’s overall remediation plan. The Leandro Plan is the product of a court case that spanned decades because some families believed the state was underfunding education. Article 1, Section 15 of the North Carolina Constitution states: “The people have the right to the privilege of education, and it is the duty of the state to protect and maintain this right. “

As lawmakers, it is our duty to escalate and make this right meaningful to students at all schools in North Carolina.

We need to invest in kindergarten and provide high quality education for children before they enter kindergarten. The youngest children in our state must be invested sooner and more fully. This means better training and better remuneration for staff and early childhood educators. Pre-K should be available for all four-year-olds in our state. North Carolina has a history of smart, early-stage investments like this with programs like Smart Start. We can do it again.

There cannot be a strong, world-class public school system in North Carolina without well-funded educators and staff. This means that teachers are well paid for the difficult tasks they perform, particularly difficult in the past two years. They at least deserve increases. And school support staff like cafeteria workers and bus drivers should be brought in at $ 15 an hour in districts where their fares are lower. We can’t expect to attract new employees or retain the best when they feel underpaid and unappreciated.

We must also invest in improving the infrastructure of our schools. It takes a concerted effort to build better schools across North Carolina, but especially in zip codes that have been left behind far too often. The median income of a region should not determine the quality of education provided to the children who live there. Children all over the state deserve to go to school in a building where they can feel comfortable learning. The temperature outside should not affect the quality of education inside the classroom, but too many of our schools are behind schedule and require investment today.

By implementing the roadmap provided to us in the Leandro Plan, we can get North Carolina schools back on track. As the budget negotiations draw to a close, fully funding the Leandro Plan must be a priority. The future of education in North Carolina may be bright, but it will not happen without a deliberate investment in the children, schools and educators of that state.

This is why I am one of the main sponsors of HB 946 – A solid basic education for every child, part of which is envisaged in the state budget proposal. The bill can be viewed at: https://www.ncleg.gov/BillLookUp/2021/hb%20946

Representative Raymond E. Smith Jr. serves the 21st House District in the state of North Carolina. His district includes a large part of Sampson and Wayne counties. He is currently serving his second term on the North Carolina General Assembly.

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Eye-catching post sparks discussion of racism, diversity and inclusiveness at UH Mānoa https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/eye-catching-post-sparks-discussion-of-racism-diversity-and-inclusiveness-at-uh-manoa/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 21:53:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/eye-catching-post-sparks-discussion-of-racism-diversity-and-inclusiveness-at-uh-manoa/ Last summer, the Black Lives Matter movement sparked national debate and internal thinking among businesses, governments and other institutions. The same was true for the academic departments of the University of Hawai’i system. “Why has the University of Hawaii Department of Art ignored a conversation that is on the main stage of the global art […]]]>

Last summer, the Black Lives Matter movement sparked national debate and internal thinking among businesses, governments and other institutions. The same was true for the academic departments of the University of Hawai’i system.

“Why has the University of Hawaii Department of Art ignored a conversation that is on the main stage of the global art dialogue?” “

This is the question posed by a newspaper published on the occasion of Indigenous Peoples Day on October 11. “Decolonize” is in large print, with text and graphics outlining avenues for change in the art department.

“I just didn’t expect it to have such a broad impact, especially on the student body, across all disciplines, that it has had,” said Rebecca Goldschmidt, 2020 MFA graduate.

Goldschmidt is one of the organizers of the journal, which began last year with a letter from 25 recent graduates of the art department.

“Decolonize”

“Decolonize”

“We have had alumni contact us just to say, ‘I’m sorry that hasn’t changed. “Someone from a class in the 80s said, ‘This is the same thing we were working on back then!’ Says Goldschmidt.

Goldschmidt says organizers want the art department to address a number of issues. Among them, obtaining a faculty that is not predominantly white and western, actively seeking diversity and inclusiveness, fostering culture and gender sensitivity, facilitating interdisciplinary work within the UH system, and engaging more deeply with the community at large.

They also want to see clear processes for resolving issues.

“One of the benefits of this conversation is that it gave us a starting point,” said Chinese art historian Kate Lingley, chair of the art department at UH Manoa.

She agrees that faculty in the department have struggled with these and other issues.

“What concrete steps can we take to effect change now? One of the things that came out of the discussion on Friday was that we can’t change everything without learning first. So it’s happening.” , Lingley said.

There is a resolution to pursue additional anti-bias training and articulate values ​​and ideals. There is a group that is looking at anti-bias teaching methods and criticism practices, and how to extend interdisciplinary study.

A Kate Lingley UH AH.png

RHP

Kate Lingley, chair of the arts department at UH

Lingley says one of the problems stems from a lack of staff. When she joined the art department in 2004, there were over 20 faculty members. Now there are 16, plus a gallery manager, and all the blankets for the support staff that have been lost.

“The budget cuts in Mānoa and the hiring freeze over the past few years have been a bit of an obstacle to substantive change. We are very disappointed, for example, that our post in Pacific Art History remains vacant. Bringing in someone with that expertise would provide the opportunity to address some of the issues raised in the letter, ”Lingley said.

Lingley says that when professors leave a post for any reason, a new request and rationale must be made for the post before a new hire can take place.

According to Lingley, recent hires at UH have largely taken place to meet accreditation requirements. Last year, Mānoa’s budget committee suggested that the arts department stop accepting new art history graduate students.

“One of the things that distracted us last year was the Mānoa Budget Committee’s proposal to stop accepting students for a period of time into our art history graduate program. that this could be the first step in the cancellation, ”she said. noted.

Lingley stresses that small programs in universities must continually justify their existence.

“Art is so often the canary in the coal mine when universities shut down. People say, ‘What is this for?’ But since we are talking about social justice, let’s talk about access to education as a matter of social justice. . We want to maintain these programs because otherwise the only people who can study art are those who can afford to leave the island. “

The art department is facing budget cuts and possibly an existential crisis while trying to move forward. Lingley says any progress will take time.

“There are bigger issues about how the university is funded and how tuition fees are allocated, which may be more important than this conversation, but it’s possible that voices outside the ‘university speak louder,’ she told Hawai’i Public Radio. .

decolonize extract

“Decolonize”

An excerpt from “Decolonize”

A member of the art faculty examines how a facilitated discussion between critics and art department professors might work.

Simply as a work of art, the recent large format deserves to be recognized. The word “Decolonize” is in large print, with text and graphics presenting arguments in surprising and compelling ways.

Thad Higa designed the eight-page page, which is also signed by CFT, which otherwise remains anonymous.

On an inside page, in red, Higa repeated this line over and over: “I am constantly learning and unlearning my ideas about white supremacy and racism.”

“How do you feel to read this over and over again?” Higa asks.

A Rebecca Goldschmidt .png

RHP

Rebecca Goldschmidt, UH Manoa MFA, currently a doctoral student in Hiroshima, Japan.

Higa calls this the real question we all need to ask ourselves. The newspaper “Decolonize” has people talking, at least, according to Goldschmidt.

“We have seen current students say that in student accommodation they meet and meet and talk about issues. I have seen people say that students at ROTC use part of the language and refer to the newspaper. both days we get a message or two that is “hey, i just saw this, or i just saw this poster or i took the newspaper, i had no idea”, and stuff like that ” said Goldschmidt.

“And I think that’s the most powerful thing that’s been done. It has tied into some of the issues that other people are thinking about in their departments, in their disciplines. What does the university need for? make those kinds of changes? So that’s the most powerful part about it. “

You can find the newspaper “Décoloniser” online by clicking here. Submit your comments and find more resources at decolonizeuh.art

Read the full post in the box below.

We’ll also have a more in-depth discussion this week on the 11am Aloha Friday conversation on HPR-1.

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Profiles of candidates for the school committee: Gregory Thomas Renchkovsky https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/profiles-of-candidates-for-the-school-committee-gregory-thomas-renchkovsky/ Wed, 27 Oct 2021 17:54:24 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/profiles-of-candidates-for-the-school-committee-gregory-thomas-renchkovsky/ Job sought : School committee, district 1 Age: 46 Address: 16 Vista Ave Occupation: Lawyer Education: BS in Behavioral Neuroscience (Northeastern University) / JD New England Law – Boston Current civil service: Reader / Eucharistic Minister Parish of Sainte-Cécile / Coach of the Little League of North Leominster Former civil service: Management of non-profit housing […]]]>

Job sought : School committee, district 1

Age: 46

Address: 16 Vista Ave

Occupation: Lawyer

Education: BS in Behavioral Neuroscience (Northeastern University) / JD New England Law – Boston

Current civil service: Reader / Eucharistic Minister Parish of Sainte-Cécile / Coach of the Little League of North Leominster

Former civil service: Management of non-profit housing program / pro bono legal services for low income tenants and their families

Campaign website / Facebook page:https://www.facebook.com/greggrenchkovskyward1

Why would you want to serve the city better on the school committee?

First and foremost, I am the parent of two young children in the Leominster school system. I am civically engaged in the Leominster community in many different ways – as a baseball coach, lawyer, and church member. I volunteer for the common good of this community and will continue to do so. I firmly believe that the quality of our schools reflects the quality of our community and vice versa.

What are the areas in which you could contribute the most?

As a lawyer, I will bring my expertise in the negotiation and drafting of contracts. I will bring my expertise in the analysis and interpretation of the laws, regulations and ordinances in force. I will also bring the skills and ability to interpret any new legislation, laws and / or regulations as well as any mandates and guidelines issued by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education or other governing bodies.

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