Secondary education – Lycee Paul Claudel http://lycee-paul-claudel.com/ Thu, 26 May 2022 00:41:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Secondary education – Lycee Paul Claudel http://lycee-paul-claudel.com/ 32 32 Opinion: Teacher assistants are key to fair and equitable learning https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/opinion-teacher-assistants-are-key-to-fair-and-equitable-learning/ Thu, 26 May 2022 00:41:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/opinion-teacher-assistants-are-key-to-fair-and-equitable-learning/ Phil Walter/Getty Images Teacher’s aides are common in secondary schools, often assisting individual students. Anthony Edwards and Tayla Steele are Taranaki High School students and members of Taranaki Youth Voices. OPINION: Recently, it has come to our attention that students of all ages and abilities are affected by the fact that our schools are under-resourced […]]]>
Teacher's aides are common in secondary schools, often assisting individual students.

Phil Walter/Getty Images

Teacher’s aides are common in secondary schools, often assisting individual students.

Anthony Edwards and Tayla Steele are Taranaki High School students and members of Taranaki Youth Voices.

OPINION: Recently, it has come to our attention that students of all ages and abilities are affected by the fact that our schools are under-resourced for teacher assistants.

Teacher assistants are essential to the school’s education system and the government did not help by increasing teacher assistant salaries, in fact, they made the situation worse.

The problem is not with underpaid teacher assistants, the problem is with the lack of funding allocated to hiring teacher assistants.

From what we understand, the government has made schools pay more for teacher assistants, but has not increased school budgets for these changes.

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The result being that fewer teaching assistants are hired by schools, or that they divert money from another sector of education, the opposite of what was supposed to happen.

We interviewed Anna Zsigovits-Mase, a member of the leadership team at one of our secondary schools who expressed; “We have 4-5 teaching assistants, there just isn’t enough for everyone, we have almost a thousand students here… In our school, we don’t have enough funds to pay another raise for teaching assistants, not to mention hire a new one.”

However, the problem does not start or end in one school. Schools across New Zealand are suffering from the same situation.

“Other local schools I know are also under the same pressure, as well as primary schools, which have such early learning needs and need extra support. Some students will hurt others if they are not not supported.

The number of teaching assistants in our schools has a huge impact on students’ equitable right to access education.

Students of all ages have at least one classmate who has a learning disability these days and so it is unfair that these students, therefore, have fewer opportunities than their classmates.

A student who suffers from dyslexia or dyspraxia is entitled to the additional assistance of a reader-writer to support them and help them focus on their potential, this is provided by a teacher’s aide.

Teacher’s aides are there for the teacher to use in the classroom, but they tend to be assigned to a student or a group of students due to their low numbers.

An invaluable service that people often don’t have the patience or empathy for.

The vice principal was also interviewed and brought up the fact that assigning and implementing teacher assistants for everyone is difficult and requires a lot of administration, effort that shouldn’t be necessary.

“It is hard and difficult to find when a school is limited in the number of teaching assistants, to meet all the needs of the students. Schools must receive the funding and should have the right to use that funding to access teacher assistant support for each school that needs it.

Although we do not fully understand the administration of the political and financial systems involved with teacher assistants, we do know that teacher assistants, despite what their job seems to be, are invaluable in any school.

Secondary education is the time when we undergo major psychological and academic development.

The way students are supported during this crucial period of development prepares us for a lifetime.

Regardless of our backgrounds and abilities, all students deserve an education system that allows us to reach our potential.

You can help us by writing letters to our schools and MPs to point out this inequity.

Anthony Edwards and Tayla Steele are Taranaki High School students and members of Voices of Taranaki Youth.

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State Board of Education to Meet on Future of BPS – NECN https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/state-board-of-education-to-meet-on-future-of-bps-necn/ Tue, 24 May 2022 09:57:32 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/state-board-of-education-to-meet-on-future-of-bps-necn/ National education officials are due to meet on Tuesday after a scathing report found that the Boston Public School District needed “immediate improvement”. The 200-page report outlines some positives, including that over the past few years, under the leadership of outgoing superintendent Dr. Brenda Cassellius, BPS has successfully launched several new district-wide initiatives and made […]]]>

National education officials are due to meet on Tuesday after a scathing report found that the Boston Public School District needed “immediate improvement”.

The 200-page report outlines some positives, including that over the past few years, under the leadership of outgoing superintendent Dr. Brenda Cassellius, BPS has successfully launched several new district-wide initiatives and made progress others.

But the report also found that the district “has failed to effectively serve its most vulnerable students, perform core operational functions, and remove systemic barriers to delivering equitable, quality education.”

How to improve the district will be the focus of the elementary and secondary education council meeting on Tuesday morning.

The director of a family advisory board for the group, School Facts Boston, said if these issues continue to be discussed on paper and in meetings, students continue to suffer.

The DESE report states that “the district has failed to effectively serve its most vulnerable students, perform core operational functions, and remove systemic barriers to the provision of equitable, quality education.”

“Many committees, state officials and elected officials are continuing these dialogues, but the urgency and political will seem to be lacking to get these issues resolved in the most responsible and responsible way and just the right way to serve. Boston students and families as they deserve,” said Vernee Wilkinson of School Facts Boston.

While receivership is an avenue that has been touted as an option by Massachusetts education officials, the report does not directly state whether the board will recommend receivership.

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High school graduates want more diplomas | Economic news https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/high-school-graduates-want-more-diplomas-economic-news/ Sun, 22 May 2022 18:09:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/high-school-graduates-want-more-diplomas-economic-news/ Tim Grant Pittsburgh Post-Gazette A different kind of high school student is now heading to college. Graduate seniors who will be undertaking post-secondary education and training in the next few years care less about ivy-covered prestige and more about saving money, cutting costs, and keeping college debt to a bare minimum, even if it means […]]]>

Tim Grant Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

A different kind of high school student is now heading to college.

Graduate seniors who will be undertaking post-secondary education and training in the next few years care less about ivy-covered prestige and more about saving money, cutting costs, and keeping college debt to a bare minimum, even if it means living at home.

In a nationwide survey of more than 1,000 high school, junior, and sophomores, the Washington, D.C.-based College Savings Foundation found they wanted more practical, functional education options tied to an experience. real work and the ability to complete their requirements more quickly.

The two years of disrupted schooling caused by the pandemic seem to have reshaped young people’s idea of ​​what higher education looks like. Gen Z students, or “zoomers” born between 1995 and 2012, expressed the highest level of appreciation – 63% – for technical and vocational education or apprenticeship programs as a viable alternative to college. four years than ever before.

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“This year’s survey reflects greater maturity, real growth among young people and their vision of the role of post-secondary education,” said Vivian Tsai, President of the College Savings Foundation.

This survey marks the 13th annual national study of high school students’ attitudes toward saving, selecting, and paying for a college education.

Tsai said survey results from 2019 and 2020 indicated that high school students viewed college as the next chronological step in their growth. They looked forward to independence from their parents, moving into their dorms, experiencing a new phase of life, and having fun with a whole new group of friends.

“The reality of 2020, 2021 and now 2022 has indicated that this vision of college is a bit outdated at this point, because the reality is that college is a four-year preparation for real life,” Tsai said. .

“I think a lot of our kids have seen that real life is a lot harder today than it was five years ago.”

Keeping higher education costs low was a consistent theme in this year’s survey of the college planning landscape.

Cost-cutting measures chosen by high school students included attending a public college (38%); and community college (27%). In an interesting comparison, technical and vocational education and private colleges are ranked equally among higher education destinations, with 10% of secondary school students planning to go to technical and vocational schools, only slightly behind 12% in private colleges.

Other key findings from the survey were that 82% of high school students plan to work full-time or part-time while in college to help cover costs; 59% are saving for their higher education and 22% of them have saved more than $5,000; 54% plan to pay for part or all of their higher education; and 66% plan to live at home.

Financial aid expert Mark Kantrowitz said students coming out of high school are taking a more serious approach to whether they will attend four-year college, which one, what they will study and how they will pay for it.

The days of students spending two or three years in college without even declaring a major are about to disappear.

“Families have become increasingly price-sensitive and increasingly sensitive to whether college is worth it,” Kantrowitz said.

“Students are increasingly trying to avoid having to borrow, or borrowing too much,” he said. “They are looking to see if the employer offers a student loan repayment assistance program. They assess how easy it will be to repay student loans.

A rule of thumb he proposed was that if a student’s total debt upon graduation is less than their starting salary, they should be able to pay off the student debt in 10 years or less.

The rising cost of a college education has driven up the amount of debt students have taken on to afford it.

Student borrowers in the United States owe a total of $1.75 trillion as of December 31, 2021, according to the Federal Reserve Bank.

The average outstanding student debt for federal student loans — not private student loans — is about $37,000 per borrower, according to the US Department of Education.

High school students in the CSF study – 21% – said their families used 529 college savings plans to fund their higher education.

A 529 is a tax-advantaged savings plan that was created by Congress to help families pay for college expenses. Unlike custodial accounts, which are taxable based on income and capital gains, funds used for eligible educational expenses grow free of federal tax under a 529 plan, allowing for use more of a family’s savings for tuition and less for taxes.

529 plans can be used to pay for technical, vocational, and vocational training, as well as tuition and room and board, at four-year colleges. Funds can be used to pay for books or supplies needed for classes.

Technical schools and vocational and vocational training programs are gaining popularity due to their many advantages, including a shorter time to complete studies and a lower cost. But it’s not for everyone.

“Not all children have the technical skills that lead to an interest in a career at technical or vocational school,” Tsai said. “The traditional four-year college where you can take courses in history and creative writing will still have a purpose.”

The College Savings Foundation is a trade group of 529 plan program managers, state sponsors and financial services companies that service the accounts. The non-profit organization reports that there are 15.8 million 529 individual plan accounts in the United States with a total of $457.7 billion in assets that families have set aside for spending. higher education futures as of March 31, 2022, according to ISS Market Intelligence.

Every state in the country has at least one 529 plan. Some states offer more than one. Currently, 93 schemes operate out of 529 schemes across the country.

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52 caught cheating on SSC exams https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/52-caught-cheating-on-ssc-exams/ Fri, 20 May 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/52-caught-cheating-on-ssc-exams/ Karachi Secondary Education Board (BSEK) vigilante teams on Thursday caught 52 students using unfair means to solve their papers at different examination centers during the 2022 Annual Secondary School Certificate (SSC) examinations. Vigilance teams caught seven candidates cheating at Ibrahim Ali Bhai Government Secondary School in Orangi Town, four students at Matchless Government Secondary School […]]]>

Karachi Secondary Education Board (BSEK) vigilante teams on Thursday caught 52 students using unfair means to solve their papers at different examination centers during the 2022 Annual Secondary School Certificate (SSC) examinations.

Vigilance teams caught seven candidates cheating at Ibrahim Ali Bhai Government Secondary School in Orangi Town, four students at Matchless Government Secondary School in Orangi Town, 13 at Harmain Grammar Secondary School and one at Rakhshanda Public School in Orangi Town, according to a released statement. by the council.

Acting BSEK Comptroller Exam Imran Tariq and other officers caught two candidates cheating at Government Boys Secondary School Jahangir Road, one at Government Boys Secondary School Clayton Road and one at Hussaini Government Boys Secondary School in Nazimabad.

Vigilance teams also caught eight candidates cheating at Shumaila Public School in Landhi, three at Government Boys Clayton Road Secondary School, one at Baldia Government Boys Secondary School, one at Government Boys, two at Government Boys School No 2 Landhi and five at Shah. Faisal Colony Secondary School.

The cases of all these candidates had been reported to the complaints unit of the BSEK. According to BSEK chairman, Syed Sharaf Ali Shah, the council could ban these students from taking exams for a year. He asked the superintendents of the center to carry out their duties efficiently so that the board can conduct transparent reviews.

The president said vigilance teams visit exam centers daily to discourage the culture of copying in exams. The annual SSC exams were held at 445 exam centers, with 365,000 exam takers.

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Kellam High School parking issue irritates neighbors https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/kellam-high-school-parking-issue-irritates-neighbors/ Tue, 17 May 2022 22:22:50 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/kellam-high-school-parking-issue-irritates-neighbors/ VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (WAVY) – There is a parking battle brewing at West Neck Commons in Virginia Beach. Kellam High School students use the area in front of the school as a parking lot. All students park legally on public roads, but neighbors still think it’s wrong. Residents believe Kellam High School and the Virginia […]]]>

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (WAVY) – There is a parking battle brewing at West Neck Commons in Virginia Beach. Kellam High School students use the area in front of the school as a parking lot.

All students park legally on public roads, but neighbors still think it’s wrong.

Residents believe Kellam High School and the Virginia Beach School Board need to do something about it.

Resident Ashley Hayes blames Kellam High School and the Virginia Beach Public School Board,

“People look and say, why are there so many cars here? Why doesn’t the school take responsibility for these cars? They are their students,” Hayes said.

10 On Your Side drove through the Kellam High School parking lot on Tuesday morning and counted at least 50 empty parking spaces. The school system has indicated that about 600 places are reserved for eligible juniors and seniors.

So second year Tessa Scheminant parks across the street. We asked her if she should be able to park on the school grounds.

“Yes, 100%. If I could get a permit, I would park in high school, of course…Even if it cost $45,” she said.

10 On Your Side called Virginia Beach City Public Schools and received an email response stating “there would be no comment on the public parking issue.” Neighbors say that’s what caused the problem.

On the Kellam High School website it says “Kellam High School parking stickers/passes for 2021-2022 are SOLD OUT! …Students without a pass/decal are not permitted to park on Kellam HS property.

So some students legally park across the street at West Neck Commons.

There is a runoff. Hayes is trying to sell his house and all the traffic on the street during school hours doesn’t help move the house on the market.

“A person pulled up in the driveway and said, ‘We don’t want to live in a neighborhood where we have to deal with these cars,'” Hayes said.

The West Neck Commons Homeowners Association has voted not to put up signs that read ‘No Parking 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. [on] school days. Towing required.

During the school day, towing is enforced, but this applies to everyone, including owners.

Neighbor Chris Roberts, who is vice president of the homeowners association, explains why they voted no.

“I have two children who drive. I have three or four cars and I can’t even park on the street during school hours… We have to park there with our cars,” he said.

10 On Your Side asked if requiring a permit for on-street parking during school hours would be a helpful option

Roberts replied

“We didn’t have that option. The city said we couldn’t do this,” Roberts said.

10 On Your Side will continue to follow this story and post updates on any developments.

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GBSHSE SSC, HSSC Term 1 results reported; Here is the direct link https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/gbshse-ssc-hssc-term-1-results-reported-here-is-the-direct-link/ Mon, 16 May 2022 05:24:00 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/gbshse-ssc-hssc-term-1-results-reported-here-is-the-direct-link/ Goa Board Class 10th and 12th Results 2022 have been announced by the Goa Board of Secondary and Higher Secondary Education (GBSHSE) today, 16th May 2022. All students who have taken the exam can download their Goa Board SSC results and HSSC by visit official website – gbshse.info. The results have been announced for the […]]]>

Goa Board Class 10th and 12th Results 2022 have been announced by the Goa Board of Secondary and Higher Secondary Education (GBSHSE) today, 16th May 2022. All students who have taken the exam can download their Goa Board SSC results and HSSC by visit official website – gbshse.info. The results have been announced for the 10th and 12th term 1 class exams which took place from December 2021 to January 2022.

Applicants should be aware that they can download the GBSHSE 10 and 12 score sheet for the first semester exams. Currently Goa Board Term 2 exams are ongoing. Candidates can upload the results of SSC and HSSC results through the Institute login. For the convenience of students, we have mentioned the step by step process and also provided a direct link to download the result.

2022 GBSHSE Results | Here is how to download SSC, HSSC results

  • Step 1: Applicants should go to the official website of Goa Board of Secondary and Higher Secondary Education (gbshse.info) to download Goa Board results.
  • Step 2: Next, on the homepage, click on the link that says: “SSC, HSC Marks 2022 for Term 1 exams can now be download”.
  • Step 3: Applicants can also use the direct link provided here to verify – GBSHSE 2022 Goa Board Results
  • Step 4: Next, enter your login details as requested.
  • Step 5: Goa Board 2022 result for HSSC Term 1 exam will appear on the screen.
  • Step 6: Download and print results for future reference.

Goa Council SSC Result 2022 | Goa HSC Council Result 2022

Students can also check Goa Class 12 Result 2022 via SMS. Students should note that they will need their seat number to check the Goa Board HSSC 2022 Result. Follow the steps below to upload the Class 12 result.

  • GOA12SEAT NUMBER – Send it to 56263
  • GOA12SEAT NUMBER – Send to 58888
  • GOA12SEAT NUMBER – Send to 5676750
  • GB12SEAT NUMBER – Send it to 54242

(Image: PTI/Representative)

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Opinion: Post-secondary investment helps keep young people in Alberta https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/opinion-post-secondary-investment-helps-keep-young-people-in-alberta/ Sat, 14 May 2022 12:05:14 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/opinion-post-secondary-investment-helps-keep-young-people-in-alberta/ Breadcrumb Links Columnists A student studies in the Student Union building at the University of Alberta, Edmonton. File photo. Photo by Bloom, David /Postmedia Content of the article As is often said, demographics are fate — and they shape a bright future for Alberta. Advertisement 2 This ad has not loaded yet, but your article […]]]>

Content of the article

As is often said, demographics are fate — and they shape a bright future for Alberta.

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According to Statistics Canada, Alberta has the youngest population in Canada. Enrollment data from Alberta Education shows that the number of high school graduates will increase by more than 20% over the next five years. Among the many advantages that Alberta enjoys, nothing is more important than its young and growing population.

But only if we can keep them here.

The number of young Albertans choosing to leave the province to pursue post-secondary education elsewhere in Canada is of great concern, with a net outflow of nearly 6,000 students each year. This number is much higher than in any other province. Once gone, how many of these talented students will return to Alberta upon graduation?

Since taking on the role of President of the University of Alberta, my advocacy efforts with the province have focused on enrollment growth. To ensure talented young Albertans make this province their first choice for education, the University of Alberta has set an ambitious goal to increase our enrollment by more than 25% over the next five years. .

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Investing in the education of a growing young population yields enormous economic benefits: a growing and highly skilled workforce, growing demand for goods and services, and a growing tax base.

Over the next decade, two-thirds of Canadian jobs will require post-secondary education. In Alberta, projections to 2028 show that there will be a labor shortage of 1,700 to 3,750 university graduates each year.

To make the most of this opportunity, the Government of Alberta has made a significant new investment in Budget 2022 – $171 million over the next three years to increase post-secondary enrollment in high-demand programs. This week, the government announced specific details on investments for enrollment growth in post-secondary institutions across the province.

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Alberta’s largest post-secondary institution, U of A received $48 million for enrollment growth, earmarked for our globally recognized business, engineering, science and nursing programs . This means that thousands more students will have access to the university’s high-demand programs, and Alberta businesses, industries, community organizations and public institutions will have the highly skilled employees they need.

This new funding will help us reach the University of Alberta’s goal of enrolling more than 50,000 students by 2025, up from 42,000 today.

Upon graduation, these highly skilled individuals will enter the economy, increasing Alberta’s annual GDP by up to $800 million and building stronger communities. The vast majority of U of A graduates – nearly 85% – stay in the province and find employment in all sectors, with one in five Albertans working for companies and organizations founded by U of A alumni. HAS.

Demographics are one of Alberta’s greatest advantages. By continuing to invest in our youth, we can ensure that Alberta provides thousands of talented young Albertans with the opportunity to stay in Alberta, creating a thriving economy and society for the benefit of all Albertans.

Bill Flanagan is President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Alberta.

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1 teenager injured, another in custody after stabbing near Gaithersburg High School https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/1-teenager-injured-another-in-custody-after-stabbing-near-gaithersburg-high-school/ Thu, 12 May 2022 21:45:17 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/1-teenager-injured-another-in-custody-after-stabbing-near-gaithersburg-high-school/ Police are investigating a knife attack near Gaithersburg High School in Montgomery County. Police are investigating a knife attack near Gaithersburg High School in Montgomery County, Maryland. Montgomery County Police and Gaithersburg Police arrived on South Frederick Avenue and Education Boulevard outside the school just before 3 p.m. Thursday. They found two high school students […]]]>

Police are investigating a knife attack near Gaithersburg High School in Montgomery County.

Police are investigating a knife attack near Gaithersburg High School in Montgomery County, Maryland.

Montgomery County Police and Gaithersburg Police arrived on South Frederick Avenue and Education Boulevard outside the school just before 3 p.m. Thursday.

They found two high school students near a public bus stop. One had cuts on his extremities and was taken to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries; the other teen is in custody, Gaithersburg police spokesman Dan Lane said.



Lane said a police officer found a “sharp instrument”. He added that the incident happened after school hours, so there was no lockdown.

Gaithersburg High School principal Cary Dimmick said in a letter to the school community that a witness called police.

“A situation of this nature can be troubling for our students. There will be counselors on site tomorrow, Friday May 13, to meet with all staff and students who need support,” Dimmick said.

Below is the area where it happened.

Mike Murillo of WTOP contributed to this report.

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43,000 students skip Odisha Class X exams, government orders investigation https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/43000-students-skip-odisha-class-x-exams-government-orders-investigation/ Wed, 11 May 2022 06:39:10 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/43000-students-skip-odisha-class-x-exams-government-orders-investigation/ The Odisha government has ordered an investigation into the absence of 43,489 Class X students from this year’s High School Certificate (HSC) exams which ended on May 7. The move comes after the Department of School and Mass Education discovered that of the 5.71 lakh students who had forms filled in for the exam, only […]]]>

The Odisha government has ordered an investigation into the absence of 43,489 Class X students from this year’s High School Certificate (HSC) exams which ended on May 7. The move comes after the Department of School and Mass Education discovered that of the 5.71 lakh students who had forms filled in for the exam, only 5.3 lakh actually appeared.

School and Mass Education Secretary Bishnupada Sethi has written to all District Education Officers (DEOs) asking them to investigate the large-scale student absenteeism in their districts. respective. DEOs were also asked to complete a school-by-school analysis for their districts and submit a report within 10 days.

The maximum number of absentees was recorded in the districts of Mayurbhanj, Ganjam and Bolangir.

The HSC exams, conducted by the Board of Secondary Education (BSE), began April 30 and were conducted at 3,540 centers across the state. In 2021, only 4,412 students failed the exam.

“The absenteeism of thousands of HSC exam takers this year is certainly a matter of concern. DEOs were asked to submit a school truancy analysis report for their respective districts and update it in a Google form,” Sethi said.

“Students’ studies have been severely affected due to the Covid-19 pandemic. They may have dropped out of the exam due to lack of preparation,” said Odisha Schools and Mass Education Minister Samir Ranjan Dash. This year, Dash pointed out, the state government had waived exam fees for undergraduates due to the Covid situation.

Meanwhile, the Odisha State Commission for the Protection of Child Rights (OSCPCR) has also learned suo motu of the large scale absence of students from HSC examinations and has requested the director of the secondary education and BSE to examine the matter and provide a report this week.

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Kenya: Boy Travels Over 60 Kilometers to Apply for Form 1 Admission https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/kenya-boy-travels-over-60-kilometers-to-apply-for-form-1-admission/ Mon, 09 May 2022 05:47:05 +0000 https://lycee-paul-claudel.com/kenya-boy-travels-over-60-kilometers-to-apply-for-form-1-admission/ Bungoma – A 16-year-old boy, Moses Oduor, from Busia County, Matayos Constituency, shocked many after walking more than 60 kilometers; from Busia County to Bungoma County to gain admission into Teremi Boys High School in Kabuchai Constituency. Oduor took his KCPE exam at Mundika Primary School in Busia and scored 361 points. He said he […]]]>

Bungoma – A 16-year-old boy, Moses Oduor, from Busia County, Matayos Constituency, shocked many after walking more than 60 kilometers; from Busia County to Bungoma County to gain admission into Teremi Boys High School in Kabuchai Constituency.

Oduor took his KCPE exam at Mundika Primary School in Busia and scored 361 points.

He said he received an appeal letter from Teremi Boys High School in Bungoma, but his poor mother was unable to raise the funds for him to join the school, adding that his father, who was the only breadwinner of the family, divorced his mother, leaving them without any financial support.

“I decided to walk because I couldn’t even raise the money to pay for the bus,” he told reporters when he arrived. He was wearing his old elementary school uniform and was in slippers.

Oduor said his ambition was to study through to college so he could raise the family and called on supporters to step in and help him raise money to fund his secondary education.

“I immediately joined the first class. My dream was to join Teremi Boys High School. I am very optimistic that someone will come to help me,” he said.

According to the school principal, Elphas Luvaso, the boy arrived at school around noon, without any admission materials. He said the school had already admitted 350 first-graders.

Luvaso appealed to Busia County Governor Sospeter Ojamong’ and Matayos MP Godffrey Odanga to participate and help the student pay the tuition.

Luvaso said a high number of new students are showing up tuition-free. “It is my humble plea to supporters to step up and help these students,” he said.

Luvaso admitted the boy and called on supporters to step in and help him. -Kna

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